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ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2013 | By Susan King
British actress Vivien Leigh had that undefinable star quality. For 30 years, the exquisitely beautiful Leigh captivated film and theater audiences with her well-crafted, magnetic performances. In fact, Leigh won lead actress Oscars for creating two of the most indelible characters in screen history - the strong-willed, manipulative Southern belle Scarlett O'Hara in the beloved 1939 Civil War epic, "Gone With the Wind," and Tennessee Williams' fragile, faded Southern beauty Blanche DuBois in 1951's "A Streetcar Named Desire.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2014 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Gregory White Smith, a Harvard-trained lawyer, businessman, philanthropist and Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer who raised hackles in the art world with an intensely psychological examination of the life and work of Jackson Pollock, has died. He was 62. Smith died Thursday at his home in Aiken, S.C., of a rare brain tumor diagnosed nearly 40 years ago, said his spouse and co-author Steven Naifeh. Naifeh and Smith won the Pulitzer Prize in biography for "Jackson Pollock: An American Saga," which was published in 1990 and spurred the 2000 movie "Pollock" starring Ed Harris.
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TRAVEL
May 1, 2011
Born: March 6, 1928, in Aracataca, Colombia Awards and honors: Nobel Prize for literature, 1982 Life: Studied law and journalism at the National University of Colombia in Bogotá and the University of Cartagena. He began his career as a journalist in 1948, working in Cartagena, Barranquilla and Bogotá, Colombia; Rome; Paris; and Caracas, Venezuela. Among his best-known novels are "One Hundred Years of Solitude," "Chronicle of a Death Foretold" and "Love in the Time of Cholera.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
At least 25 streets and 46 schools are named in his honor, but many young people know little about Cesar Chavez, who in life was a polarizing figure, most famous for the successful series of marches, fasts and strikes he led on behalf of mostly immigrant farmworkers. The next big act of Chavez's afterlife begins this month, with the first dramatic film about the towering Chicano figure and a major biography due out days before California and other states celebrate Cesar Chavez Day on March 31. Both projects seek to reclaim Chavez's place in the American memory.
TRAVEL
May 1, 2011
William Faulkner Born: Sept. 25, 1897, New Albany, Miss. Died: July 6, 1962, Byhalia, Miss. Awards and honors: Nobel Prize for literature, 1949 Life: The family name was Falkner, but he modified it. He joined the British Royal Air Force in July 1918, but the armistice ended his dreams of fighter pilot glory. His first novel, "Soldier's Pay," was published in 1926. "Sartoris," published in 1929, introduced readers to Yoknapatawpha County. The fictional place also appeared in subsequent novels, especially "The Sound and the Fury," which also was published in 1929.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2013
Buck A Memoir M.K. Asante Spiegel & Grau, $25 A young filmmaker, academic and author of "It's Bigger Than Hip Hop," Asante traces his self-education as he makes his way from Zimbabwe to the streets of North Philadelphia and emerges through the power of language. (August) A Matter of Life Jeffrey Brown Top Shelf, $14.95 The author of the Star Wars parenting parody "Darth Vader and Son" presents an autobiographical tale of fatherhood in graphic novel form, focusing on Brown's relationships with his minister father and young son. (July)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2012
Detroit: A Biography Scott Martelle Chicago Review Press: 288 pp., $24.95
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2011
Robert Redford The Biography Michael Feeney Callan Alfred A. Knopf: 468 pp., $27.95
BUSINESS
June 17, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Two years after the release of the hardcover version of "Steve Jobs," the authorized biography of the Apple co-founder written by Walter Isaacson, a paperback version will go on sale Sept. 10. The paperback will come with a new cover photo of a younger Jobs. The picture, which was taken in 1984 by Norman Seef, shows Jobs in almost the same pose as the one in the photo used for the hardcover version of the biography. Simon & Schuster, the publisher, said the paperback version will also come with a new afterward, according to a report by All Things D . PHOTOS: The hidden gems of iOS 7 The original version of the biography came out in late 2011, just weeks after Jobs passed away.
