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Biomedical Research

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NEWS
November 13, 1985 | Associated Press
The House voted 380 to 32 Tuesday to override President Reagan's veto of a bill reauthorizing biomedical research at the National Institutes of Health for three years. It was only the fifth time since Reagan took office in 1981 that the House has managed to get the necessary two-thirds of the members present to support an override. The override measure was sent to the Senate, which had passed the three-year, $7.7-billion bill unanimously.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2013 | By Michael Memoli and Jason Song
The Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation named a high-ranking White House official as its first president this week. In addition, the Broads announced a $100-million gift to their institute focused on biomedical research in Cambridge, Mass. The moves reflect the significant interest the Broads have in education and research throughout the country. The foundation tapped Bruce Reed, Vice President Joe Biden's chief of staff for nearly three years, to oversee its Los Angeles-based philanthropic group that backs efforts to improve urban public schools.
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NEWS
March 22, 1985 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration's plan to cut spending for biomedical research by spreading one-year financial grants over three years is illegal, according to a ruling by the General Accounting Office. Congress had voted to have the money spent in a single year, said the GAO, which interprets the laws on congressional appropriations. The President's budget sought to extend the spending for some funds in the budget of the National Institutes of Health.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2013 | By Samantha Schaefer
City of Hope, an independent hospital and medical research center, has selected the director of Northwestern University's cancer center as its first provost and scientific director. Dr. Steven T. Rosen will guide the scientific direction of the biomedical research, treatment and education institution, and help shape its research and educational vision, hospital officials said in a statement. He previously served as director of the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University and director of Cancer Programs at Northwestern Memorial Hospital.
NEWS
April 29, 1987 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, Times Medical Writer
Reports of irregularities in biomedical research--ranging from outright fakery and plagiarism to poor record-keeping--have increased markedly in recent years, shaking leading research institutions and triggering a sharp debate on the extent of the problem and the need for corrective measures.
NEWS
January 23, 1992 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The grueling propaganda war over the use of animals in biomedical research has shifted to an improbable battleground--the august pages of the 224-year-old Encyclopaedia Britannica and, specifically, the latest entry under the heading "Dogs." There, buried in the usual boilerplate--descendant of wolves, impressive olfaction, et cetera--the Britannica's anointed dog expert has seen fit to include what biomedical researchers, in high dudgeon, describe as a little antivivisection agitprop.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2013 | By Alana Semuels and Adolfo Flores, Los Angeles Times
Research into cancer, Alzheimer's disease and influenza may lose crucial funding even as scientists say they are on the cusp of medical breakthroughs. Deep federal budget cuts, known as sequestration, could lead to diminished funding for medical and scientific research, making some scientists question whether they should stay in the United States. If the cuts continue, scientists said, the United States could see promising graduate students going to countries investing heavily in scientific research.
NEWS
December 13, 1994 | FREDERIC GOLDEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Her father, a well-known entomologist, dearly wanted her to follow in his scientific footsteps, but Deborah Blum realized early on that she wasn't cut out for bug-hunting or, for that matter, any other sort of research career. While trying to cope with freshman chemistry, she nearly set the lab on fire when she knocked over a Bunsen burner.
BUSINESS
April 4, 1989
TAGO, a Burlingame manufacturer of immunological reagents for the biomedical research and clinical lab markets, announced the appointment of George C. Evanoff as president and chief executive, replacing Robert G. Kennedy, who resigned to pursue other business interests. Evanoff was president of Cordura Publications, a publisher of technical manuals, before joining TAGO.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1993
The recent exciting news from institutions in Los Angeles related to gene therapy and pancreatic cell implantation reminds us all of the great and direct potential of biomedical research to enhance our lives ("Baby 1st to Receive Gene Treatment, May 16, and "Artificial Pancreas Is Implanted in Diabetic," May 14). Few would deny that the relatively modest investment made by the federal government to research in our universities and research institutes has paid off, in improvement of quality of life, as well as in establishment of the biotechnology industry.
SCIENCE
June 12, 2013 | By Julie Cart and Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Tuesday proposed extending tough new protections for chimpanzees in captivity, a shift that would place strict limits on primates' role as human surrogates in biomedical research. In reclassifying chimps as endangered, the agency would put new requirements on the declining number of scientists who rely on chimpanzees to devise vaccines for infectious diseases, develop treatments for cancers and autoimmune diseases, and investigate ways to block dangerous pathogens that might jump from primates to humans.
