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BUSINESS
August 6, 2013 | By Shan Li
The Environmental Protection Agency on Tuesday extended the deadline for meeting biofuel goals this year and will lower renewable fuel targets for 2014, a move designed to give oil refineries more flexibility. The 2013 rules, months late in coming, mandates that 16.55 billion gallons of renewable fuels be blended into the U.S. gas and diesel supply, up from 15.2 billion gallons last year. But the agency gave oil refineries an extra four months to comply, with the deadline extended to June 2014.
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BUSINESS
November 3, 2013 | By Ronald D. White
The road to a clean biofuels future is not easily traveled. Ceres Inc. in Thousand Oaks has some highly regarded science on its side as a producer of genetically modified seeds for crops used to make biofuels. Under the motto "Growing tomorrow's fuel today," Ceres has used advanced plant breeding and biotechnology to make better seeds for sophisticated versions of crops such as sweet sorghum, high-biomass sorghum, switch grass and miscanthus. Started in 1997 by a UCLA professor and his corporate partners with more than $50 million in private capital, Ceres makes seeds that can be converted into a new kind of ethanol using plant fibers instead of corn kernels or sugar cane.
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NEWS
July 15, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Jatropha? Camelina? Animal fats? That's what Germany's Lufthansa Airlines is using to help power four daily flights between Hamburg and Frankfurt that began Friday. Although other carriers, such as Virgin Atlantic and KLM Royal Dutch Airlines, have used biofuel on demonstration flights , Lufthansa claims it's the first passenger airline to use biofuel for scheduled daily flight operations. KLM last month said it plans to start using biofuel on more than 200 flights between Amsterdam and Paris in September.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2013 | By Shan Li
The Environmental Protection Agency on Tuesday extended the deadline for meeting biofuel goals this year and will lower renewable fuel targets for 2014, a move designed to give oil refineries more flexibility. The 2013 rules, months late in coming, mandates that 16.55 billion gallons of renewable fuels be blended into the U.S. gas and diesel supply, up from 15.2 billion gallons last year. But the agency gave oil refineries an extra four months to comply, with the deadline extended to June 2014.
BUSINESS
February 3, 2010 | By Jim Tankersley
The Obama administration gave a boost to the corn and coal industries Wednesday, announcing a series of moves to accelerate biofuel use and deploy so-called clean-coal technology on power plants. Unveiling the actions in a meeting with energy-state governors at the White House, President Obama said the steps would create jobs in rural areas, reduce foreign energy dependence and curb the emissions that scientists blame for global warming. "It's important for us to understand that in order for us to move forward with a robust energy policy," Obama said, "we've got to have not an either/or philosophy but a both/and philosophy -- a philosophy that says traditional sources of energy are going to continue to be important for a while, so we've got to just use technologies to make them cleaner and more efficient."
NATIONAL
February 3, 2010 | By Jim Tankersley
The Obama administration today will unveil a revamped strategy to ramp up the nation's use of biofuel in hopes of fixing a government effort that officials admit has fallen short in its attempts to wean cars and trucks away from fossil fuels and move toward ethanol, biodiesel and other crop-based fuels. The new strategy, which the president will outline in an afternoon meeting with Cabinet secretaries and his top energy advisor, seeks to put the United States on track to produce 36 billion gallons of biofuels by 2022 -- the amount mandated by Congress in the 2007 energy bill.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2011 | By Jon Hilkevitch
Continental Airlines flight 1403 made history when it landed at O'Hare International Airport in Chicago on Monday, becoming the first revenue passenger trip in the U.S. powered by biofuel. The Boeing 737-800 burned a "green jet fuel" derived partially from genetically modified algae that feed on plant waste and produce oil. In completing the flight from Houston, parent company United Continental Holdings Inc. won by two days the competition to launch the first biofuel-powered air service in the U.S. On Wednesday, Alaska Airlines started 75 passenger flights along with its sister airline, Horizon Air, that will take place over the next few weeks using a biofuel blend made from recycled cooking oil. The 20% biofuel blend the planes will use will reduce carbon dioxide emissions 10%, Alaska Airlines officials said.
NATIONAL
April 27, 2010 | By Christi Parsons, Tribune Washington Bureau
In a two-day swing through Illinois, Missouri and Iowa that begins Tuesday, President Obama will visit communities hit hard by the recession and tour two biofuel plants as he rolls out a special version of his election-year pitch aimed at rural America. In tow will be Cabinet members and advisors from the Midwest, all armed with a new White House report that touts success in many of the president's initiatives to help the rural economy and that points to the potential effect of proposals still in the works.
BUSINESS
September 17, 2009 | Tiffany Hsu
To many, algae is little more than pond scum, a nuisance to swimmers and a frustration to boaters. But to a growing community of scientists and investors in Southern California, there is oil locked in all that slimy stuff, and several dozen companies are racing to try to figure how best to unleash it and produce an affordable biofuel. The companies and several research labs have set up shop in the San Diego area, many of them in an area nicknamed Biotech Beach. There, around 200 biotech companies of all kinds are clustered near La Jolla on the mesa above Torrey Pines State Beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2009 | Bettina Boxall; Tiffany Hsu
A federal judge is blocking construction of new boating facilities on Lake Tahoe while he resolves an environmental lawsuit. The lawsuit, filed by the League to Save Lake Tahoe and the Sierra Club, challenges new regulations that would allow more than 100 new private piers, 10 new public piers, new boat ramps, mooring buoys and hundreds of slips. The regulations were adopted last year by the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency after years of controversy. Environmentalists argue that new piers and ramps would increase motorized boating and the pollution that goes with it. In a recent ruling, U.S. District Court Judge Lawrence K. Karlton issued a preliminary injunction.