NEWS
January 20, 2014 | By Mark Z. Barabak, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
In 1984, Gary Hart experienced the whole meteoric-crash-and-burn phenomenon in textbook fashion. The Colorado senator and dark horse presidential candidate finished a distant second behind former Vice President Walter Mondale in the 1984 Iowa caucuses, losing 49% to 17%. But in the odd alchemy of presidential politics, Hart was declared the “winner” of the caucuses -- despite the 32-point blowout -- because he held Mondale below 50% and outperformed...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2014 | By Rebecca Trounson
Bob Thomas, a Los Angeles-based reporter and columnist who covered entertainment for the Associated Press for more than six decades, writing compelling, human and often humorous stories about Hollywood's glittering and glamorous, has died. He was 92. Thomas, who also wrote biographies of many of the stars and studio chiefs of Hollywood's Golden Age, including Joan Crawford, Fred Astaire, William Holden and Walt Disney, died Friday of age-related causes at his home in Encino, his daughter Nancy said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2014 | By J.C. Gabel
Although he would hardly cause a blip on cultural radar screens today, Carl Van Vechten was, at various stages of his long and storied life, a journalist, provocateur, novelist, nightlife denizen, music and theater critic, confidant to Gertrude Stein, patron of the Harlem Renaissance, literary dandy, urban impresario, portrait photographer, archivist of Modernism and all-together man about town. A person of seemingly endless contradictions, Van Vechten was known for his many affairs with men - yet married to Fania Marinoff, a Russian actress and dancer, for almost 50 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2014 | By Jim Ruland
William S. Burroughs' "Naked Lunch" stands with Jack Kerouac's "On the Road" and Allen Ginsburg's "Howl" as the seminal texts of the Beat Generation. With its harrowing scenes of junkie depravity, its view of postwar America was the most extreme of all the Beats. Yet few American literary figures have enjoyed more second acts than Burroughs. He was spokesman for the countercultural movement in the '70s, begrudgingly bore the label Godfather of Punk in the '80s, and was a spoken-word performer and visual artist until his death in 1997.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2014 | By Allen Barra
In July 2009, a year before his death at age 99, John Wooden was named by the Sporting News as the top coach in the history of American sports. Not many argued with the selection. Over his 29-year career he won 664 of 826 games for a winning percentage of .804. From 1964 through 1975 his UCLA Bruins won 10 NCAA championships, and UCLA's games drew higher TV ratings than most NBA games. Surprising as it seems, Wooden, arguably the most influential coach in basketball history, has never had a definitive biography until now. In "Wooden: A Coach's Life," Seth Davis, a senior writer at Sports Illustrated and studio analyst for CBS Sports, has written a virtual cutaway view of the history and evolution of basketball in the form of a biography.
NEWS
January 20, 2014 | By Mark Z. Barabak, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
In 1984, Gary Hart experienced the whole meteoric-crash-and-burn phenomenon in textbook fashion. The Colorado senator and dark horse presidential candidate finished a distant second behind former Vice President Walter Mondale in the 1984 Iowa caucuses, losing 49% to 17%. But in the odd alchemy of presidential politics, Hart was declared the “winner” of the caucuses -- despite the 32-point blowout -- because he held Mondale below 50% and outperformed...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2014 | By Amy Reiter
As school book fairs and children's library browsers can attest, there is no shortage of biographies aiming to educate young readers about the lives of historical figures, from George Washington to Jackie Robinson, Annie Oakley to Anne Frank, Helen Keller to Harry Houdini, Eleanor Roosevelt to Elvis Presley. This month, several new picture books about famous thinkers and doers - bold breakers of boundaries and blazers of trails - will further crowd the shelves. The best of these deal forthrightly with their subjects' complexities and contradictions, acknowledging that even heroes make mistakes and suffer setbacks and that one can be inspired by someone's successes while acknowledging their failings.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2011 | By Jonathan Kirsch, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"I do not accept the claim of saintliness," said Mohandas Gandhi in 1920, when he had not yet been given the spiritual title of "mahatma. " "I am prone to as many weaknesses as you are. " These words are quoted at the very outset of "Great Soul," and author Joseph Lelyveld is quick to warn his readers that he does not intend to write about the iconic Gandhi that we all think we know. Rather, he proposes to "follow him at ground level as he struggled to impose his vision on an often recalcitrant India" and to focus on "incidents and themes that have often been underplayed.
BOOKS
November 29, 1987
I am writing a biography of the Irish leader Michael Collins to be published in the fall of 1989. I would very much like to hear from anybody in the United States who may be in a position to help me in my research. In particular, I very much wish to make contact with the family of the American journalist Hayden Talbot, who knew Collins between 1921 and 1922 and who published after Collins' death his own book titled "Michael Collins' Own Story." In addition, I would appreciate any information concerning Collins' brother, Patrick, who emigrated to the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2013 | By Randy Lewis, This article has been corrected. See note at the bottom for details.
As a leading authority on the Beatles, researcher and author Mark Lewisohn is well aware that there have been far too many books written about the Fab Four. "In general terms and in biographical terms, I think the Beatles have been underserved by books," he said. Yet Lewisohn, 55, just contributed one more to the fray: the 944-page monster "Tune In: The Beatles: All These Years, Vol. 1" (Crown Archetype, $40). So what's left to say after the hundreds of books, documentaries and fictionalized biographical dramas about the Beatles?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"Jimi Hendrix: Hear My Train A Comin'," which premieres Tuesday on PBS, inducts the (very) late guitarist, singer and songwriter into the PBS hall of "American Masters. " It's a sometimes-enlightening, regularly exciting, always watchable documentary that hits the main points of a short life. Still, viewers not already versed and invested in this music and milieu might want a little deeper context. Hendrix, who died at 27, has been gone for 43 years now. He was most assuredly a creature of his time, with his headbands and ruffles and psychedelic philosophizing, and yet he exists outside of time, one of those artists like Thelonious Monk, Miles Davis or Bill Monroe you could study forever, profitably, and never crack their secret.
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