BUSINESS
March 22, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores
California stands to lose about $180 million in medical and scientific research funding under sequestration cuts, the most of any state, according to a group of biomedical researchers. Sequestration, which went into effect March 1 after  Congress failed to reach a budget compromise, cuts $85 billion across government departments, agencies and programs. The National Institutes of Health, which will lose $1.6 billion of its $30-billion budget through the sequester, is the world's largest supporter of biomedical research, funding $2 billion in programs at the University of California system alone.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2013 | By Alana Semuels and Adolfo Flores, Los Angeles Times
Research into cancer, Alzheimer's disease and influenza may lose crucial funding even as scientists say they are on the cusp of medical breakthroughs. Deep federal budget cuts, known as sequestration, could lead to diminished funding for medical and scientific research, making some scientists question whether they should stay in the United States. If the cuts continue, scientists said, the United States could see promising graduate students going to countries investing heavily in scientific research.
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times, For the Booster Shots blog
Don't be fooled by some of the jargon of biomedical research: People who respond strongly to placebo medications are not dummies. A new study finds they tend to be people you would describe in much more favorable terms: straightforward, tough in the face of difficulty, and willing to lend others a hand. Maybe the people who don't respond well to placebos are the dummies: Angry, hostile and prone to negativity, these people seem far less capable of harnessing their minds to the task of healing their bodies, says the new research.
SCIENCE
October 1, 2012 | By Monte Morin
Fraud, plagiarism and other forms of misconduct are responsible for the majority of retractions in biomedical journals, according to a new study. The finding, published online Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , contradicts earlier studies that suggest most retractions are the result of errors. In a review of 2,047 retracted biomedical papers, study authors found that only 21% were withdrawn due to research error. But 67% were pulled due to misconduct, including fraud or suspected fraud, duplicate publication and plagiarism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2012 | By Stephen Ceasar, Los Angeles Times
As Carolina Herrera explained her biomedical research on inflammatory bowel disease, her audience sat wide-eyed, listening intently while chomping on egg sandwiches. The feasibility of a drug that would heal ulcers in the colon is not typical conversation fodder for teenagers - let alone over breakfast. But the students in the room were budding scientists unfazed by the seemingly unappetizing topic. The 16 students are taking part in the Latino & African-American High School Internship Program - a rigorous science program at Children's Hospital Los Angeles aimed at encouraging minority students to pursue a career in science or medicine.
NEWS
September 11, 1994 | MARY ANNE PEREZ
A grant will enable USC School of Medicine to expand its partnership with Bravo Medical Magnet High School with more support for its annual science fair, additional classes and summer training. USC was among 42 biomedical research institutions nationwide that were awarded a total of$10.3 million from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute to improve science education at primary and secondary grade levels. The five-year grant amounts to $200,000 for USC and Bravo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1996
It is gratifying to see your recognition that medical progress in finding cures for diseases such as cancer still depends on the use of animal models such as mice and guinea pigs ("Cancer Prevention Payoff," editorial, Nov. 17). In this century, 63 of 95 Nobel Prize winners in medicine and physiology have relied on data from animal studies, and because animal models have been used in biomedical research, many of us will live into old age with the benefits of such medical advances as balloon angioplasty, heart bypasses, hip replacements, better nutrition, and with continuing research, cures for cancer and cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases and many other ailments.
HEALTH
December 15, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
Chimpanzees remain indispensable for biomedical and behavioral research that benefits humans, but only in a small number of circumstances and likely not for long, according to a new report from the Institute of Medicine. After nine months of deliberation, a panel of independent experts judged that most current experiments involving man's closest primate relative can safely be discontinued. But the experts stopped short of calling on the federal government to retire all of about 600 chimps in its care, cautioning that unseen threats to human health "may require the future use of the chimpanzee.
NATIONAL
January 8, 2011 | By Michael Haederle, Los Angeles Times
A controversial plan to resume biomedical testing on semiretired, government-owned research chimpanzees living in Alamogordo, N.M., has been put on hold after the intervention of New Mexico politicians and a trio of U.S. senators. The National Institutes of Health announced this week that it would keep the 186 chimpanzees at the Alamogordo Primate Facility instead of transferring them to a San Antonio research center while the National Academy of Sciences determines whether chimps are still needed in biomedical research.
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