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Bipolar Disorder

HEALTH
June 30, 2003 | Benedict Carey, Times Staff Writer
Over the last two years, doctors have diagnosed Andrea Robinson with half a dozen severe mental disorders and prescribed her a series of strong medications, including antidepressants and an antipsychotic. Her parents are beside themselves. Andrea is 5 years old. "It's a very difficult situation," Tammy Robinson of Ottawa said about her daughter, who appears to suffer the telltale mood swings of bipolar disorder and is now responding well to a mood-stabilizing drug.
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OPINION
October 21, 2012 | By Juliann Garey
One in five Americans over age 18 suffers from a diagnosable mental illness in any given year. That's upward of 40 million potential voters. So why have we heard virtually nothing about mental health care from either candidate during this campaign? Just to provide a little context, according to the American Cancer Society's latest numbers, about 12 million Americans are living with some form of cancer; 400,000 Americans suffer from multiple sclerosis; 1 million from Parkinson's and 1.2 million are living with HIV/AIDS.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Church of Scientology handed over $8.6 million this week to resolve the lawsuit of a former member who charged that the controversial church caused him to develop bipolar disorder and nearly drove him to suicide. The payment came nearly 22 years after Lawrence Wollersheim, 53, filed his 1980 lawsuit, and nearly 16 years after a California jury awarded him $30 million. In the intervening years, the award was reduced on appeal to $2.5 million and went all the way to the U.S.
NATIONAL
September 5, 2006 | David Heinzmann, Chicago Tribune
Hour after hour, Christina Eilman threw herself at the bars of her cell, shrieking threats one moment and begging for help the next. Even the women in adjoining cells, many of whom were used to the chaos of lockup, called out to guards on Eilman's behalf. "I heard that girl screaming for her life, 'Take me to the hospital! Call my parents!' " Tamalika Harris, 26, said in an interview. "The way she was screaming and kicking on the bars, I knew something was wrong."
HEALTH
October 20, 2010
Studies have shown that nearly one-third of patients develop psychiatric problems after having a major surgery. But what about patients who have poor mental health before they go under the knife? Does it affect their chances for a full recovery? It depends on the type of psychiatric condition the patient has, according to a study published this week in Archives of Surgery . Researchers from the Iowa City Veterans Affairs Medical Center analyzed the medical records of 35,539 VA patients around the country who were admitted to the intensive care unit after a surgical procedure.
SPORTS
February 2, 2003 | Sam Farmer, Times Staff Writer
John Matuszak vowed to keep his Oakland Raider teammates in line. Instead, he kept them out all night. That was during the 1981 Super Bowl week in New Orleans, when Matuszak's capacity for alcohol and Quaaludes was as enormous as his 6-foot-8, 280-pound body. He basically drank Bourbon Street dry, the Raiders wound up beating Philadelphia for their second Super Bowl title, and fans to this day delight in recounting stories of the wild-eyed defensive lineman they called Tooz.
HEALTH
July 21, 2003 | Dianne Partie Lange
Bipolar disorder, in which a person's mood cycles between two extremes -- depression and mania -- is usually treated with a mood stabilizer and, when needed, an antidepressant. But researchers at the UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute have found that the standard use of these drugs often leads to a relapse. According to established guidelines, the antidepressant should be discontinued within three to six months after a person recovers from an acute episode of depression.
OPINION
December 14, 2008 | Laurel L. Williams, Laurel L. Williams is program director of the Menninger Clinic's adolescent treatment program and assistant director of residency training, child and adolescent psychiatry and assistant professor in the Menninger department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Baylor College of Medicine.
'I need these pills refilled," the weary mother says, displaying an array of empty bottles on the desk in my office. "My son is bipolar." The boy, a quiet slip of a 10-year-old, had been prescribed two antipsychotics, two mood stabilizers, one antidepressant, two attention deficit disorder medications and another medication to manage the side effects of the antipsychotics. The mother explained that she had just regained custody of her son and his brother.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2011 | By Stephen Ceasar, Los Angeles Times
Pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca will pay $68.5 million as part of a multistate settlement over allegations that it promoted its psychiatric drug Seroquel for unapproved uses, such as treating insomnia and Alzheimer's disease. The settlement will be shared by 37 states and the District of Columbia, California Atty. Gen. Kamala D. Harris said Thursday. California will receive more than $5.2 million, which will be used to cover litigation costs and add to the state's consumer protection fund, Harris said.
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