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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2012 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Calvin Hicks, a photographer who documented the nuances of daily African American life in Los Angeles and co-founded an association and gallery to preserve and display the work of black photographers, died May 20 at Ronald Reagan-UCLA Medical Center after a long battle with cancer, said his friend B. Scottye Price. He was 71. When he struggled to find a space to exhibit his photographs, Hicks co-founded Black Gallery in 1984 in the old Santa Barbara Plaza in Baldwin Hills. "If you were a person of color, you weren't getting very many shows in the area.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | By Emily Mann
Many people know that Nelson Mandela's life inspired novels, poems, plays and films, but few people know how powerful his effect on the theater was and how powerful the theater's effect was on him. The theater served as a mirror to Mandela, each side influencing and reflecting the other, placing them both in time. At the height of the apartheid era, the Market Theater in Johannesburg and the Space Theatre in Cape Town, both defiantly nonracial venues in a racially divided country, produced shattering plays about black life under the apartheid regime.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2000 | From a Times Staff Writer
Roland Charles, a photographer and curator who founded the Black Photographers Assn. of California and ran the influential Black Gallery in the Crenshaw district for more than a decade, has died. Charles died Friday of complications from a heart attack suffered while jogging in Pan Pacific Park on April 27. He was 61. Born near New Orleans, Charles came to Southern California in the early 1960s after serving in the Air Force.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2013 | By Doug Smith
Of all the memories of the 1960s, nothing stirs as much fondness as the magic of AM radio pouring out the rough-cut exuberance of doo-wop, the English invasion, surf music and anti-war ballads. We all had our favorite call signs: KRLA, "Color Radio" KFWB, 93/KHJ. And then, there was KGFJ, the station that carried the rich sounds of rhythm and blues. I was reminded of all that recently when I heard from Master Blaster, the ambassador of soul who brought singers like James Brown to the mix of counterculture, psychedelic, anti-war and hurdy-gurdy sounds that paced that chaotic time.
NEWS
November 11, 1993
Our Authors Study Club, the Los Angeles branch of the Assn. for the Study of Afro-American Life and History, is accepting entries from undergraduate and graduate college students for its annual Afro-American Life History essay contest. Essays may be submitted on any topic that explores the life, history and culture of African-Americans, club President Delores Nehemiah said. Entries should have appropriate documentation and be written in standard college style, with footnotes.
BUSINESS
July 7, 1987 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
For several years now, Pepsi has pumped many millions of dollars into signing big-name black celebrity spokespersons such as Michael Jackson, Lionel Richie and Tina Turner. That will continue. But the president of the black-owned advertising agency that has just taken over Pepsi's estimated $3-million minority advertising account says that Pepsi will soon test other, far less costly, ways of reaching the black consumer: black life style commercials.
NEWS
November 13, 1994 | ERIN J. AUBRY
It is an unlikely spot for a fine art gallery, the far end of a sprawling horseshoe-shaped shopping center that is populated mostly by beauty salons, cleaners and small markets. Yet the Black Gallery, founded to showcase rarely seen talent, is used to being something of an oddity. Now in its 10th year at the Santa Barbara Plaza, the gallery prides itself on providing a haven for photographers who strive to capture aspects of black life largely absent from the gritty pages of daily newspapers.
