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Bisphenol A

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2006 | Marla Cone, Times Staff Writer
Scientists on Tuesday debated the health risks of two chemicals found in plastic baby products as California legislators consider a bill that would make the state the only place in the world to restrict one of the compounds, which has been shown in some studies to mimic female hormones and possibly interfere with boys' reproductive development.
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BUSINESS
October 29, 2008 | The Associated Press
The Food and Drug Administration's conclusion that a controversial chemical is safe for use in food containers is badly flawed, an independent panel of scientific advisors said in a report released Tuesday. The chemical, known as bisphenol A, is used to make plastic for food packaging, baby bottles and other consumer and medical goods. Environmental groups want to ban BPA in products for infants because of concerns that it can interfere with their development.
HEALTH
December 7, 2009 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
Is there really a connection between drinking juices out of aluminum cans and developing Alzheimer's disease? It is unlikely that drinking fruit or vegetable juice from aluminum cans would increase the risk of Alzheimer's. Aluminum cans are coated with a plastic lining to prevent corrosion and protect juice from acquiring a metallic flavor. These liners are not completely innocuous, we fear. Many of them contain bisphenol A (BPA), a compound that mimics estrogen. A December analysis in Consumer Reports notes that some juice and canned foods contain measurable amounts of BPA. :: Is there an exercise that helps relieve vertigo?
BUSINESS
March 13, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- California's landmark “green chemistry” program is about to go public with a first list of consumer products that might need to be reformulated or pulled from retailers' shelves altogether. The state Department of Toxic Substances Control has identified three groups of goods as “priority” candidates because they contain hazardous compounds that could pose dangers to people or the environment. -- Tris phosphate, or TDCPP, is used in children's foam padded sleeping products, such as nap mats, as a fire retardant.
BUSINESS
August 13, 2008 | DAVID LAZARUS
Maybe you've seen the ad showing an empty shopping cart in the middle of the desert. "Soon, many common, everyday products could disappear from grocery store shelves all across California," it warns. That would be pretty ominous, if it were true. Which it is not. The ad campaign by the American Chemistry Council is targeting a bill in Sacramento that would ban use of a chemical called bisphenol A, or BPA, in products such as baby bottles and sippy cups used by children under 3. The bill -- SB 1713, spearheaded by state Sen. Carole Migden (D-San Francisco)
NEWS
August 25, 2010
A chemical found in plastics has been shown to increase testosterone levels in men, British researchers reported on Wednesday. They found that men who had high levels of the chemical bisphenol A also had higher testosterone levels compared to men with lower levels of the chemical in their bodies. The chemical, also known as BPA, is commonly found in plastic products around the world. The new study comes on the heels of research released earlier this month that found high amounts of BPA are present in everyday cash register receipts , as much as 3% of the total weight of the receipt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2010 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
The state Assembly passed a bill Thursday to ban the chemical Bisphenol-A from baby bottles and other items that come in contact with small children. The Toxin-Free Toddlers and Babies Act, or SB 797, would ban the use of BPA in feeding products, including formula, for children 3 years old and younger. BPA has been linked with health problems such as infertility, autism, asthma, hyperactivity and breast cancer. In January, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration reversed its long-held position that BPA posed no concern, calling for more studies of the artificial hormone that often is used in shatter-proof plastic baby bottles, sippy cups and linings of cans, including those containing baby formula.
SCIENCE
October 23, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
Exposure to the pesticide DDT could be playing a role in high rates of obesity three generations later, a new study says. Scientists injected pregnant rats with DDT and found no change in their levels of obesity or their offspring. But by the third generation, more than half of the rats (think of them as the great-grandchildren) showed dramatically higher levels of fat and weight gain, even though they were never exposed to the pesticide themselves. "Here is an ancestral exposure in your great-grandmother, which is passed on to you and you're going to pass on to your grandchildren," said Michael Skinner, a professor of biological sciences at Washington State University who led the research published in the journal BMC Medicine.
NEWS
November 11, 2010 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
An expert panel convened last week by the World Health Organization recommended that public health officials hold off on regulations limiting or banning the use of bisphenol A . BPA, as it's commonly known, is used widely in plastic food receptacles and in the linings of cans. BPA that has seeped into food is the primary source of BPA exposure, the WHO panel reported. Scientists at the meeting determined that smaller amounts of the chemical lurk in house dust, soil, toys, dental treatments and thermal cash register receipts.  They said that models of the way BPA circulates through the body showed that BPA is quickly eliminated through urine and does not accumulate in the body.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2008 | Elizabeth Douglass, Times Staff Writer
There's a lot of action in any kitchen, so it's a good place to start changing habits and chipping away at petroleum use. The big-ticket items are the appliances. Refrigerators, dishwashers, ovens, microwaves and stoves all consume energy, and that power often involves a fossil fuel of some sort -- so I count using less power as cutting back on my oil/natural gas addiction.
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