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Biotechnology

BUSINESS
March 13, 2007 | Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge Monday overturned the Bush administration's 2005 approval of genetically engineered alfalfa seeds and stopped their sale for now, in what activists hailed as the first ban on selling such crops. U.S. District Judge Charles R. Breyer in San Francisco found that the U.S. Department of Agriculture failed to adequately conduct an environmental impact study before approving them for sale.
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HEALTH
March 12, 2007 | Karen Ravn, Special to The Times
WE count on them to be strong and supportive, flexible and accommodating, willing to go the extra mile even when we load them down more than we should. Our knees. We put them through their paces, so to speak, every day. No wonder that, every now and then, they fall down on the job. Treatments for needy knees generally fit into three categories, says Dr.
HEALTH
December 11, 2006 | Rick Weiss, Washington Post
Ten years after genetically engineered crops were first planted commercially in the United States, Americans remain ill-informed about and uncomfortable with biotech food, according to the fifth annual survey on the topic, released Wednesday. People vastly underestimate how much gene-altered food they are already consuming; lean toward wanting greater regulation of such crops; and have less faith than ever that the Food and Drug Administration will provide accurate information, the survey found.
BUSINESS
December 6, 2006 | Daniel Costello, Times Staff Writer
Amgen Inc., the Thousand Oaks-based biotech behemoth, has been a shining star in the drug industry for more than two decades. Recently, it isn't burning so brightly. This morning, Congress begins hearings about cost and safety concerns around two of the company's top-selling drugs, Epogen and Aranesp, which are used to treat nearly 2 1/2 million dialysis and cancer patients with anemia in the U.S. each year.
BUSINESS
November 26, 2006 | Robin Fields, Times Staff Writer
In myth, seeds of rice came to China tied to a dog's tail, rescuing the people from famine after a time of severe floods. Ancient writings held that grains -- rice foremost among them -- were more precious than jade or pearls. Now China is deliberating whether to allow farmers to plant rice seed born of biotechnology, modified by scientists in the laboratory.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2006 | Daniel Costello, Times Staff Writer
What do you call a drug that costs as much as $100,000 a year but doesn't face competition? If you're a consumer footing the bill, you might call it an unfair monopoly. If you're the biotechnology company selling the medication, it's a money machine that needs to be protected at all costs. All this could change soon.
BUSINESS
November 10, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Genentech Inc. intends to acquire tiny biotechnology company Tanox Inc. for $919 million in cash, the South San Francisco-based drug maker announced Thursday. The acquisition would help streamline a three-way partnership the two companies share with Swiss firm Novartis in the development and commercialization of the asthma-fighting drug Xolair, which was created by Tanox.
BUSINESS
October 20, 2006 | Daniel Yi, Times Staff Writer
A Monrovia-based start-up on Thursday became the latest participant in a biotech consolidation wave that is seeing bigger players investing in or buying smaller companies. And much of that activity is in California, where the biomedical industry has become one of the state's fastest-growing industries, according to a report released Thursday. The trend is driven by bigger companies needing to keep their drug development pipelines filled with new products. That logic made Xencor Inc.
BUSINESS
October 16, 2006 | PAUL ELIAS, The Associated Press
Fourth-generation farmer Greg Massa was in the middle of the rice harvest and he was dirty, angry and depressed. The price of the gasoline that powers his water pumps and rice harvester has never been more expensive. A late planting season, hot summer and rising expenses had ensured a less-than-stellar harvest, with the U.S. Department of Agriculture forecasting a 13% drop compared with last year.
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