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Bisphenol A

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May 15, 2008 | James Hohmann, Times Staff Writer
Congress on Wednesday waded into an escalating scientific dispute over a controversial ingredient in plastic products that some think may harm the development of children's brains and interfere with human reproduction. Members of a Senate consumer affairs subcommittee faulted federal agencies for reacting too slowly to concerns that children are exposed to bisphenol A, or BPA, through leaching from such items as water bottles, baby bottles and the linings of food and baby formula cans.
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BUSINESS
April 12, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
California's environmental science agency has added the controversial plastics-softening chemical, bisphenol A, to its official list of chemicals known to cause birth defects. The decision was announced late Thursday by the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment. The agency based its finding on a report by "an authoritative body," the National Toxicology Program, that the compound commonly known as BPA "causes reproductive toxicity...at high doses. " Quiz: How well do you remember 2012?
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BUSINESS
April 12, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
California's environmental science agency has added the controversial plastics-softening chemical, bisphenol A, to its official list of chemicals known to cause birth defects. The decision was announced late Thursday by the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment. The agency based its finding on a report by "an authoritative body," the National Toxicology Program, that the compound commonly known as BPA "causes reproductive toxicity...at high doses. " Quiz: How well do you remember 2012?
SCIENCE
September 18, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
Deepening the mystery surrounding the health effects of bisphenol A, a large new study has linked high levels of childhood and adolescent exposure to the industrial chemical to higher rates of obesity - in white children only. The latest research, published in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., measured bisphenol A, or BPA, levels in the urine of a diverse group of 2,838 Americans ages 6 to 19. Researchers from New York University also reviewed data on the participants' weight, dietary intake, physical activity and socioeconomic backgrounds.
BUSINESS
September 4, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Government toxicologists have reiterated safety concerns about a chemical used in baby bottles and food containers, just weeks after the Food and Drug Administration declared the substance safe. A report by the National Toxicology Program said there was "some concern" that bisphenol A could cause developmental problems in the brain and hormonal systems of infants and children. The conclusion repeats initial findings issued in April. The group said bisphenol's risks to humans could not be ruled out but acknowledged that its concerns were based on animal studies.
BUSINESS
December 16, 2008 | FROM TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Federal health officials, criticized for declaring that a controversial chemical was safe, have refused to back down and instead plan more research. The Food and Drug Administration, in a letter to independent scientific reviewers, said it was reevaluating its research on bisphenol A and carrying out additional studies. The letter was the agency's initial response to an independent report that found deep flaws in the FDA's conclusion that the chemical -- used in food packaging and also known as BPA -- was safe.
NEWS
June 9, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Bisphenol-A, also known as BPA, is often used to make clear, hard plastics and to line cans containing food.  It can mimic estrogen in the human body, and has been associated with adverse health effects such as reproductive abnormalities and a higher risk of cancer and diabetes.   In many places, the substance has been banned in baby bottles and other containers.  Reports about the risks it poses usually garner a lot of attention.  But regulators have been slow to knock BPA use.  The Food and Drug Administration has called for further study of BPA, but has not banned the substance.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Attorneys general from Connecticut, New Jersey and Delaware sent letters Friday to 11 companies that make baby bottles and baby formula containers, asking that they no longer use the chemical bisphenol A in their manufacturing because they said it was potentially harmful to infants. Although the Food and Drug Administration has tentatively concluded that bisphenol is safe based on a review of research, some manufacturers have said they would make bisphenol-free baby bottles.
NEWS
March 30, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The U.S. Food and Drug Administrationannounced Friday that it will not ban the use of bisphenol A, also known as BPA, in food packaging. [For the record: In an earlier version of this post, the Natural Resources Defense Council was misidentified as the National Resources Defense Council. ] In a 12-page letter,David H. Dorsey, FDA acting associate commissioner for policy and planning, wrote that the the Natural Resources Defense Council, which had petitioned the agency to change its regulations on use of the chemical, had not provided sufficient scientific evidence to change the current regulations.
NEWS
November 2, 2010 | Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Believe it or not -- considering all of the negative publicity the chemical bisphenol A has received, resulting in efforts to ban its use in baby bottles and other items for small children -- scientists didn't get around to publishing a peer-reviewed study measuring levels of the chemical in U.S. food until this week. The work was published online Tuesday in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. A research team led by Arnold Schecter of the University of Texas School of Public Health measured 105 foods purchased from grocery stores in Dallas in March 2010.
