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Biz Markie

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1992 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rapper Biz Markie and Warner Bros. Records have agreed to pay songwriter Gilbert O'Sullivan a "substantial" financial payment to resolve a copyright infringement lawsuit by the former British pop star, sources close to the case said Tuesday. O'Sullivan filed the suit Nov. 13 in New York charging that "Alone Again," a song on Markie's "I Need a Haircut" album, contains an unauthorized 20-second slice of--or "digital sample" of--O'Sullivan's 1972 hit "Alone Again (Naturally)."
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
When first generation rapper Doug E. Fresh, former Roots beatmaker Rahzel or "Yo Gabba Gabba" rapper Biz Markie learned to mimic a hip-hop rhythm using only their voices, chances were they had little idea what they were actually doing with their mouths. "Beatboxing,” as it came to be known, includes laryngeal lowering and lingual retraction, labial approximation, velic raising (to seal the nasopharynx off from the oral vocal tract, of course) and rapid raising of the tongue dorsal.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2011
FAMILY A beloved kids TV show leaps from the tube to the stage with Yo Gabba Gabba Live. DJ Lance Rock and his colorful monster pals Brobee, Foofa, Muno, Plex and Toodee will dance, sing and entertain with help from hip-hop artists Biz Markie and Leslie Hall. Nokia Theatre, 777 Chick Hearn Court, L.A. 2:30 and 6 p.m. Fri.; 11 a.m., 2:30 and 6 p.m. Sat. $35-$140. (213) 763-6020. http://www.nokiatheatrelalive.com
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2011
FAMILY A beloved kids TV show leaps from the tube to the stage with Yo Gabba Gabba Live. DJ Lance Rock and his colorful monster pals Brobee, Foofa, Muno, Plex and Toodee will dance, sing and entertain with help from hip-hop artists Biz Markie and Leslie Hall. Nokia Theatre, 777 Chick Hearn Court, L.A. 2:30 and 6 p.m. Fri.; 11 a.m., 2:30 and 6 p.m. Sat. $35-$140. (213) 763-6020. http://www.nokiatheatrelalive.com
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1992
Coming amid the nationwide celebration of the 200th anniversary of the Bill of Rights, U.S. District Judge Kevin Duffy's decision in the Biz Markie copyright infringement case ("Judge Raps Practice of 'Sampling,' " Dec. 18) serves as a sobering--and much-needed--reminder that the First Amendment is not absolute in its meaning or protections. Nor would the music industry wish it to be. Interpreted literally, the First Amendment's guarantee that "Congress shall make no law . . . abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press" would overturn not only the obscenity laws the music industry routinely denounces, but also the copyright laws it strenuously defends.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
When first generation rapper Doug E. Fresh, former Roots beatmaker Rahzel or "Yo Gabba Gabba" rapper Biz Markie learned to mimic a hip-hop rhythm using only their voices, chances were they had little idea what they were actually doing with their mouths. "Beatboxing,” as it came to be known, includes laryngeal lowering and lingual retraction, labial approximation, velic raising (to seal the nasopharynx off from the oral vocal tract, of course) and rapid raising of the tongue dorsal.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2012 | By Ernest Hardy and August Brown, Los Angeles Times
In 1985, Los Angeles rapper Toddy Tee released what could be considered West Coast hip-hop's opening salvo against police brutality in black neighborhoods. The electro-grooved "Batterram," named for the battering ram that then-LAPD Chief Daryl F. Gates used to smash into homes of suspected drug dealers, was a hit on local radio station KDAY-AM. The track went on to become a protest anthem in minority neighborhoods around the city where the device was often deployed against homes that were later proved drug-free: "You're mistakin' my pad for a rockhouse / Well, I know to you we all look the same / But I'm not the one slingin' caine / I work nine to five and ain't a damn thing changed …" rapped Toddy Tee. The L.A. riots of 1992 arrived with its soundtrack in place.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2000 | NATALIE NICHOLS
On their third album, the British trip-hoppers affect a more upbeat tone as they continue to blenderize pop styles. Indulging their retro passions, they veer confidently from languid bluesiness to jaunty funk to vibrant disco, even offering an old-school-sounding hip-hop ditty featuring a freestyling Biz Markie. Skye Edwards' vocals may be less gloriously depressive, but she's still engagingly contemplative on such tracks as "Love Is Rare."
BUSINESS
April 10, 1990
DIC Enterprises, a Burbank producer of animated children's television programs, said two production companies have entered into a nonexclusive arrangement to jointly produce live-action and combination live action-animated programs for DIC. LMNO Productions, headed by Eric Schotz, a former "Eye on L.A." producer, and K.O. Productions, headed by Kevin O'Donnell, a former DIC executive, are currently developing for DIC a Saturday morning pilot called "Let's Get Bizzy," featuring rapper Biz Markie.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2000
De La Soul headlines the Live at the BBQ hip-hop festival on July 3 at Oak Canyon Ranch in Santiago Canyon. Also on the main stage bill are Common, Reflection Eternal, Mos Def, Biz Markie, Talib Kweli & Hi-Tek, Pharoahe Monch, Souls of Mischief, Dilated Peoples, Jeru the Damaja, Medusa, Aceyalone, X-Ecutioners, Craze, Cash Money and Beat Junkies. A second stage will have performances by Dusk, Mark Luv Drez, Higher Gabe Real and Filthy Immigrants.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1992
Coming amid the nationwide celebration of the 200th anniversary of the Bill of Rights, U.S. District Judge Kevin Duffy's decision in the Biz Markie copyright infringement case ("Judge Raps Practice of 'Sampling,' " Dec. 18) serves as a sobering--and much-needed--reminder that the First Amendment is not absolute in its meaning or protections. Nor would the music industry wish it to be. Interpreted literally, the First Amendment's guarantee that "Congress shall make no law . . . abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press" would overturn not only the obscenity laws the music industry routinely denounces, but also the copyright laws it strenuously defends.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1992 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rapper Biz Markie and Warner Bros. Records have agreed to pay songwriter Gilbert O'Sullivan a "substantial" financial payment to resolve a copyright infringement lawsuit by the former British pop star, sources close to the case said Tuesday. O'Sullivan filed the suit Nov. 13 in New York charging that "Alone Again," a song on Markie's "I Need a Haircut" album, contains an unauthorized 20-second slice of--or "digital sample" of--O'Sullivan's 1972 hit "Alone Again (Naturally)."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2000 | SOREN BAKER
This hard-core Queens quartet raps ferociously about politics, their street authenticity and underclass struggle on a stellar debut album. KL, Hostyle, Poet and Kyron are all capable rappers who deliver no-nonsense rhymes throughout the 20 tracks. Intense, top-notch beats from DJ Premier (Rakim, the Notorious B.I.G.), Pete Rock (Public Enemy, Raekwon), Marley Marl (LL Cool J, Biz Markie) and others enhance the package.
NEWS
February 28, 2002
* ... And You Will Know Us by the Trail of Dead, "Source Tags & Codes," Interscope. The Texans' major-label debut makes good on the promise of the raw energy and intelligence of its independent releases and a reputation for invigoratingly chaotic concerts. Also: Biz Markie, "The Weekend Warrior," Groove/Attack Cher, "Living Proof," Warner Bros.
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