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Biometric Technology

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BUSINESS
August 26, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
Will the airport of the future be able to verify the identity of passengers with a quick eye scan? Aoptix Technologies Inc., a Campbell-based high-tech company, has developed iris scan technology the company hopes can be used by the Transportation Security Administration to verify passenger identification in a matter of seconds. To market, sell and develop such technology, Aoptix announced last week it had acquired $42 million in additional funding from investors, bringing the total amount it has raised to $123 million since it launched in 2000.
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BUSINESS
November 14, 2012 | By Laura J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
By the time Joe Rosenkrantz took his seat in his company's conference room, a video camera had already handled the introductions. An image of Rosenkrantz taken as he walked toward his chair instantly popped up on a nearby TV screen. "FaceFirst has found a possible match," the caption read. "Joe Rosenkrantz, Founder and CEO. " The process took less than a second, a demonstration of a capability that developer FaceFirst says could transform facial-recognition technology into an everyday security tool.
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BUSINESS
November 14, 2012 | By Laura J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
By the time Joe Rosenkrantz took his seat in his company's conference room, a video camera had already handled the introductions. An image of Rosenkrantz taken as he walked toward his chair instantly popped up on a nearby TV screen. "FaceFirst has found a possible match," the caption read. "Joe Rosenkrantz, Founder and CEO. " The process took less than a second, a demonstration of a capability that developer FaceFirst says could transform facial-recognition technology into an everyday security tool.
BUSINESS
August 27, 2012 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
Airlines are not the only businesses making piles of dough on extra fees. The nation's hotel industry is expected to collect $1.95 billion this year from such things as Internet fees, telephone surcharges, business center fees and resort fees, according to a study by New York University professor Bjorn Hanson. That revenue represents a 5% increase from last year, when hotels amassed $1.85 billion, said Hanson, a hospitality expert who attributed the 2012 rise to improved hotel occupancy rates and higher charges for many of the same services.
BUSINESS
August 27, 2012 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
Airlines are not the only businesses making piles of dough on extra fees. The nation's hotel industry is expected to collect $1.95 billion this year from such things as Internet fees, telephone surcharges, business center fees and resort fees, according to a study by New York University professor Bjorn Hanson. That revenue represents a 5% increase from last year, when hotels amassed $1.85 billion, said Hanson, a hospitality expert who attributed the 2012 rise to improved hotel occupancy rates and higher charges for many of the same services.
BUSINESS
October 4, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Northrop Grumman Corp., the second-largest supplier of computer systems to the federal government, won a contract valued at as much as $750 million to provide biometric identification services to the Department of Homeland Security's immigration agency. Century City-based Northrop has worked with the agency since 1999 installing biometric capture devices that allow it to scan and record fingerprints of those applying for U.S. citizenship and green card renewals.
BUSINESS
November 25, 2002 | Melinda Fulmer, Times Staff Writer
You might not peg La Playa Market, a cramped Inglewood bodega with a single checkout lane, as an early adopter of technology. But the store was among the first in the nation to install a groundbreaking and controversial personal-identification system that uses unique physical characteristics such as an individual's fingerprint to identify customers and crack down on check-cashing fraud.
BUSINESS
May 3, 2000 | Reuters
Microsoft Corp. said it plans to adopt biometric technology in its Windows software that will allow computer users to sign on using their fingerprints or other physical characteristics. The software giant said it has acquired biometric authentication technology from I/O Software Inc. in a major endorsement of this increasingly popular form of security that many consider more secure and convenient than passwords.
WORLD
September 2, 2005 | From Associated Press
The U.S. government said Thursday that it would proceed with plans to require travelers from Canada, Mexico and other allied nations to show a passport or other secure document to enter the country. The departments of State and Homeland Security said they expected to officially adopt the policy -- which has drawn complaints from travelers, the affected nations and even President Bush -- by the end of the year.
BUSINESS
August 7, 1988 | GEORGE WHITE, Times Staff Writer
Just as the outlaws of the Old West spurred security companies to design better vaults, modern-day electronic bandits are inspiring the development of advanced computer security gadgetry. The most sophisticated new equipment includes biometric machinery--products that verify the identity of would-be computer users by analyzing their unique physical characteristics. Among the offerings is an eye-scanning device that detects the unique blood vessel patterns in the retina, a sort of "eye signature."
BUSINESS
August 26, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
Will the airport of the future be able to verify the identity of passengers with a quick eye scan? Aoptix Technologies Inc., a Campbell-based high-tech company, has developed iris scan technology the company hopes can be used by the Transportation Security Administration to verify passenger identification in a matter of seconds. To market, sell and develop such technology, Aoptix announced last week it had acquired $42 million in additional funding from investors, bringing the total amount it has raised to $123 million since it launched in 2000.
BUSINESS
October 4, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Northrop Grumman Corp., the second-largest supplier of computer systems to the federal government, won a contract valued at as much as $750 million to provide biometric identification services to the Department of Homeland Security's immigration agency. Century City-based Northrop has worked with the agency since 1999 installing biometric capture devices that allow it to scan and record fingerprints of those applying for U.S. citizenship and green card renewals.
BUSINESS
November 25, 2002 | Melinda Fulmer, Times Staff Writer
You might not peg La Playa Market, a cramped Inglewood bodega with a single checkout lane, as an early adopter of technology. But the store was among the first in the nation to install a groundbreaking and controversial personal-identification system that uses unique physical characteristics such as an individual's fingerprint to identify customers and crack down on check-cashing fraud.
TRAVEL
May 10, 1987 | TONI TAYLOR, Taylor, an authority on the travel industry, lives in Los Angeles.
Thermal imaging cameras that see through smoke, use of biometric fingerprint and retina identifications, credit card/electronic access room-locking systems, and wireless transmission of in-room smoke detectors to a central point are among the newest technological developments in providing better hotel security and fire-safety programs. But the cost of some of these devices is slowing down their implementation.
BUSINESS
April 15, 2002 | MICHAEL CONLON, REUTERS
The need to positively prove identity in the world left changed by Sept. 11 is driving technology designed to help people clear security checkpoints at airports and elsewhere. One of the methods to which experts have turned also is one of the oldest--the fingerprint. Giesecke & Devrient, a German firm, recently unveiled a "smart" identity card that will contain two of the owner's digitalized fingerprints on an embedded chip.
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