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Black Entertainment Television

ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1997 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even as the television industry seeks approval from the government and the public for its controversial new ratings system, it has failed to convince two of its own. While most cable channels are slowly joining the major broadcast networks in labeling TV shows to help parents guide their children's viewing, two significant exceptions are beginning to stand out: PBS and cable's Black Entertainment Television.
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NEWS
January 23, 1996 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
O.J. Live. Finally. No limits. No restrictions. No holds barred. That's the claim, at least, of Black Entertainment Television executives planning to air an interview Wednesday with O.J. Simpson--his first live question-and-answer session since his acquittal on murder charges. Jefferi K. Lee, president of BET Networks, said Monday that he expects the hourlong interview, scheduled to be broadcast Wednesday at 7 p.m. on the cable network, to be informative and forthcoming.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1991 | JUBE SHIVER JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Only two years ago, Black Entertainment Television founder Bob Johnson seemed something of a pariah in Hollywood. His Washington-based cable network's reliance on music videos and other inexpensive shows drew widespread criticism from black producers who accused Johnson of squandering the resources of the nation's only black-owned cable channel. And Johnson seemed equally testy about Hollywood, saying, "I don't get excited sitting around with Hollywood types talking about programming."
BUSINESS
August 27, 1989 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
A few years after founding Washington-based Black Entertainment Television in 1980, owner Robert Johnson boasted that the nation's only black-owned cable network--then barely breaking even with B-movies and music videos--would be showing more costly dramatic series and soap operas "as early as 1986."
NEWS
January 25, 1996 | HENRY WEINSTEIN and TIM RUTTEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
O.J. Simpson has played many roles during his long career on the public stage--football hero, corporate pitchman and comic actor. In his interview with Black Entertainment Television on Wednesday, he assumed still another part--victim. How well it will play remains to be determined.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2001 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The rap continues over the rap and music videos featured on Black Entertainment Television, or BET. The Council of Presidents, a coalition of leaders from national African American college sororities and fraternities, are scheduled to meet this weekend to discuss continuing concerns over videos airing on the black-themed network that feature scantily clad women and rappers bragging about their money, jewelry and sexual prowess. The group has been worried about the impact of the videos on youth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1996 | TIM RUTTEN and HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
O.J. Simpson's first interview since his acquittal on double murder charges may or may not sell his videos. But it already has given his current legal antagonists a new line of attack and representatives of women's groups fresh fodder in their quarrel with the former football star. Evidence of both results could be seen Thursday, the fourth day of Simpson's deposition in the wrongful death lawsuits filed against him by the families and estates of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Lyle Goldman.
BUSINESS
November 15, 1996 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hilton Hotels Corp. and the parent company of Black Entertainment Television said Thursday that they will explore the possibility of opening a Las Vegas hotel and casino designed to lure more African American visitors to the nation's gambling capital. The joint venture would blend the entertainment savvy of BET Holdings Inc.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1999 | PAUL FARHI, WASHINGTON POST
Huey: I used to be a firm believer in the economic philosophy of black nationalism. Jazmine: What's that? Huey: That's the belief that black people have a responsibility to support all black businesses, because that creates a strong black economic base. . . . Those powerful black business people would then act in the best interests of black America. Jazmine: You don't believe in that anymore? Huey: Let's just say BET shot a few holes in that theory.
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