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Birth Rates

NEWS
June 24, 2001 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What happens to a prosperous, peaceful society whose women decide en masse they have better things to do than have babies? Nobody knows. It's never happened. But Japan is about to find out. This nation's young women are now offered an unprecedented array of personal and professional freedoms, but the joys of children and family life are still bound by traditional constraints. The result of millions of women's individual decisions is a collective baby strike.
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NEWS
September 8, 1996 | LISA RICHARDSON and KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When teenage girls have babies, life's odds mount fast against them. Many don't finish school. If they marry, their chances of divorce are higher than average. They're less likely to receive prenatal care, and their babies are less healthy. Almost 4,000 teenage girls in Orange County are pregnant or have given birth so far this year. And the numbers are growing. The birthrate to teens increased by 34% between 1990 and 1994.
NEWS
March 21, 1988 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
It was a relatively slow day in the maternity ward of the Arab Aliya Hospital here. Two new Israeli-made incubators stood in the hall still partly unpackaged, and several beds were empty. Maliha Debabsiyh, 45, had just given birth to her 11th child, a girl, and a roommate who would identify herself only as Bassema, 29, had had her fifth. But it was clear that the hospital would fall short of its daily average of about 13 births, much less match the hectic night of March 5-6.
NEWS
July 1, 1998 | Associated Press
The percentage of unmarried black women giving birth dropped to a record low in 1996 after seven years of steady decline, the government reported Tuesday. Blacks were significantly more likely to have a child out of wedlock than whites, though less likely than Latinas. But the rate among blacks was the lowest since the government began keeping the statistic in 1969. Overall, the birthrate for unmarried women remained virtually unchanged after steady increases through the 1980s.
NEWS
June 24, 1994 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
La Mamma is the same dominant figure in Italy today that she was in Caesar's time, but she is raising fewer bambini than ever, and her changing role is forcing a social revolution in a country that is running out of children. A land where baby clothes hanging on urban wash lines has been as much a tradition as pasta is now graying rapidly. Italy's birthrate today is the lowest in its history and the lowest in the world--1.3 babies per woman. And that number is falling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 2004 | Daryl Kelley, Times Staff Writer
California analysts have sharply reduced estimates of the state's future population, and state planners are reconsidering long-term needs for new schools and other public services primarily as the result of an unexpectedly large decline in the birthrate among Latinos. The state's population will keep growing as the result of two things: immigration, and births continuing to outpace deaths. But the increase will be notably slower than once believed.
SCIENCE
November 22, 2006 | From Times Wire Services
The Caesarean delivery rate for U.S. women hit a record high in 2005 while teen births fell to a new low, government health officials said Tuesday. Close to a third of all babies born in the United States -- 30.2% in 2005, up from 29.1% in 2004 -- were delivered surgically in a procedure also commonly called a C-section, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2003 | Carla Rivera, Times Staff Writer
Patty Rodriguez was hardly prepared for the consequences when she began having sex. Her older boyfriend had her convinced that nothing would happen. Besides, many of her Parlier High School girlfriends were sexually active and they hadn't gotten pregnant. But now she tends to her 1-year-old son, Guillermo, in the brightly painted day care center, which opened about six months ago for student mothers like her.
WORLD
April 28, 2006 | Jeffrey Fleishman, Times Staff Writer
Europe is buying more coffins than cribs. The continent faces a shrinking population and other harsh demographic changes that threaten the welfare state unless it finds more foreign workers in coming decades. But its economic need for newcomers is at odds with its skepticism of embracing an angry and often disillusioned immigrant Muslim population.
NEWS
December 16, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a career on the front line in the battle to stave off Russia's worsening demographic nightmare, Dr. Sergei Shamin has a few choice words for his fellow Russians. "What irritates me and makes me furious is why our people don't want to be healthy!" he says. "Why do they want to be sick?" In a city so polluted that even a puritanical lifestyle is unhealthful, he has seen it all. "If there's a person who should not be anywhere near a smoker, he smokes himself.
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