NEWS
March 30, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The U.S. Food and Drug Administrationannounced Friday that it will not ban the use of bisphenol A, also known as BPA, in food packaging. [For the record: In an earlier version of this post, the Natural Resources Defense Council was misidentified as the National Resources Defense Council. ] In a 12-page letter,David H. Dorsey, FDA acting associate commissioner for policy and planning, wrote that the the Natural Resources Defense Council, which had petitioned the agency to change its regulations on use of the chemical, had not provided sufficient scientific evidence to change the current regulations.
NEWS
October 24, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Bisphenol A, the chemical used to make some hard-plastic products, has been linked in several studies with health problems in babies and children. A study published Monday again suggests a strong reaction from gestational exposure to the substance. Researchers at Harvard looked at the urine samples of 244 pregnant women in the Cincinnati area. The urine was tested again at birth for the presence of BPA. The children born to these women were also tested for BPA and underwent behavioral evaluations.
NEWS
June 9, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Bisphenol-A, also known as BPA, is often used to make clear, hard plastics and to line cans containing food.  It can mimic estrogen in the human body, and has been associated with adverse health effects such as reproductive abnormalities and a higher risk of cancer and diabetes.   In many places, the substance has been banned in baby bottles and other containers.  Reports about the risks it poses usually garner a lot of attention.  But regulators have been slow to knock BPA use.  The Food and Drug Administration has called for further study of BPA, but has not banned the substance.
NEWS
November 8, 2010 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
The evidence for bisphenol A's negative health effects keeps piling up. In a study released Monday in the Proceeding of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers at the Harvard Medical School reported that the chemical interferes with reproduction in the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans . Scientists had already shown that bisphenol A, which is used in many plastics and in the linings of food cans , is associated with...
NEWS
November 2, 2010 | Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Believe it or not -- considering all of the negative publicity the chemical bisphenol A has received, resulting in efforts to ban its use in baby bottles and other items for small children -- scientists didn't get around to publishing a peer-reviewed study measuring levels of the chemical in U.S. food until this week. The work was published online Tuesday in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. A research team led by Arnold Schecter of the University of Texas School of Public Health measured 105 foods purchased from grocery stores in Dallas in March 2010.
HEALTH
August 9, 2010 | By Jill U Adams, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Concerns about the chemical bisphenol A and its potential health risks have led many consumers to be more careful about the containers they use to carry drinking water and feed their babies. The market has responded with water bottles labeled "BPA-free. " And then, in late July, the Environmental Working Group, an advocacy organization, reported that high amounts of BPA are present in everyday cash register receipts, as much as 3% of the total weight of the receipt. Certainly, there would be real concerns if the bisphenol A on receipts readily sloughs off onto the fingers of cashiers and buyers, penetrates several layers of skin and enters the bloodstream at potentially toxic levels, says Kristina Thayer, a scientist at the National Toxicology Program, an interagency group charged with evaluating toxic chemicals.
NEWS
November 8, 2010 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
The evidence for bisphenol A's negative health effects keeps piling up. In a study released Monday in the Proceeding of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers at the Harvard Medical School reported that the chemical interferes with reproduction in the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans . Scientists had already shown that bisphenol A, which is used in many plastics and in the linings of food cans , is associated with...
NEWS
October 24, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Bisphenol A, the chemical used to make some hard-plastic products, has been linked in several studies with health problems in babies and children. A study published Monday again suggests a strong reaction from gestational exposure to the substance. Researchers at Harvard looked at the urine samples of 244 pregnant women in the Cincinnati area. The urine was tested again at birth for the presence of BPA. The children born to these women were also tested for BPA and underwent behavioral evaluations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2009 | Amy Littlefield
A state panel will not require warning labels on metal cans, plastic bottles and other products that contain bisphenol A, despite more than 200 studies that have linked the chemical to cancer and reproductive problems. Wednesday's unanimous decision may speak to the limitations of the state Environmental Protection Agency's Developmental and Reproductive Toxicant Identification Committee. Dorothy Burk, chairwoman of the committee, acknowledged its reach is limited.
BUSINESS
March 6, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Connecticut's attorney general announced that six companies had stopped manufacturing baby bottles containing bisphenol-A, a chemical that some studies say may be harmful to infants. Attorneys general from Connecticut, Delaware and New Jersey sent letters in October to 11 companies asking them to end their use of the chemical. Avent America Inc., Disney First Years, Gerber, Dr. Brown's, Playtex Products Inc. and Evenflo Co. are voluntarily complying with the request, Connecticut Atty.
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