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MAGAZINE
July 26, 1998
I was heartened to read that Helena Chang has persuaded her colleagues to turn over breast cancer test results faster ("The Lifesaver," by Lisa Leff, June 21). Health psychologists have documented the tremendous anxiety and stress that women experience while waiting for biopsy results. In one study, women with confirmed breast cancer called waiting for biopsy results the most anxiety-provoking time of their entire illness. However, not all of us are able to obtain an appointment for a biopsy at UCLA "within a few hours," as Chang herself was able to do after discovering a breast lump.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2012 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Brooke Burke-Charvet, cohost of "Dancing With the Stars," has thyroid cancer and is looking at surgery, she announced Thursday in a video to her fans. "I'm going to have a have a nice big scar right here across my neck," the 41-year-old mother of four says, making a cutting gesture with her finger across her throat. "And I don't get to just walk around and pretend like nothing happened or not follow up or not share it because it's going to be pretty much dead center. " She'd left fans hanging in July after she shared on ModernMom.com that she'd gotten a biopsy, then didn't follow up with the results.
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HEALTH
October 18, 2010 | By Anna B. Reisman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Last year, I fired a doctor. I was at his office to get the result of a mammogram, which I'd had about two weeks earlier. He flipped through my chart and found the document. A frown flickered across his face. "Anybody call you about this?" he said. "No. " My mouth felt dry. Why was I just hearing about this now? He told me that there was an abnormality on the left side that would require a biopsy. "Why don't you take a feel?" he said to the other doctor with him. Without asking my permission or cleaning her hands, the second doctor pressed her fingers into my left breast.
HEALTH
February 1, 2012 | By Eryn Brown
Everyone knows that it can feel really good to get a massage. Now scientists may have figured out why, by identifying how massage switches genes on and off, thus reducing inflammation and coaxing muscle adaptation to exercise. The discovery provides strong evidence that massage merits further study as a treatment for injuries and chronic disorders, said Dr. Mark Tarnopolsky, a researcher at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada, and lead author of a study about the research released Wednesday.
NEWS
September 30, 1987
Emperor Hirohito, who underwent surgery last week to relieve an intestinal obstruction, does not have cancer, his physicians announced. Tests performed at Tokyo University showed that the 86-year-old Japanese emperor is suffering from chronic pancreatitis, but a biopsy found "no cancer cells," Dr. Akira Takagi told a press conference.
MAGAZINE
March 13, 1994
"Sisters in Arms" (Three on the Town, by Wanda Coleman, Feb. 6) puts a racial edge on a universal medical problem. Doctors, especially surgeons, are not sensitive enough to women. I found a lump. My general practitioner, a surgeon and a mammogram all said it was nothing. Six weeks later, I went back to the surgeon ready to fight. "I want you to either biopsy this lump or aspirate it, and do it now," I said. When he aspirated the lump, I saw a cloud pass across the eyes of the nurse, and the doctor scheduled a biopsy.
HEALTH
October 6, 2004 | By Marc Siegel
'Brothers and Sisters' ABC, Sunday, Nov. 8, 10 p.m. Episode: "The Wig Party" -- The premise Kitty Walker (Calista Flockhart) is a 41-year-old political show host who has been diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (diffuse large B-cell type) on the basis of a needle biopsy of a lymph node. Her blood cancer is very aggressive, and she has completed her first round of chemotherapy. In this episode, her hair begins to fall out, and she spends sleepless nights caused by side effects from the prednisone she now is taking.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2012 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Brooke Burke-Charvet, cohost of "Dancing With the Stars," has thyroid cancer and is looking at surgery, she announced Thursday in a video to her fans. "I'm going to have a have a nice big scar right here across my neck," the 41-year-old mother of four says, making a cutting gesture with her finger across her throat. "And I don't get to just walk around and pretend like nothing happened or not follow up or not share it because it's going to be pretty much dead center. " She'd left fans hanging in July after she shared on ModernMom.com that she'd gotten a biopsy, then didn't follow up with the results.
HEALTH
October 3, 2011 | By Thomas J. Lomis, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's Tuesday afternoon, and I'm late for the office, delayed by a hectic morning in the operating room. I discard my scrubs, replace them with office attire, rush down a corridor and deliver the post-op orders from my last case into the hands of an anxiously awaiting recovery room nurse. Then I dart out the door and race to my office building. I open the waiting room door to a standing-room-only crowd that has accumulated due to my tardiness. I apologize, but they do not seem angry; I see only fear.
NEWS
November 19, 1989
Re: "Getting a Grip on Geriatrics," by David Larsen (View, Nov. 12): This is not an apology for those in the medical profession who neglect their patients, for whatever reasons. But as one who sees medical treatment given on a daily basis, there is hope! The only time our waiting room overflows is when an emergency patient has taken longer than expected, or treatment, such as a biopsy, must be administered immediately. This is always explained to those waiting. Our doctors value their patients' time; our patients realize this.
