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Birds Of Southern California

NEWS
November 13, 1990
Description: Gray and brown above with rust-colored cap; red streaks across back; white eye ring; black whisker stripe on each side of the face; gray below; long, rounded tail. Juveniles are buffier overall and may show two pale wing bars. Length is six inches. Habitat: Dry, rocky hillsides, open pine-oak woods and brushy roadsides. Diet: Seeds, forb shoots and grass. Displays: Male and female perform "pair-reunion duet," a high-pitched shrill song, when meeting on their territory.
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NEWS
October 30, 1990
Description: Males are rose color with buffy undersides; females are brown with heavily streaked undersides, light eyebrows and cheek lines; undertail feathers are solid brown. Both have dark ear patch. Length is 6 inches. Habitat: Found in canyons, open woodland. Diet: Gleans seeds, insects from ground; eats mostly fruit in summer. Displays: Male hops while dangling wings and swelling chest. Wings fluttering and tail cocked, he sings and rises six to 12 inches off the ground.
NEWS
March 16, 1990 | Clipboard researched by Elena Brunet, Dallas M. Jackson and Janice L. Jones / Los Angeles Times; Graphics by Doris Shields / Los Angeles Times
WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH (Sitta Carolinensis) Description: A black cap tops its all-white face and breast. Has a stubby tail and its rust-colored underparts vary in intensity. Habitat: Common in oaks and conifers. Prefers mature stands with decaying trees. Diet: Acorns, nuts and insects, including spiders, larvae. Displays: During courtship, male carries food to female, performs bowing and singing ritual with head feathers raised, tail spread. Nest: In tree cavities or deserted woodpecker holes.
NEWS
April 13, 1990 | Clipboard researched by Elena Brunet and Janice L. Jones / Los Angeles Times; Graphics by Doris Shields / Los Angeles Times
RUDDY DUCK(Oxyura jamaicensis) Description: Chunky, thick-necked with large head. Has a broad bill and a long tail which is usually cocked up. Males have conspicuous white cheeks. Female's cheeks are marked by a single dark line. Habitat: Large lakes, shallow bays, salt marshes. Diet: Aquatic insect larvae, snails and vegetation. irries. Displays: Bubbling sound made by males used both in courtship and aggression toward other males.
NEWS
March 23, 1990 | Clipboard researched by Kathie Bozanich and Janice L. Jones / Los Angeles Times; Graphics by Doris Shields / Los Angeles Times
COOPER'S HAWK (Accipiter Cooperii) Description: Distinguished from other woodland hawks by a larger head; longer rounded tail and shorter rounded wings. In adults, there is a stronger contrast between back and crown. Habitat: Prefers mixed woodlands, or streamside groves. Diet: Preys on songbirds, small mammals, reptiles and amphibians. Displays: Courtship flight with wings in a deep arc. Nest: Broad and flat or narrow and deep.
NEWS
May 11, 1990
CANYON WREN (Catherpes mexicanus) Description: Mostly brown, with a white throat and breast. Has a chestnut belly, a flattened crown and a long bill. Habitat: Prefers steep shadowy canyons and cliffs near water. Diet: Mostly insects. Displays: None documented. Nest: Builds a cup of moss, spider webs and leaves on a base of twigs. Lined with grasses and other fine materials. Eggs: White, lightly flecked with reddish-brown. Call: Makes a sharp jeet sound.
NEWS
March 26, 1991
Description: Wings and underparts are extensively yellow; upperparts grayish during breeding season. Males have black face and chin with yellowish rump. Juveniles are faintly streaked. Length: 4 3/4 inches. Habitat: Dry grassy slopes, chaparral, oak and riparian woodland. Water availability plays major role in nesting site selection. Diet: Variety of native plant seeds; few insects. Fond of salt, especially when nesting.
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