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Black Entertainment Television

BUSINESS
July 11, 1998 | SHARON WAXMAN, WASHINGTON POST
Robert Johnson, owner and founder of the Black Entertainment Television cable network, said Friday that he expects to launch the nation's first African American-owned movie studio by the end of the year. Johnson, whose BET Holdings is one of the most successful black-owned enterprises in the country, plans to produce black-themed movies for release in theaters as well as made-for-TV films for his cable network.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1999
Re "Furor Over BET and Its Programming Isn't Going Away" (by Paul Farhi, Nov. 29): Robert Johnson's view of BET as just another music video forum, featuring primarily videos performed by black artists, is implicit in his statement that there will be no radical changes any time soon in its 60% schedule of videos. That being the case, he misleads the public with the name Black Entertainment Television. Why not be real and call it Black Video Network? Johnson justifies all BET's unethical practices with regards to those people providing labor and professional services to the network as being practical economics.
OPINION
July 31, 2005 | Ben Wasserstein, Ben Wasserstein is an associate editor at New York Magazine.
Day After day, Black Entertainment Television panders to its audience with a mix of crude music videos, cheesy infomercials, UPN repeats and few original shows. The network's rot was brought into sharp relief by the astonishing success of last month's "BET Awards '05," the highest-rated program in the network's history. BET has never met the hopes or expectations of others. It was never a significant buyer of black entertainers' work and didn't carry socially relevant programming.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2000 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cable's Black Entertainment Television has increased fees for stand-up comedians on its series "ComicView," which begins taping its 10th season Aug. 15 and has been the subject of protests by stand-up comics and the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists. Comedians on "ComicView," which showcases new and established African American talent, will receive $1,000 each for appearing on the show, where in seasons past they were paid $150.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2011 | By Greg Braxton, Los Angeles Times
"The Game" used to be a loser. In its three seasons on the CW, the comedy about women involved with players of a fictional San Diego pro football team had a devoted but small following. When producers offered to revamp the series to make it more compatible with the CW's long-form, youth-oriented direction, executives declined, eventually canceling "The Game" in 2009. Less than two years later, "The Game" has turned into a winner with a fresh start on Black Entertainment Television, scoring record ratings in its debut that outdistanced the heavily promoted January premieres of several series, including FX's "Lights Out" and ABC's "Off the Map. " But more significantly, "The Game," which airs Tuesdays and features the original cast, including Tia Mowry Hardrict and Wendy Raquel Robinson, has been a game-changer for Black Entertainment Television.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1997 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even as the television industry seeks approval from the government and the public for its controversial new ratings system, it has failed to convince two of its own. While most cable channels are slowly joining the major broadcast networks in labeling TV shows to help parents guide their children's viewing, two significant exceptions are beginning to stand out: PBS and cable's Black Entertainment Television.
NEWS
January 23, 1996 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
O.J. Live. Finally. No limits. No restrictions. No holds barred. That's the claim, at least, of Black Entertainment Television executives planning to air an interview Wednesday with O.J. Simpson--his first live question-and-answer session since his acquittal on murder charges. Jefferi K. Lee, president of BET Networks, said Monday that he expects the hourlong interview, scheduled to be broadcast Wednesday at 7 p.m. on the cable network, to be informative and forthcoming.
NATIONAL
December 17, 2002 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Besieged Senate Republican leader Trent Lott on cable's Black Entertainment Television? He was forthright. He was incisive. He was earnest. He was strong. He was bold. He was commanding. He was believable. He was intelligent. He was perceptive. He was shrewd. In other words, he was everything viewers could have asked for in an eagerly anticipated televised one-on-one with national political implications. But enough about interviewer Ed Gordon. And Lott? Surely he'd had better nights.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2006 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
WHEN executives from the WB started thinking about a new student drama that would mirror the lives of their 12- to 34-year-old audience, they bypassed the traditional standby, high school. So did the creators of Oxygen's new comedy "Campus Ladies," who sought a setting for adults who dream of recapturing their youth.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2006 | Greg Braxton, Times Staff Writer
REGINALD HUDLIN had a golden year in 2005 before he decided to throw it away. The veteran filmmaker was serving as an executive producer for the new Chris Rock comedy "Everybody Hates Chris," after having directed the pilot episode of the heralded UPN series. "The Boondocks," the animated version of the incendiary comic strip that he helped develop for television, had made the Cartoon Network's Adult Swim slate. "Chris" and "Boondocks" were among the most buzzed-about shows of the fall.
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