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HOME & GARDEN
January 20, 2001 | U.C. MASTER GARDENERS
Question: How do you make tea from the Camellia sinensis bush? G.D., Santa Ana Answer: Tea is made only from the bush's flush of new-growth shoots, which regularly appear year-round. There are three main kinds of regular (not herbal) teas: black, oolong and green. These are not products of different bushes but of different processing methods. For black tea, leaves are spread on shelves (withering racks), where air circulates around them to remove moisture, leaving them soft and flexible.
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FOOD
April 26, 1990 | JOAN DRAKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All tea leaves come from the same plant species, but different growing conditions, processing and blending create distinctive tea varieties, including the three major categories--black, green and oolong. Black tea is created by drying and fermenting the leaves, which are then fired to halt fermentation. It is this final process that turns them black. Green tea is steamed immediately after harvest to prevent fermentation.
FOOD
December 16, 2001 | BARBARA HANSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
We're told that Americans are evolving into serious tea drinkers rather than just chilling out with iced tea or dipping an occasional bag into a mug of hot water. Still, the teas most in demand are sweetened, flavored and novelty teas--witness the craze for Thai tea, then Indian chai and now boba tea with its bouncing tapioca balls. Diet teas have drawn attention. And green tea is on a roll as a health and beauty aid.
FOOD
May 12, 1994 | BARBARA HANSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Something new is brewing for American tea drinkers--rare teas from Vietnam that will be ready for distribution here this summer. The specialty teas, some exotically flavored and packaged in handcrafted, folk-art containers, are worlds apart from the mass-produced, serviceable tea used for everyday drinking in Vietnam.
BUSINESS
May 25, 1989 | BARBARA HANSEN, Times Staff Writer
Much of the tea that Americans sip comes from plantations around Munnar, a cool, hilly town in the South Indian state of Kerala. Munnar is the southern domain of Tata Tea Ltd., the world's largest integrated tea company: It grows, processes, packs and distributes tea, unlike companies that merely buy and blend it. Tata is India's leading manufacturer of instant tea, and the United States is its main market. Some 1.5 million pounds of tea powder are shipped annually to a Tata factory in Plant City, Fla., near Tampa, for final processing.
TRAVEL
April 18, 2004 | Irene Woodbury, Special to The Times
I spent a great deal of time at St. Martin-in-the-Fields Church on a recent trip to London. But I wasn't praying. I had tea in the church's dramatic 18th century Cafe-in-the-Crypt. I took in a free lunchtime concert and a candlelit nighttime performance. And I browsed endlessly in the gift shop, art gallery, and covered crafts market in the courtyard. Where else can a visitor find such an outstanding array of cultural and commercial attractions in a house of worship?
NEWS
February 3, 2005 | Liane Bonin, Special to The Times
My tiny acupuncturist Victoria, whom I affectionately call Sadistic Needle-Poking Dragon Lady only because I know I could take her in a fight, waggled a finger in my face. "No more coffee!" she barked. "It's bad for your qi!" Just thinking about it now, I get a chill down my spine. Which would be nicely taken care of by a vanilla nonfat latte, but I digress. It's not that I've ever been a daily coffee drinker, and I'm certainly not hooked on caffeine.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1998 | IRENE GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Did you know all tea comes from the same plant? Whether it's in Lipton bags or the fancy loose-leaf oolong variety, all tea originates from a green bush called Camellia sinensis. Also noteworthy is that the United States imports practically all of its tea, mostly from Argentina, and the quality isn't that great. There's only one tea plantation in this country--in Charleston, S.C.,--and it serves mainly as a tourist attraction.
TRAVEL
March 2, 2008 | Kevin Capp, Special to The Times
This city is so caffeinated you can hardly blame an outsider for viewing it as a rainy-day parade of Starbucks, the coffee-chain colossus that began here. Java shops large and small rule Seattle, but, if the personnel shake-ups at two of its coffee kings are any indication, a backlash of sorts may be brewing. Seattle-based java giant Tully's Coffee announced the resignation of five top executives, including its chief executive; on Feb.
FOOD
November 1, 2000 | LAURA CALDER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In my family, we were tea drinkers, an admission that sounds almost quaint these days, given the coffee craze that has swept the continent over the past few decades. Somehow, my family slipped through that grip of mass social conversion and kept right on drinking tea as if coffee had never been invented. As a result, I grew up rather archaically knowing what a proper cup of tea tastes like, and I was brought up to be fussy about it, as only a tea drinker can be.
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