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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1990
The Times, after self-righteously proclaiming that "all Americans must be held equally accountable," and noting "this nation's sad history of disparate legal treatment of blacks and whites," nonetheless calls for "maximum sentence--a $100,000 fine and a year in jail," notwithstanding that "first offenders rarely do jail time on misdemeanor convictions." When The Times states that many "black Americans openly doubt the government would have gone to such great lengths to pursue a powerful white man," thus precluding the notion that any non-black Americans might share this notion, the inevitable conclusion is that "his (Mayor Barry's)
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OPINION
April 3, 2006
Although there may be truth in Jonah Goldberg's view that the Congressional Black Caucus doesn't always take positions that square with the majority opinion of the black community (Opinion, March 30), I would remind Goldberg that being the "conscience of the Congress" means not always making the most popular choices but making the morally appropriate ones. If he examined the positions of white members of the House Republican Caucus, he would find that although a majority of their constituents oppose continuing the current course in Iraq, congressional Republicans continue to support it. Likewise, the Medicare drug benefit plan that they enacted.
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OPINION
April 3, 2006
Although there may be truth in Jonah Goldberg's view that the Congressional Black Caucus doesn't always take positions that square with the majority opinion of the black community (Opinion, March 30), I would remind Goldberg that being the "conscience of the Congress" means not always making the most popular choices but making the morally appropriate ones. If he examined the positions of white members of the House Republican Caucus, he would find that although a majority of their constituents oppose continuing the current course in Iraq, congressional Republicans continue to support it. Likewise, the Medicare drug benefit plan that they enacted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2004 | Jill Leovy, Times Staff Writer
The televised police beating of a black suspected car thief last week will test two years of efforts by LAPD Chief William J. Bratton to win over the city's African Americans. But it also strikes at Bratton's deeper and more ambitious agenda: fixing America's race problem by fixing its crime problem. "What is it that keeps this country so on edge?" asked Bratton. "It's race."
OPINION
June 13, 1999 | Erin J. Aubry, Erin J. Aubry is a staff writer at LA Weekly
Throughout his long political career, Nate Holden has traded eagerly on the image of himself as a political pugilist, someone who may look the worse for wear but always comes out in the 15th round swinging, scoring an improbable knockout. This electoral season, it was Holden against the world.
OPINION
August 19, 1990
In "A Quarter-Century of Slipping Backward" (Commentary, Aug. 10) Profs. Melvin Oliver, Walter Farrell and James Johnson sing an all-too-familiar refrain regarding the plight of African Americans in the Watts area. It is a song which many African American leaders chant not only about Watts but also about similar areas in the nation. The main lyric is: "Let's blame all of our problems on someone else." It is the fostering of that attitude which, along with real and alleged discrimination, establishes the foundation for the retardation of social and economic progress in Watts and similar areas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1993
The essential thoughts of Cynthia Tucker (Commentary, Oct. 5) and George Weigel (Oct. 6) need to be joined. Tucker had the courage to expose the harm that some of the so-called community leaders of ghettos (and I add barrios) plus a few misguided academics and rap artists are doing to some of the youth in our inner cities. Weigel points to the importance of morals to the survival of society and a successful life. Those who by their negative rantings about society in general tend to discourage or put down those who try to excel.
NEWS
March 31, 1991 | From Reuters
South Africa's two most powerful black leaders said Saturday that they accepted some blame for failing to stop their supporters from fighting in the black townships. But African National Congress leader Nelson Mandela and Inkatha Freedom Party leader Mangosuthu Gatsha Buthelezi conceded that their five-hour discussion failed to remove key differences and they unveiled no dramatic new initiatives.
