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Bisphenol A

WORLD
December 14, 2006 | Marla Cone, Times Staff Writer
The European Parliament on Wednesday approved the world's most stringent law aimed at protecting people and the environment from thousands of toxic chemicals -- legislation that will have a far-reaching effect on industries and products worldwide, including in the United States. The new law, which regulates about 30,000 toxic substances, is far more restrictive and comprehensive than U.S. regulations. The most hazardous -- an estimated 1,500 -- could be banned or restricted.
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NEWS
October 8, 2010
Bisphenol A is a chemical found in polycarbonate plastic used to make numerous consumer products. In recent years, studies have suggested that high levels of the chemical stored in the body can lead to adverse health effects. Prenatal exposure is thought to be particularly harmful because the chemical can mimic estrogen. High levels in pregnancy have been linked in some studies to an increased risk of obesity and behavioral problems in children. Research published Friday indicates that bisphenol A levels in pregnant women vary widely.
BUSINESS
September 16, 2010 | By P.J. Huffstutter and Andrew Zajac, Los Angeles Times
As lawmakers prepare for hearings into the largest egg recall in U.S. history, food safety advocates say the congressional probe could give momentum to a long-delayed measure that would enhance the power of the Food and Drug Administration. If passed, say policymakers, the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act could be the first major step toward streamlining the often unwieldy food safety system. For example, in the U.S. cheese pizza is regulated by one federal agency, but a pepperoni pizza is overseen by another.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2009 | Shane Goldmacher and Patrick McGreevy
Lawmakers on Friday gave final approval to a plan to cut the state's giant prisons budget, passing a hard-fought measure that would reduce the inmate population by thousands but stop far short of solving the overcrowding crisis. It would also leave California's budget with $200 million in red ink. Administration officials said Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger intends to sign the measure nonetheless. But as the lawmaking calendar drew to a close, the only other major legislation heading toward the governor appeared to be destined for a veto.
NATIONAL
June 19, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Four Ohio parents have filed a federal lawsuit against makers of baby bottles, claiming the bottles were made with a harmful chemical that sparked congressional hearings and prompted the world's largest retailer to phase out the products. The complaint filed last week in U.S. District Court alleges the companies knew that bisphenol A was associated with health problems but didn't disclose the risk. It cites scientific studies concluding that BPA, as the chemical is also known, seeps from bottles and sippy-cups into liquid.
NATIONAL
November 11, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Exposure to high levels of bisphenol A, or BPA, appears to cause erectile dysfunction and other sexual problems in men, according to a new study by the Kaiser Foundation Research Institute. Funded by the federal government and published in the journal Human Reproduction, the study is the first to examine the impact of BPA on the reproductive systems of men. Previous studies have involved mice or rats. BPA is found in thousands of consumer products, including dental sealants and canned food linings, and has been detected in the urine of 93% of Americans tested.
OPINION
August 8, 2007
Re "Scientists issue group warning on plastic chemical's hazards," Aug. 3 Reading the comments of Steve Hentges of the American Chemistry Council's polycarbonate/BPA group gave me a profound feeling of deja vu. Hentges' denigration of scientific evidence of the probable health dangers of bisphenol A (BPA) echoed the comments, over years, of "scientists" from the tobacco industry denigrating scientific findings of tobacco's health risks.
NATIONAL
May 3, 2005 | Marla Cone, Times Staff Writer
Male babies exposed in the womb to chemicals that mimic estrogen -- compounds found in birth control pills and some plastics -- are at risk of being born with deformities in their prostate and urethra that may lead to diseases in adulthood, a new study of lab animals has shown. Some researchers say the wider use of the chemicals may have contributed to a surge in prostate cancer in the last two decades, particularly in men under 65.
SCIENCE
September 17, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
The first large-scale human study of a chemical used to make plastic baby bottles, aluminum can linings and myriad other common products found double the risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes and liver problems in people with the highest concentrations in their urine, British researchers reported Tuesday. The findings confirm earlier results obtained in animals, increasing pressure on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to limit use of the chemical bisphenol A, or BPA.
HEALTH
June 27, 2005 | Judy Foreman, Special to The Times
Even amid the growing barrage of presumably well-intentioned health warnings now flying around cyberspace, this one is a doozy. It warns that microwaving food in plastic containers releases dioxin, a carcinogen, or cancer-causing agent. The e-mail notes that the warning about dioxin had been sent out in a newsletter from Johns Hopkins, the esteemed medical institution in Baltimore, and that similar information is "being circulated" at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, D.C.
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