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OPINION
June 2, 2013
Re "Raising an alarm - and his income," May 19 Your article alleging that I didn't adequately reveal a conflict of interest doesn't mention that the "About the Author" page of my 2003 bioterrorism report explicitly stated that I was "a director of the Human Genome Sciences Corporation. " Moreover, readers who pursue your article to its 58th paragraph will find that it acknowledges that in the 2003 report, far from obscuring any conflict, I wrote: "As a member of the Board of Directors of Human Genome Sciences, a NASDAQ listed company, I have encouraged the company in its efforts to develop an anthrax antitoxin.
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OPINION
June 2, 2013
Re "Court lifts time limit on appeals," May 29 Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia's intemperate use of invective - "blooper reel," "feeble" and "bizarre" - against the majority opinion written by a fellow justice (in this case the revered Ruth Bader Ginsburg) continues to astound as he continues to diminish the dignity of our Supreme Court. Is Scalia auditioning for "Judge Judy"? June Maguire Mission Viejo ALSO: Letters: More on bioterrorism Letters: No more child deaths Letters: Forgetting about Alzheimer's
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NEWS
January 31, 0202 |
The World Affairs Council of Ventura County will hold a discussion on preparing for bioterrorism on Jan. 22 at 7:30 p.m. in the community room of the East County Sheriff's Station. Cary Savitch, an author and former congressional candidate who wrote a book on bioterrorism, is scheduled to speak. The other speakers will be Greg Totten, chief assistant district attorney for Ventura County, and Laura Hernandez, assistant director for the county Sheriff's Department. The cost is $15 for members and $25 for guests.
OPINION
June 2, 2013
Re "Raising an alarm - and his income," May 19 Your article alleging that I didn't adequately reveal a conflict of interest doesn't mention that the "About the Author" page of my 2003 bioterrorism report explicitly stated that I was "a director of the Human Genome Sciences Corporation. " Moreover, readers who pursue your article to its 58th paragraph will find that it acknowledges that in the 2003 report, far from obscuring any conflict, I wrote: "As a member of the Board of Directors of Human Genome Sciences, a NASDAQ listed company, I have encouraged the company in its efforts to develop an anthrax antitoxin.
NEWS
June 2, 2000 | From Associated Press
Doctors, not the military or police, will have to protect the public after a bioterrorist attack, but not one hospital in the nation is prepared, an expert warned Thursday. Anthrax bacteria released in a small shopping mall could cause a crisis requiring 2,600 intensive-care beds, a number "not available anywhere in the country," said Dr. Michael Osterholm, who runs the Infection Control Advisory Network and frequently advises the government on public health issues.
NATIONAL
July 14, 2010 | By Ken Dilanian, Tribune Washington Bureau
A move in Congress to cut up to $2 billion from bioterrorism prevention "will drive a stake through the heart of America's fledgling biodefense efforts," former Sen. Bob Graham (D-Fla.) told President Obama in a letter released Tuesday. "It will require your intervention to avoid a self-inflicted wound to America's national security," Graham said in the letter written with former Sen. Jim Talent (R-Mo.). The two chaired the Commission on the Prevention of Weapons of Mass Destruction, which in January gave the Obama administration a failing grade on bioterrorism prevention efforts.
NATIONAL
July 22, 2010 | Ken Dilanian, Tribune Washington Bureau
Seventeen senators have signed a letter denouncing an effort to cut billions in funds for drugs and vaccines intended to thwart bioterrorism. At issue is a House budget bill that would cut up to $2 billion from the Project BioShield special reserve fund to buy drugs and vaccines in the event of a biological attack. The funds were set aside as a guarantee to private companies that if they produced the medicines, government money would be available to buy them. The White House has not objected to the cut and has criticized the fund.
NATIONAL
August 20, 2010 | By Andrew Zajac, Tribune Washington Bureau
Acknowledging that the development of medical countermeasures against bioterrorism threats and pandemic flu is lagging, federal authorities Thursday announced a $1.9-billion makeover of the system for identifying and manufacturing drugs and vaccines for public health emergencies. The overhaul includes refinements to manufacturing aimed at shaving weeks off the time it takes to produce pandemic flu vaccine, and a series of steps aimed at more quickly spotting promising scientific discoveries and getting them to market.
NATIONAL
July 13, 2010 | By Ken Dilanian, Tribune Washington Bureau
On its face, it's just another Washington dispute about money. But a move by House Democrats to strip $2 billion from reserve funds for bioterrorism and pandemic flu — without objection from President Obama — has infuriated some of the country's foremost bioterrorism experts. It's a symbol, they say, of how the Obama White House is failing to properly address the threat posed by a potential biological attack, which they say could kill 400,000 Americans and do $2 trillion in economic damage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2001 | From a Times Staff Writer
The California Medical Assn. announced Friday that it is launching a campaign to warn people about the dangers of overusing antibiotics because of bioterrorism threats. "We are concerned as physicians that alarm over bioterrorism will cause some patients to seek and take antibiotics needlessly," said Dr. Frank Staggers, president of the group. Patients throughout the state will be receiving from their doctors one-page explanations on the dangers of taking antibiotics unnecessarily.