WORLD
June 22, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
DIDA ADE, Kenya - With its leaf-thatched mud huts, bad roads, chronic unemployment, crushing poverty and vast tracts of "underutilized" land, the Tana River Delta in eastern Kenya seemed the perfect place for a foreign businessman looking to grow crops that could be turned into biofuel. Canadian David McClure believed the project, which involved leasing more than 600 square miles at a minuscule cost, would be both profitable and humanitarian. But McClure underestimated local resistance and deep sensitivity about land in a region where ethnic violence linked to land use has flared repeatedly.
SCIENCE
April 29, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
Once celebrated as an economic mainstay, the tobacco industry has been hard hit by health concerns, bans, lawsuits and the social stigma of cigarette smoking. Now, UC researchers are testing the plant's potential to be genetically modified in order to produce socially acceptable bio-fuels to power airplanes, cars and trucks. Preliminary results are encouraging, but more research is required before tobacco can be commercially farmed as an energy crop to meet the demand for alternatives to fossil fuels.
AUTOS
February 26, 2013 | By Ronald D. White
Oh what big plans we had for advanced bio-fuels. In the federal Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, the nation was given the lofty production target of 500 million gallons of so-called cellulosic bio-fuels for 2012. By cellulosic, we mean bio-fuel that comes from garbage, biomass like wood waste, sugarcane bagasse (waste residue from sugarcane processing), and other items that are considered superior to common corn-based ethanol. In times of drought, a ready supply of cellulosic bio-fuels would ease the burden on the nation's corn crop.
AUTOS
February 7, 2013 | By Ronald D. White
It isn't often that one gets to say that California has gotten it right in terms of attracting and supporting cutting-edge business enterprises. But in advanced bio-fuels, a new report says the state is leading the way. E2, also known as Environmental Entrepreneurs, is a Washington-based group of " business leaders who promote sound environmental policy that builds economic prosperity. " E2's new analysis of the nation's advanced bio-fuels industry said that California had 30 of the more than 80 companies that now operate in 27 states.
SCIENCE
November 7, 2012 | By Jon Bardin
Researchers have developed a way to enhance the energy produced by biofuels, potentially expanding their usefulness in jet planes and industrial vehicles. Biofuels, which are derived from the sugars in plant matter, have become a mainstay in the stump speeches of political candidates and the energy policy of the Obama administration, providing a potential alternative or supplement for commonly used fossil fuels. But one problem with most biofuels so far has been that they aren't potent enough to replace jet or diesel fuel because they have too few carbon atoms in each molecule.
NEWS
January 25, 2012 | By Marla Dickerson
Renewable energy seed maker Ceres Inc. is planning to go public. The privately held Thousand Oaks company wants to raise more than $100 million to expand its production of genetically modified seeds for crops used for biofuels, according to a filing this week with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Ceres plans to sell 5 million shares at $21 to $23 each, according to the filing, and has applied to list its shares on NASDAQ under the ticker symbol CERE. Biofuels have gotten something of a bad rap in the U.S. thanks to corn-based ethanol, which critics have dissed as an inefficient fuel that has driven up food prices while doing little to curb greenhouse gases.
BUSINESS
December 14, 2008
Regarding the story "A new bid to loosen energy laws," Dec. 8): As Yogi Berra was quoted as saying, "It's deja vu all over again." Weren't we here before and didn't some company from Texas, I think the name was Enron, get involved with fixing energy prices? Didn't we argue about generation and delivery? I now live in Oregon, where we know what we will pay for our energy, which is hydroelectric and, in the case of Tillamook, some biofuel. Dick Diamond Bay City, Ore. -- I was disturbed to read the piece on the Public Utilities Commission's plan to revive energy deregulation in California.
NEWS
May 25, 2008 | Garance Burke, Associated Press
A few years ago, drums of used French fry grease were only of interest to a small network of underground biofuel brewers, who would use the slimy oil to power their souped-up antique Mercedes. Now, restaurants from Berkeley to Sedgwick, Kan., are reporting thefts of old cooking oil worth thousands of dollars by rustlers who are refining it into barrels of biofuel in backyard stills. "It's like a war zone going on right now over grease," said David Levenson, who owns a grease hauling business in San Francisco's Mission District.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2011 | By Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
A federal judge on Thursday temporarily halted California's ability to enforce rules to reduce the carbon footprint of transportation fuels, effectively taking the regulatory teeth out of the state's year-old program. U.S. District Judge Lawrence O'Neill issued a preliminary injunction that ruled the California Air Resources Board's low-carbon fuel regulations violated the U.S. Constitution's commerce clause by discriminating against crude oil and biofuels producers located outside California.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2011 | By Jon Hilkevitch
Continental Airlines flight 1403 made history when it landed at O'Hare International Airport in Chicago on Monday, becoming the first revenue passenger trip in the U.S. powered by biofuel. The Boeing 737-800 burned a "green jet fuel" derived partially from genetically modified algae that feed on plant waste and produce oil. In completing the flight from Houston, parent company United Continental Holdings Inc. won by two days the competition to launch the first biofuel-powered air service in the U.S. On Wednesday, Alaska Airlines started 75 passenger flights along with its sister airline, Horizon Air, that will take place over the next few weeks using a biofuel blend made from recycled cooking oil. The 20% biofuel blend the planes will use will reduce carbon dioxide emissions 10%, Alaska Airlines officials said.
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