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Black Cohosh

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HEALTH
June 28, 2004 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
When warnings first emerged two years ago about the safety of taking hormones for menopausal symptoms, many women began turning to alternative treatments, such as herbs, for relief. Now researchers are asking whether the most common of those herbs, black cohosh, is any safer. A plant native to North America, black cohosh has long been an American folk remedy for menopausal discomforts such as hot flashes.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
January 24, 2011 | By Joe Graedon and Theresa Graedon, Special to the Los Angeles Times
My doctor prescribed Vytorin for high cholesterol. While my cholesterol went from over 350 to 190 in five weeks, I ended up having an eight-hour episode of transient global amnesia (TGA). I knew who I was, and I recognized my family and friends, but I didn't know the year. I didn't recognize streets I have driven for many years. I asked my husband the same five questions in the hospital over and over until late in the evening, when my memory returned. I immediately went off Vytorin.
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SCIENCE
December 19, 2006 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
The widely used herbal remedy black cohosh does nothing to eliminate hot flashes, night sweats and other symptoms of menopause, either alone or in combination with other herbs, federally sponsored researchers reported Monday. Thousands of women use the supplement, but a controlled trial reported in the Annals of Internal Medicine showed it was no more effective than a placebo. Only estrogen significantly reduced hot flashes.
SCIENCE
December 19, 2006 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
The widely used herbal remedy black cohosh does nothing to eliminate hot flashes, night sweats and other symptoms of menopause, either alone or in combination with other herbs, federally sponsored researchers reported Monday. Thousands of women use the supplement, but a controlled trial reported in the Annals of Internal Medicine showed it was no more effective than a placebo. Only estrogen significantly reduced hot flashes.
HEALTH
November 25, 2002 | Shari Roan
With warnings that hormone replacement therapy may be unsafe for long-term use, women are turning to natural remedies for relief from menopausal symptoms. The most popular supplement, an herb called black cohosh, was used by Native Americans for kidney ailments, malaria and women's reproductive problems. White American settlers learned of it in the 1800s; it was the key mystery ingredient in the popular, turn-of-the-century Vegetable Compound tonic.
NATIONAL
July 13, 2003 | From Reuters
Black cohosh, an herb popular for relieving the hot flashes and some other unpleasant symptoms of menopause, may make cancer more likely to spread, U.S. and Canadian researchers said Saturday. The news is yet another blow to women looking for something to safely ease the symptoms of menopause, which range from hot flashes to a higher risk of heart disease and cancer.
HEALTH
May 9, 2005 | Elena Conis
Americans bought more than $18 billion of dietary supplements last year, with women doing most of the purchasing. Many herbal products are marketed primarily to women for health concerns such as menstrual and menopausal symptoms, conception, osteoporosis and breast cancer. Many herbal supplements recommended for women's health -- soy and flax, for example -- come from plants with chemicals that mimic the female hormone estrogen.
HEALTH
January 24, 2011 | By Joe Graedon and Theresa Graedon, Special to the Los Angeles Times
My doctor prescribed Vytorin for high cholesterol. While my cholesterol went from over 350 to 190 in five weeks, I ended up having an eight-hour episode of transient global amnesia (TGA). I knew who I was, and I recognized my family and friends, but I didn't know the year. I didn't recognize streets I have driven for many years. I asked my husband the same five questions in the hospital over and over until late in the evening, when my memory returned. I immediately went off Vytorin.
NATIONAL
August 10, 2013 | By David Zucchino
CHEROKEE, N.C. - The first thing National Park Service Ranger Lamon Brown noticed was an illegal campsite, littered with food wrappers and marked by a smoldering fire ring. Then the ranger spotted two figures skulking out of the dense forest near Andrews Bald in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Their hands were filthy. Their clothes were muddy. One toted a bulging backpack. These were the Hurley boys, notorious for rustling wild ginseng roots, a federal crime in the park.
HEALTH
July 15, 2002 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More women than ever may now look for other ways to ease menopausal symptoms after last week's news that long-term hormone therapy increases slightly the risk of heart attacks, strokes and breast cancer. One of the most likely options, experts say, will be natural therapies. Already, more than 30% of women say they use herbs and other supplements, according to the North American Menopause Society.
HEALTH
May 9, 2005 | Elena Conis
Americans bought more than $18 billion of dietary supplements last year, with women doing most of the purchasing. Many herbal products are marketed primarily to women for health concerns such as menstrual and menopausal symptoms, conception, osteoporosis and breast cancer. Many herbal supplements recommended for women's health -- soy and flax, for example -- come from plants with chemicals that mimic the female hormone estrogen.
HEALTH
June 28, 2004 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
When warnings first emerged two years ago about the safety of taking hormones for menopausal symptoms, many women began turning to alternative treatments, such as herbs, for relief. Now researchers are asking whether the most common of those herbs, black cohosh, is any safer. A plant native to North America, black cohosh has long been an American folk remedy for menopausal discomforts such as hot flashes.
NATIONAL
July 13, 2003 | From Reuters
Black cohosh, an herb popular for relieving the hot flashes and some other unpleasant symptoms of menopause, may make cancer more likely to spread, U.S. and Canadian researchers said Saturday. The news is yet another blow to women looking for something to safely ease the symptoms of menopause, which range from hot flashes to a higher risk of heart disease and cancer.
HEALTH
November 25, 2002 | Shari Roan
With warnings that hormone replacement therapy may be unsafe for long-term use, women are turning to natural remedies for relief from menopausal symptoms. The most popular supplement, an herb called black cohosh, was used by Native Americans for kidney ailments, malaria and women's reproductive problems. White American settlers learned of it in the 1800s; it was the key mystery ingredient in the popular, turn-of-the-century Vegetable Compound tonic.
HEALTH
April 15, 2002 | DIANNE PARTIE LANGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The motivation to put a tiny barbell through the tongue may escape anyone over age 22, but even young people would be smart to give up tongue piercing if they care about their teeth. A study of 52 young adults whose tongues were pierced found that receding gums were quite common in the years following the procedure. About half of the men and women studied who had worn long barbells for two years or longer had receding gums on their lower incisors.
HEALTH
August 14, 2000 | Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon, Joe Graedon is a pharmacologist. Teresa Graedon holds a doctorate in medical anthropology and is a nutrition expert
Question: My niece is very shy. Although she is a smart girl, she never raises her hand in class. She has a hard time making new friends and was reluctant to go to camp this summer, even though she had a good time once she got there. This is a pattern, so my sister has asked the pediatrician about Paxil. She heard that it is good for shyness, and he is willing to prescribe it. I am appalled that they would medicate an 8-year-old like this. I was a shy kid myself, and I grew out of it.
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