OPINION
November 1, 2003
Kerman Maddox's "Blood and Silence" (Opinion, Oct. 26) was the best article I've ever read regarding the horrible acts I saw up close and personal while growing up in Compton, where the Bloods and Crips ran rampant. I've seen too many innocent lives taken for wearing a certain color, which doesn't make any sense at all. Whenever there are incidents between cops and young black males, either assaults or deaths (which doesn't happen that much), folks like Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Los Angeles)
OPINION
October 27, 1996 | Stanley Crouch, Stanley Crouch, a 1993 recipient of a MacArthur Foundation fellowship, is the author of "The All-American Skin Game" (Pantheon)
Given all that we know about governmental hanky-panky, it is not farfetched for black leaders to swallow allegations that the Central Intelligence Agency was involved in drug deals that resulted in South-Central suffering from a flood of crack cocaine.
OPINION
November 1, 2003
Kerman Maddox's "Blood and Silence" (Opinion, Oct. 26) was the best article I've ever read regarding the horrible acts I saw up close and personal while growing up in Compton, where the Bloods and Crips ran rampant. I've seen too many innocent lives taken for wearing a certain color, which doesn't make any sense at all. Whenever there are incidents between cops and young black males, either assaults or deaths (which doesn't happen that much), folks like Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Los Angeles)
OPINION
June 20, 1999
Re "Which Path Will Black Leadership Take in L.A.?" Opinion, June 13: I am the executive director of a grass-roots coalition based in South L.A. We have spent the last nine years walking door to door talking with thousands of residents in the 8th, 9th and 10th districts. Repairing potholes and paving streets are nice improvements but these issues have never surfaced as burning concerns. The most serious concerns raised by neighborhood residents are the numerous abandoned buildings, problem liquor stores, motels, recycling centers, etc., that attract crime, e.g. drug trafficking, drug use, prostitution.
OPINION
June 13, 1999 | Erin J. Aubry, Erin J. Aubry is a staff writer at LA Weekly
Throughout his long political career, Nate Holden has traded eagerly on the image of himself as a political pugilist, someone who may look the worse for wear but always comes out in the 15th round swinging, scoring an improbable knockout. This electoral season, it was Holden against the world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1999 | AGNES DIGGS
U.S. Rep. Maxine Waters said a thing or two Friday about what it means to be a leader in her keynote address to the Young Black Leadership Conference at Cal State Northridge. Waters, a Los Angeles Democrat, touched on AIDS, drugs, computer literacy, hip-hop music and grandparents-as-caregivers in her speech. She emphasized her commitment to keep abreast of the concerns of youth. "I'm delighted to be here, growing old, but--at least--still in touch.
OPINION
October 27, 1996 | Stanley Crouch, Stanley Crouch, a 1993 recipient of a MacArthur Foundation fellowship, is the author of "The All-American Skin Game" (Pantheon)
Given all that we know about governmental hanky-panky, it is not farfetched for black leaders to swallow allegations that the Central Intelligence Agency was involved in drug deals that resulted in South-Central suffering from a flood of crack cocaine.
NEWS
January 18, 1996 | LAURA BLUMENFELD, THE WASHINGTON POST
The father speaks in rhyme; the son rattles off statistics. The father wears elegant clothes; the son bought six cheap, identical navy suits so he doesn't waste "brain energy" getting dressed. The father got a D in preaching class because he refused to write down his A-plus sermons; the son totes around every speech he has ever delivered, all filed and some laminated, in a black canvas bag.
NEWS
September 19, 1994 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Congressional Black Caucus' 24th Annual Legislative Conference is ground zero of black political meetings. From its epicenter in the serpentine lobby of the Washington Convention Center to its informal outposts in nearby hotel suites and cocktail lounges, the luminaries of black political life sparkle with the prestige that comes to those holding an elected or appointed position in the federal government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1994
Roger Wilkins has it wrong (Opinion, Feb. 6). The paradox is not Louis Farrakhan. The paradox is mainstream black leadership. They did not embrace Farrakhan because they liked him or agreed with his message. They embraced him because large segments of black America did. If Farrakhan seized the leadership high ground, it was because mainstream black leaders fumbled the ball. During the 1970s and 1980s, the NAACP, Urban League and the Congressional Black Caucus crafted a myopic agenda that appealed to upwardly mobile black business people and professionals, while excluding the black poor.
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