NATIONAL
December 21, 2012 | By David Willman, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Year after year, health officials meeting at invitation-only government conferences leveled with one another about Biowatch, the nation's system for detecting deadly pathogens that might be unleashed into the air by terrorists. They shared stories of repeated false alarms - mistaken warnings of germ attacks from Los Angeles to New York City. Some questioned whether BioWatch worked at all. They did not publicize their misgivings. Indeed, the sponsor of the conferences, the U.S. Homeland Security Department, insists that BioWatch's operations, in more than 30 cities, be kept mostly secret.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2012 | By Erin Loury, Los Angeles Times
Matthew Kennedy spent his 39th birthday at the hospital learning to walk again. Three months ago, the Venice Beach resident started having trouble moving his legs. When a chest X-ray at a Santa Monica health center revealed a shadow in his lungs, he was quickly transferred to a highly specialized tuberculosis ward 25 miles across the county at Olive View-UCLA Medical Center in Sylmar. Doctors think the bacterial disease attacked his nerves - unusual for TB, which typically infects the lungs.
NATIONAL
March 22, 2011 | By David Willman, Special to The Times
The Army scientist believed responsible for the 2001 anthrax letter attacks that killed five people and crippled mail delivery in parts of the country had exhibited alarming mental problems that military officials should have noticed and acted on long before he had a chance to strike, a panel of behavioral analysts has found. The anthrax attacks, the nation's worst bioterrorism event, "could have been anticipated ? and prevented," the panel said. The analysts also concluded that confidential records documenting Bruce E. Ivins' psychiatric history offered "considerable additional circumstantial evidence" that he was indeed the anthrax killer.
NATIONAL
August 20, 2010 | By Andrew Zajac, Tribune Washington Bureau
Acknowledging that the development of medical countermeasures against bioterrorism threats and pandemic flu is lagging, federal authorities Thursday announced a $1.9-billion makeover of the system for identifying and manufacturing drugs and vaccines for public health emergencies. The overhaul includes refinements to manufacturing aimed at shaving weeks off the time it takes to produce pandemic flu vaccine, and a series of steps aimed at more quickly spotting promising scientific discoveries and getting them to market.
NATIONAL
July 22, 2010 | Ken Dilanian, Tribune Washington Bureau
Seventeen senators have signed a letter denouncing an effort to cut billions in funds for drugs and vaccines intended to thwart bioterrorism. At issue is a House budget bill that would cut up to $2 billion from the Project BioShield special reserve fund to buy drugs and vaccines in the event of a biological attack. The funds were set aside as a guarantee to private companies that if they produced the medicines, government money would be available to buy them. The White House has not objected to the cut and has criticized the fund.
NATIONAL
July 14, 2010 | By Ken Dilanian, Tribune Washington Bureau
A move in Congress to cut up to $2 billion from bioterrorism prevention "will drive a stake through the heart of America's fledgling biodefense efforts," former Sen. Bob Graham (D-Fla.) told President Obama in a letter released Tuesday. "It will require your intervention to avoid a self-inflicted wound to America's national security," Graham said in the letter written with former Sen. Jim Talent (R-Mo.). The two chaired the Commission on the Prevention of Weapons of Mass Destruction, which in January gave the Obama administration a failing grade on bioterrorism prevention efforts.
NEWS
May 9, 2004 | Ceci Connolly, Washington Post
Budget cuts, poor coordination and a lack of attention from high-ranking federal health officials have "left America still too vulnerable to a possible bioterror attack," Sen. Joe Lieberman (D-Conn.) wrote Friday in a scathing iteration of gaps in the nation's preparedness.
NATIONAL
July 13, 2010 | By Ken Dilanian, Tribune Washington Bureau
On its face, it's just another Washington dispute about money. But a move by House Democrats to strip $2 billion from reserve funds for bioterrorism and pandemic flu — without objection from President Obama — has infuriated some of the country's foremost bioterrorism experts. It's a symbol, they say, of how the Obama White House is failing to properly address the threat posed by a potential biological attack, which they say could kill 400,000 Americans and do $2 trillion in economic damage.
OPINION
July 17, 2009 | Wendy Orent, Wendy Orent is the author of "Plague: The Mysterious Past and Terrifying Future of the World's Most Dangerous Disease."
After the anthrax letter attacks of October 2001, the Bush administration pledged $57 billion to keep the nation safe from bioterror. Since then, the government has created a vast network of laboratories and institutions to track down and block every remotely conceivable form of bioterror threat.
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