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NATIONAL
January 17, 2014 | By Richard Simon
In Long Hill Township, N.J., authorities have used just about everything - divers, K-9 units, helicopters, all-terrain vehicles and scores of volunteers on horseback and on foot - to search for David Bird. The Wall Street Journal reporter, 55, who covers energy markets, hasn't been seen since Jan. 11, when he left home for a short walk. He was wearing a red jacket, bluejeans and sneakers, and left without his cellphone or his medication, which he is required to take twice a day. "This has really got everybody very concerned,: said the Rev. Victoria McGrath of All Saints Episcopal Church, where a prayer vigil for Bird earlier this week ended with the crowd singing, "He's got David Bird in his hands.
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SCIENCE
January 15, 2014 | By Amina Khan
Birds discovered V-formation flight long before fighter pilots did, but the exact reasons why they make these distinctive shapes in the sky has remained a mystery. Now scientists working with a critically endangered bird have discovered the avians' remarkable secret: They surf on one another's air currents by synchronizing their wing beats with the bird in front of them. The findings, described in the journal Nature, reveal an exquisite in-flight precision in the northern bald ibis that could potentially prove useful for flying commercial aircraft and building bioinspired flying robots.
NATIONAL
December 28, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
SALT LAKE CITY - Buz Marthaler felt the once-proud aerial predator fall limp in his arms, and the veteran animal caretaker knew he was facing a mystery unlike any in his career. Bald eagles are dying in Utah - 20 in the last few weeks alone - and nobody can figure out why. Hundreds of the majestic birds - many with wing spans of 7 feet or more - migrate here each winter, gathering along the Great Salt Lake and feasting on carp and other fish that swim in the nearby freshwater bays.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2013 | By Angel Jennings
A pair of flamingos might be the last to leave Betfair Hollywood Park when the Inglewood racetrack finally closes Sunday. The bright pink birds were supposed to make the move to Charles Paddock Zoo in Atascadero, Calif., last week with 10 other flamingos that lived in the infield lake at the 75-year-old track. But when a crew from Los Angeles Zoo arrived to capture them, five stealthy birds were able to flee through a hole in the mesh trap. PHOTOS: The final days of Hollywood Park  "It's not very easy to round up birds," said Susie Kasielke, curator of birds at the L.A. Zoo. "They get panicky and try to run out. " On a second attempt, zoo officials were able to wrangle up three of the escapees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2013 | By Angel Jennings
A pair of flamingos might be the last to leave Betfair Hollywood Park when the Inglewood racetrack finally closes Sunday. The bright pink birds were supposed to make the move to Charles Paddock Zoo in Atascadero last week with 10 other flamingos that lived in the infield lake at the 75-year-old track. But when a crew from Los Angeles Zoo arrived to capture them, five stealthy birds were able to flee through a hole in the mesh trap. “It's not very easy to round up birds,” said Susie Kasielke , curator or birds at the L.A. Zoo. “They get panicky and try to run out.”    On a second attempt, zoo officials were able to wrangle up three of the escapees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2013 | By Ralph Vartabedian
The Proud Bird, the historic LAX restaurant that has been a hangout for some of the nation's biggest aviation pioneers, will remain open for at least another year after the owner was able to secure a temporary new lease from the Los Angeles World Airports. John Tallichet had announced last month that the restaurant would close, after an unsuccessful two-year effort to negotiate a new long-term lease. He said he remained hopeful a last-minute deal could save the restaurant that his father, a bomber pilot during World War II, had opened.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2013 | By Ralph Vartabedian
The Proud Bird, the historic restaurant at LAX that has been a hangout for some of the nation's biggest aviation pioneers, will remain open for at least another year after its owner was able to secure a temporary new lease from Los Angeles World Airports. John Tallichet had announced the restaurant would close last month after an unsuccessful two-year effort to negotiate a new long-term lease. He had said he remained hopeful a last-minute deal could save the restaurant opened by his father, a bomber pilot during World War II. After an outpouring of community support, Tallichet pledged to keep the Proud Bird open until late December.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2013 | By Ruben Vives
About a dozen birds died in a garage fire Monday night in Sylmar, officials said. The fire was reported about 8 p.m. in the 15600 block of Cobalt Street, according to Brian Humphrey, a spokesman for the Los Angeles Fire Department. Firefighters arriving at the scene saw a large garage behind a single story home engulfed in flames, he said. It took more than 20 minutes for firefighters to douse the flames. Humphrey said the cause of the fire was electrical. No injuries were reported.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Wall Street is chirping about Twitter, which seems to be defying gravity. Shares are setting record highs in midday trading Tuesday, soaring above $50, despite mixed reviews from analysts. The cause of investor enthusiasm: Twitter's move into more targeted advertising that has been a boon for Facebook. Analysts say these ads are potentially very lucrative for social networks under pressure from investors to wring more revenue from users. Twitter said last week that it was rolling out retargeting ads for its more than 230 million active users.
SCIENCE
December 6, 2013 | By Amina Khan
As if crocodiles and alligators weren't terrifying enough, scientists have discovered that these ancient, sharp-toothed beasts are incredibly cunning. So clever that they use lures to trap and gobble unsuspecting birds. The discovery in two crocodilian species - mugger crocodiles and American alligators - is the first report of tool use in reptiles, according to a study in the journal Ethology Ecology and Evolution. Some birds, like egrets, actually choose to nest around crocodile and alligator hangouts because they offer some protection from tree-climbing predators like raccoons, snakes and monkeys.
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