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Black Entertainment Television

ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2003 | Johanna Neuman, Times Staff Writer
Robert L. Johnson is hobbling these days, recovering from a ruptured Achilles tendon suffered in a Bahamas boating accident over the Christmas holidays. Many who know him are amused that the man who has ruled his business empire with a kind of raw competitive zeal is showing such unaccustomed weakness.
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SPORTS
December 19, 2002 | From Associated Press
Business know-how, a passion for basketball and a commitment to Charlotte. Robert Johnson had exactly what the NBA wanted, and now the billionaire is on his way to becoming the first black majority owner in major pro sports. The league officially announced Wednesday that Johnson was its choice to buy the NBA's newest expansion team, selecting him over a group that included Larry Bird. "You can't be competitive anywhere in this world if you ignore good, quality talent," Johnson said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2001 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The rap continues over the rap and music videos featured on Black Entertainment Television, or BET. The Council of Presidents, a coalition of leaders from national African American college sororities and fraternities, are scheduled to meet this weekend to discuss continuing concerns over videos airing on the black-themed network that feature scantily clad women and rappers bragging about their money, jewelry and sexual prowess. The group has been worried about the impact of the videos on youth.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2001 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite its financial success and popularity with top black talent, Black Entertainment Television has long come under fire from those inside and outside the black creative community who feel the channel should have been more aggressive in providing meaningful and insightful entertainment by and for blacks.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2001 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The furor over last week's firing of "BET Tonight" host Tavis Smiley, which has prompted an avalanche of protests from his fans, has dramatically escalated, with both Smiley and BET Chairman Robert Johnson separately taking to the airwaves in the last few days to explain their sides.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1999
Re "Furor Over BET and Its Programming Isn't Going Away" (by Paul Farhi, Nov. 29): Robert Johnson's view of BET as just another music video forum, featuring primarily videos performed by black artists, is implicit in his statement that there will be no radical changes any time soon in its 60% schedule of videos. That being the case, he misleads the public with the name Black Entertainment Television. Why not be real and call it Black Video Network? Johnson justifies all BET's unethical practices with regards to those people providing labor and professional services to the network as being practical economics.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1999 | PAUL FARHI, WASHINGTON POST
Huey: I used to be a firm believer in the economic philosophy of black nationalism. Jazmine: What's that? Huey: That's the belief that black people have a responsibility to support all black businesses, because that creates a strong black economic base. . . . Those powerful black business people would then act in the best interests of black America. Jazmine: You don't believe in that anymore? Huey: Let's just say BET shot a few holes in that theory.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1999 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An open letter signed by more than 100 comedians, including Jay Leno and Tim Allen, appeared in Hollywood trade newspapers and publications in Atlanta and Washington, D.C., on Thursday, protesting Black Entertainment Television's stand-up comedy show "Comic View." The action, sponsored by the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists, is the latest move in an ongoing effort to pressure BET into better compensating comedians who appear on "Comic View."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1999 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The faded brick warehouse on a dirty and nearly hidden street near downtown Los Angeles looks like the last place in the world for a Hollywood revolution. The building, located just a stone's throw from the Lacy Street Cabaret, with its promise of "LIVE NUDE GIRLS," couldn't look more weathered and bland. The painted brick that reads "Dyer Industrial Textiles" has seen better days. Only the trailers, cable and cars that line the street hint that there is more happening within.
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