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Bisphenol A

HEALTH
December 7, 2009 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
Is there really a connection between drinking juices out of aluminum cans and developing Alzheimer's disease? It is unlikely that drinking fruit or vegetable juice from aluminum cans would increase the risk of Alzheimer's. Aluminum cans are coated with a plastic lining to prevent corrosion and protect juice from acquiring a metallic flavor. These liners are not completely innocuous, we fear. Many of them contain bisphenol A (BPA), a compound that mimics estrogen. A December analysis in Consumer Reports notes that some juice and canned foods contain measurable amounts of BPA. :: Is there an exercise that helps relieve vertigo?
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BUSINESS
August 13, 2008 | DAVID LAZARUS
Maybe you've seen the ad showing an empty shopping cart in the middle of the desert. "Soon, many common, everyday products could disappear from grocery store shelves all across California," it warns. That would be pretty ominous, if it were true. Which it is not. The ad campaign by the American Chemistry Council is targeting a bill in Sacramento that would ban use of a chemical called bisphenol A, or BPA, in products such as baby bottles and sippy cups used by children under 3. The bill -- SB 1713, spearheaded by state Sen. Carole Migden (D-San Francisco)
HOME & GARDEN
October 9, 2010 | By Heather John, Special to the Los Angeles Times
KICKER: FIRST-PERSON PARENT I can't hear the word "plastics" without thinking of "The Graduate. " When the film was released in 1967, plastics may have represented the future, but today we're faced with the past ? what to do with all those used wrappers, bottles and baggies. It turns out a lot of that plastic is finding its way into the cafeteria trashcan. The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that the average school-age child generates 67 pounds of lunchtime waste each year, much of which comes from packaging.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2008 | Elizabeth Douglass, Times Staff Writer
There's a lot of action in any kitchen, so it's a good place to start changing habits and chipping away at petroleum use. The big-ticket items are the appliances. Refrigerators, dishwashers, ovens, microwaves and stoves all consume energy, and that power often involves a fossil fuel of some sort -- so I count using less power as cutting back on my oil/natural gas addiction.
NEWS
June 27, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
For consumers, a major problem with judging the threat posed by the chemical bisphenol A -- a chemical used in the manufacture of many plastics that can mimic estrogens in the body -- is that researchers disagree about how dangerous it really is.  (For more on this controversy, check out the related links to the left.) Now researchers at the University of Missouri-Columbia studying deer mice are shedding light on another way to measure the chemical's effects: Look at subtle changes in animals' behavior and cognition -- specifically, sexually selected behavioral and cognitive traits that drive their ability to find and attract a mate.
NATIONAL
April 1, 2003 | Marla Cone, Times Staff Writer
A chemical widely found in food packaging and other plastics may cause severe genetic defects in embryos, at levels people are commonly exposed to, according to a scientific study published today. Laboratory experiments by geneticists at Case Western Reserve University in Ohio showed that bisphenol A disrupts the way that chromosomes align to produce the eggs of mice, leading to aneuploidy, which is the main cause of miscarriages and Down's syndrome in humans.
BUSINESS
April 30, 2007 | Leslie Earnest, Times Staff Writer
New parents across America are taking a second look at a playpen staple of the 1950s: glass baby bottles. Replaced long ago in most U.S. households by unbreakable plastic, glass bottles are making a comeback prompted by worries about a chemical used in making the plastic. When Amber Rickert of Los Angeles first heard that a chemical might be leaching from plastic baby bottles, she felt sick -- and immediately bought glass bottles. "For me, it was like a total no-brainer.
BUSINESS
August 16, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Despite ongoing safety concerns from parents, consumer groups and politicians, a chemical used in baby bottles, canned food and other items is not dangerous, federal regulators said Friday. Scientists with the Food and Drug Administration said the trace amounts of bisphenol A that leach out of food containers are not a threat to infants or adults.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2009 | Eric Bailey
Despite a fierce lobbying effort by the U.S. chemical industry, the state Senate narrowly approved a proposal Tuesday that would ban the use of a substance in baby bottles, toddler sippy cups and food containers that independent scientists say is a threat to childhood development. The bill by state Sen.
NEWS
November 11, 2010 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
An expert panel convened last week by the World Health Organization recommended that public health officials hold off on regulations limiting or banning the use of bisphenol A . BPA, as it's commonly known, is used widely in plastic food receptacles and in the linings of cans. BPA that has seeped into food is the primary source of BPA exposure, the WHO panel reported. Scientists at the meeting determined that smaller amounts of the chemical lurk in house dust, soil, toys, dental treatments and thermal cash register receipts.  They said that models of the way BPA circulates through the body showed that BPA is quickly eliminated through urine and does not accumulate in the body.
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