HEALTH
October 3, 2011 | By Thomas J. Lomis, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's Tuesday afternoon, and I'm late for the office, delayed by a hectic morning in the operating room. I discard my scrubs, replace them with office attire, rush down a corridor and deliver the post-op orders from my last case into the hands of an anxiously awaiting recovery room nurse. Then I dart out the door and race to my office building. I open the waiting room door to a standing-room-only crowd that has accumulated due to my tardiness. I apologize, but they do not seem angry; I see only fear.
NEWS
May 6, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
The specter of prostate cancer is alarming enough - and it just got even more alarming. Some doctors are reporting that men who get biopsies for prostate cancer may be putting themselves at risk for infection by drug-resistant bacteria. The reported trend is outlined in this Bloomberg article : “Among the millions of men tested for prostate cancer around the world each year, doctors are detecting an alarming trend: An increasing number of patients are getting sick from potentially lethal, drug-resistant infections.
NEWS
April 4, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
Breast milk may do more than sustain an infant; in the future, it could also be used to help assess breast cancer risk.  At least, that’s what a small study hints. By screening breast milk for cells that can turn into cancer, researchers believe they can develop a way to warn women if they’re at an increased risk of developing breast cancer later in life. Results from the new study were presented Monday at the American Assn. for Cancer Research in Orlando.  Researchers  at the University of Massachusetts Amherst  collected fresh milk samples from about 250 women, one sample from each breast.
NEWS
January 5, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
  A liquid biopsy? That’s what developers are calling a new blood test for cancer that’s been getting a lot of buzz lately. The test appears to be hypersensitive to even a single cell of cancer in the body. This video from KDAF-TV explains why this blood test would be a breakthrough in monitoring the spread of cancer in patients who have been diagnosed. Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital are working with corporate partner Johnson & Johnson to develop this test.
HEALTH
October 18, 2010 | By Anna B. Reisman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Last year, I fired a doctor. I was at his office to get the result of a mammogram, which I'd had about two weeks earlier. He flipped through my chart and found the document. A frown flickered across his face. "Anybody call you about this?" he said. "No. " My mouth felt dry. Why was I just hearing about this now? He told me that there was an abnormality on the left side that would require a biopsy. "Why don't you take a feel?" he said to the other doctor with him. Without asking my permission or cleaning her hands, the second doctor pressed her fingers into my left breast.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2010 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
Doramay Bailey got the bad news last year. Her annual mammogram at the county's Martin Luther King, Jr. Multi-Service Ambulatory Care Center in Willowbrook revealed a lump in her left breast. She needed a biopsy to determine whether she had cancer. But when she called to schedule an appointment at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, the disabled 58-year-old grandmother got more bad news. She was told the soonest she could be seen was February, five months later. Bailey is one of many women who have encountered increasingly long waits for biopsies at Harbor-UCLA, while those seeking biopsies at other hospitals are treated within weeks, if not sooner.
HEALTH
January 11, 2010 | Marc Siegel, The Unreal World
"Scrubs" ABC, Episode: "Our New Girl-Bro" 9 p.m. Jan. 1 The premise Dr. Elliot Reid (Sarah Chalke) is pregnant and experiencing morning sickness, cravings and mood swings while working at Sacred Heart Hospital. In this episode, medical student Lucy Bennett (Kerry Bishé) assists her in taking care of a patient admitted with breathing problems who has developed a low blood platelet count. Elliot believes that the low level of platelets (small cells that help clotting)
NEWS
April 4, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
Breast milk may do more than sustain an infant; in the future, it could also be used to help assess breast cancer risk.  At least, that’s what a small study hints. By screening breast milk for cells that can turn into cancer, researchers believe they can develop a way to warn women if they’re at an increased risk of developing breast cancer later in life. Results from the new study were presented Monday at the American Assn. for Cancer Research in Orlando.  Researchers  at the University of Massachusetts Amherst  collected fresh milk samples from about 250 women, one sample from each breast.
NATIONAL
May 3, 2010 | By David G. Savage, Tribune Washington Bureau
The family of a Los Angeles-area immigrant who languished in federal detention for nearly a year while a cancerous growth went untreated cannot sue government doctors for medical neglect, the Supreme Court ruled Monday. The case of Francisco Castaneda had been called shocking and "beyond cruel and unusual punishment" by a judge in Los Angeles. But in a 9-0 opinion written by Justice Sonia Sotomayor, the high court said federal law prohibited suits against the employees of the Public Health Service, which provides medical care at immigration facilities and at some federal prisons.
HEALTH
January 11, 2010 | Marc Siegel, The Unreal World
"Scrubs" ABC, Episode: "Our New Girl-Bro" 9 p.m. Jan. 1 The premise Dr. Elliot Reid (Sarah Chalke) is pregnant and experiencing morning sickness, cravings and mood swings while working at Sacred Heart Hospital. In this episode, medical student Lucy Bennett (Kerry Bishé) assists her in taking care of a patient admitted with breathing problems who has developed a low blood platelet count. Elliot believes that the low level of platelets (small cells that help clotting)
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