NEWS
September 15, 1989 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Lorenz Bell Graham, a former missionary, probation officer and social worker credited with bringing realistic black characters to young people's literature by building many of his tales around the English folk patois of African peoples, has died in West Covina. Graham, known particularly for his "Town" series about a young black's struggle to overcome racism as he becomes a doctor, was 87 when he died Monday of cancer, his daughter, Ruth Siegrist, said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1989 | From Associated Press
The National Baptist Convention U.S.A. Inc. plans to launch a cable TV news magazine on black life and achievements, the denomination's president, the Rev. T. J. Jemison, announced. It will deal with "education, politics, civics--not just religion--all the problems of the world," said Jemison, who was in Nashville for the denomination's annual meeting and dedication of its new $10-million Baptist World Center. The denomination is the country's third largest Protestant body--7.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Vincent Smith, 74, an artist whose expressionist paintings, murals and book illustrations portrayed black life, died of lymphoma complicated by pneumonia Dec. 27 in New York City. A figurative painter prominent in the Black Arts movement of the 1960s and 1970s, Smith had more than two dozen one-man shows, and was represented in more than 30 group shows over the last three decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2013 | By Holly Myers
The large, bold, unabashedly painterly paintings of Henry Taylor find a fitting stage at Blum & Poe. Spaciously hung in high-ceiling rooms, interspersed with a handful of found object sculptures, the paintings have a potent presence, with a rich and distinctly human character that one rarely sees now as a mainstay in painting. The work hews close to a strain of African American painting tracing back to Jacob Lawrence and Romare Bearden, one that drew simultaneously from folk art and modernism in its depictions of black life in America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2012 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Calvin Hicks, a photographer who documented the nuances of daily African American life in Los Angeles and co-founded an association and gallery to preserve and display the work of black photographers, died May 20 at Ronald Reagan-UCLA Medical Center after a long battle with cancer, said his friend B. Scottye Price. He was 71. When he struggled to find a space to exhibit his photographs, Hicks co-founded Black Gallery in 1984 in the old Santa Barbara Plaza in Baldwin Hills. "If you were a person of color, you weren't getting very many shows in the area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Willie Robert Middlebrook, a photographer who sought to enlarge public perceptions of the African American community through painterly depictions of its people and places, died Saturday at Brotman Medical Center in Culver City. He was 54. The cause was complications of a stroke suffered last month, said his daughter, Jessica Middlebrook. Middlebrook's death came just a week after the unveiling at the new Expo/Crenshaw Metro station of one of his largest public installations, a series of 24 mosaic panels based on his photographs.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2008 | Robert Lloyd, Times Television Critic
I have a kind of collect-them-all affection for the PBS biographical series "American Masters," now in its 22nd year and happily catholic in its definition of who qualifies as an American Master. Jasper Johns, Julia Child and James Brown, to name just three whose names start with J. Some editions are better than others, of course, and few are really critical of their subjects, even when allowing a peek at the warts -- their American mastery is expressed and explicated, yet always taken as read.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2008 | Jocelyn Y. Stewart, Times Staff Writer
In the script for the landmark 1964 film "Nothing but a Man," actor Ivan Dixon saw something familiar in the character Duff Anderson. Duff was a railroad worker in love with Josie, a schoolteacher and minister's daughter who lived in an Alabama town. The story of Duff's attempts to live with dignity and to love, despite racial injustice, was an honest depiction of black life in America, Dixon said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2008 | Jill Leovy, Times Staff Writer
For 20 years, Oran Z. Belgrave has been looking for that box. It's the one the first black G.I. Joe doll came in back in the mid-1960s. He'll pay $200 when he finds it. But that's it -- really it. Belgrave isn't looking to buy more things. His obsession with collecting African American-themed antiques and memorabilia has consumed the better part of his life, and now, Belgrave said, "I have to hold myself down." His place is so crammed, a person can barely walk through it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Frank E. Bolden, one of two accredited black war correspondents during World War II, died Aug. 28 in Pittsburgh of undisclosed causes. He was 90. Born in Washington, Pa., he was one of three sons of the city's first black mail carrier. Although he earned top grades at the University of Pittsburgh, racial prejudice thwarted his plans to pursue a career as a doctor or teacher, so Bolden went to work for the Pittsburgh Courier, then one of the most influential black newspapers in the country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2006 | Peter Y. Hong, Times Staff Writer
Three Highland Park gang members convicted of deadly hate-crime attacks against African Americans were sentenced to life in prison without parole Monday. The members of the Latino gang the Avenues had been prosecuted for breaking federal hate-crime laws -- statutes typically used against white supremacist groups. They were convicted of carrying out a conspiracy that violated their victims' rights to live and walk in Highland Park. The conspiracy included several killings.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2005 | Jacqueline Trescott, Washington Post
When black actors and actresses were still relegated to the maid and butler roles in movies, John H. Johnson knew black readers wanted to know about the lives of black celebrities. And he knew black readers wanted to dream a little, perhaps to copy a table setting of Marian Anderson, to read about the achievements of black people all over the world.
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