Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBisphenol A
IN THE NEWS

Bisphenol A

SCIENCE
February 18, 2014 | By Melissa Healy, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
A team of researchers from the City of Hope in Duarte has developed a speedy way to identify drugs and chemicals that can disrupt the balance of sex hormones in human beings and influence the development and progress of diseases such as breast cancer. In a trial screening of 446 drugs in wide circulation, the new assay singled out the popular antidepressant paroxetine (better known by its commercial name, Paxil) as having a weak estrogenic effect that could promote the development and growth of breast tumors in women.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 8, 2010
Bisphenol A is a chemical found in polycarbonate plastic used to make numerous consumer products. In recent years, studies have suggested that high levels of the chemical stored in the body can lead to adverse health effects. Prenatal exposure is thought to be particularly harmful because the chemical can mimic estrogen. High levels in pregnancy have been linked in some studies to an increased risk of obesity and behavioral problems in children. Research published Friday indicates that bisphenol A levels in pregnant women vary widely.
HEALTH
March 28, 2014 | By Dana Sullivan Kilroy
If you're in the market for an alternative to plastic or metal water bottles, here are a few options: Lifefactory Flip Top Holds 22 ounces; weighs 19 ounces unfilled, $24.99 The cap at the mouthpiece is attached but flips back for sipping. The bottles are slightly curved, making them easy to hold. www.lifefactory.com/catalog/flip-cap CamelBak Eddy Holds 24 ounces; weighs 18.4 ounces unfilled, $24.95 Made with CamelBak's signature bite valve: Just bite and sip; no tipping required.
NATIONAL
November 11, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Exposure to high levels of bisphenol A, or BPA, appears to cause erectile dysfunction and other sexual problems in men, according to a new study by the Kaiser Foundation Research Institute. Funded by the federal government and published in the journal Human Reproduction, the study is the first to examine the impact of BPA on the reproductive systems of men. Previous studies have involved mice or rats. BPA is found in thousands of consumer products, including dental sealants and canned food linings, and has been detected in the urine of 93% of Americans tested.
NATIONAL
June 19, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Four Ohio parents have filed a federal lawsuit against makers of baby bottles, claiming the bottles were made with a harmful chemical that sparked congressional hearings and prompted the world's largest retailer to phase out the products. The complaint filed last week in U.S. District Court alleges the companies knew that bisphenol A was associated with health problems but didn't disclose the risk. It cites scientific studies concluding that BPA, as the chemical is also known, seeps from bottles and sippy-cups into liquid.
OPINION
August 8, 2007
Re "Scientists issue group warning on plastic chemical's hazards," Aug. 3 Reading the comments of Steve Hentges of the American Chemistry Council's polycarbonate/BPA group gave me a profound feeling of deja vu. Hentges' denigration of scientific evidence of the probable health dangers of bisphenol A (BPA) echoed the comments, over years, of "scientists" from the tobacco industry denigrating scientific findings of tobacco's health risks.
NATIONAL
May 3, 2005 | Marla Cone, Times Staff Writer
Male babies exposed in the womb to chemicals that mimic estrogen -- compounds found in birth control pills and some plastics -- are at risk of being born with deformities in their prostate and urethra that may lead to diseases in adulthood, a new study of lab animals has shown. Some researchers say the wider use of the chemicals may have contributed to a surge in prostate cancer in the last two decades, particularly in men under 65.
HEALTH
September 10, 2007 | Elena Conis, Special to The Times
THIRTEEN-MONTH-OLD Solange Dorsainvil plays with toys made from wood and cloth, drinks from a Swiss-made aluminum sippy cup and teethes on kale stems and celery. Her life is as plastic-free as her mother, Celina Lyons, can make it. Celina, a Berkeley-based acupuncturist, has become increasingly worried about the possible toxic effects of plastics. "I remember hearing -- I don't remember when -- that my Nalgene [water] bottle was no longer safe," Lyons said.
HEALTH
June 27, 2005 | Judy Foreman, Special to The Times
Even amid the growing barrage of presumably well-intentioned health warnings now flying around cyberspace, this one is a doozy. It warns that microwaving food in plastic containers releases dioxin, a carcinogen, or cancer-causing agent. The e-mail notes that the warning about dioxin had been sent out in a newsletter from Johns Hopkins, the esteemed medical institution in Baltimore, and that similar information is "being circulated" at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, D.C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2008 | Nancy Vogel, Times Staff Writer
Assembly Speaker Karen Bass, widely known as a nice person, flexed some muscle Monday: She punished the sole Assembly Democrat who refused to vote Sunday evening for a state spending plan drafted by fellow Democrats. Bass (D-Los Angeles) ordered Assemblywoman Nicole Parra of Hanford out of her fifth-floor Capitol office and into an office building across the street where legislative staffers work. "They wanted us to have everything packed up by 4 p.m.," said Parra's chief of staff, Derek Chernow, as he ripped packing tape to seal a box of office supplies.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|