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Blacker House

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REAL ESTATE
October 27, 1985
Is it any wonder that neighborhood organizations are so ready to do battle with developers when they see many developers as cut in the Barton English mode. This moneyed man is apparently quite capable of desecrating anything he can buy (Oct. 20) without regard to aesthetic or historic value. In our present mode of hellbent development, communities often find themselves on the losing end of an avalanche perpetrated by careless developers and supported by local governments which see only tax base and campaign funds as worthwhile.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2013 | By Jason Song, Los Angeles Times
The courtyard at Blacker House at Caltech was quiet at 6:59 a.m. Wednesday, the empty concrete space littered with several splintered wooden pallets, three large tires, a crowbar and sledgehammer. A minute later, the crescendo of Wagner's "Ride of the Valkyries" came blaring out of second-floor speakers. Students began to emerge sleepily from their rooms, messy haired and mostly without shoes, their shoulders hunched against the early morning chill as they listened to about five minutes of music.
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NEWS
October 17, 1985
The final chapter in the story of attempts by preservationists to regain control over the landmark Blacker House appears to have been written, and the ending is not a happy one for the home team. Barton English, a wealthy Texas rancher who bought the house last May for $1.
HOME & GARDEN
March 26, 2011
Woodworkers will tell you that it's incredibly easy to ruin a beautiful, handcrafted design with a lousy finish. Brian Miller, the wood finisher for Don and Natalie Kick's house, should know. In the industry for 36 years, he is an expert in centuries'-old methods of coloring wood with dyes and chemicals. "Coloring wood is a dying art these days," Miller said, no pun intended. "Everyone wants to stain wood ? and I'll do that too if a client wants it. But stains hide the grain because they deposit pigments into the wood that prevent light from penetrating.
NEWS
January 21, 1988
Regarding Barton English's plans to strip the historic Blacker House of its original doors and replace them with replicas (Times, Jan. 7): While it is true that English owns the deed to the Blacker House, he doesn't own the house any more than an art collector owns his current collection. He has been entrusted to preserve and maintain one of the Greene brothers' finest examples of bungalow architecture. He has no right to remove the stained-glass doors, which demonstrate so well the appreciation of nature that the Craftsman movement represented.
NEWS
July 11, 1985 | DEBORAH HASTINGS, Times Staff Writer
Pasadena Heritage offered an undisclosed amount of money this week to Texas rancher Barton English for the right to resell the landmark Blacker House designed by pioneering California architects Charles and Henry Greene.
NEWS
June 20, 1985 | ALAN MALTUN, Times Staff Writer
Cultural heritage groups are negotiating with Texas rancher Barton English to recover fixtures he had removed from the Blacker House and to find a new buyer for the landmark Craftsman-style residence. English, a rancher from Stonewall, Tex., who collects turn-of-the-century decorative art pieces, purchased the house for $1.2 million on May 1, and a few days later removed all of its original light fixtures.
NEWS
July 9, 1987 | ASHLEY DUNN, Times Staff Writer
For the past week, a small group of residents in Oak Knoll, a wealthy neighborhood of palm-lined streets and manicured lawns, has been standing vigil over the front doors of a house on the corner of Wentworth and Hillcrest avenues. These are no ordinary doors, and this is no ordinary neighborhood watch. The neighbors have been joined in keeping an eye on the mahogany-and-stained-glass doors by a small squad of historical preservationists who circle the block at irregular intervals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1985 | ALAN MALTUN, Times Staff Writer
The Pasadena Board of City Directors on Wednesday adopted an emergency ordinance to halt what preservationists are calling the "rape" of a landmark turn-of-the-century home designed by pioneering California architects Charles and Henry Greene. The measure is aimed at stopping a Texas rancher from removing valuable fixtures from the 78-year-old Blacker House. The man recently bought the house for $1.2 million and already has stripped it of all of its roughly 50 original lighting fixtures.
HOME & GARDEN
July 1, 2004 | Barbara King
MINUTES AFTER taking leave of the late afternoon aggression of cars cramming the 110, an unfamiliar stillness settles on the landscape. You might wonder if you've momentarily lost your reflexes or your senses, here on Hillcrest Avenue in Pasadena. Or maybe it's not the street or the neighborhood at all, but the house just up ahead, with its curious out-of-time aspect, its suggestion of other worlds. Where, exactly? The Far East? The Eastern seaboard? A lakeside lodge in a Western mountain range?
HOME & GARDEN
October 17, 2009 | Debra Prinzing
Tim Celeski has become something of a darling among Arts & Crafts collectors. Owners of the Blacker House and the Robinson House, two Greene and Greene residences in Pasadena, have commissioned more than 100 of his pieces. "My customer base includes lovers of Arts & Crafts homes, but also garden enthusiasts who want something that's both classic and contemporary," Celeski says. Crafted from mahogany and jarra, a dark-colored, durable outdoor wood from Australia, his collection has expanded to six indoor and outdoor styles.
NEWS
July 13, 2005
Architectural timeline -- A graphic in Thursday's Home section showing a timeline on the architectural history of Los Angeles included two incorrect photo credits. A photo of the Blacker House in Pasadena, credited to the Monacelli Press, should have been credited to Stefano Paltera for The Times. A photo of R.M. Schindler's Kings Road house in West Hollywood, credited to Paltera, should have been credited to Grant Mudford and Harry N. Abrams Inc.
HOME & GARDEN
July 1, 2004 | Barbara King
MINUTES AFTER taking leave of the late afternoon aggression of cars cramming the 110, an unfamiliar stillness settles on the landscape. You might wonder if you've momentarily lost your reflexes or your senses, here on Hillcrest Avenue in Pasadena. Or maybe it's not the street or the neighborhood at all, but the house just up ahead, with its curious out-of-time aspect, its suggestion of other worlds. Where, exactly? The Far East? The Eastern seaboard? A lakeside lodge in a Western mountain range?
HOME & GARDEN
July 1, 2004 | Tina Daunt, Times Staff Writer
The rescue of the Blacker House, Pasadena's grandest Craftsman, is less a fairy tale than a detective story. It even includes a "crime scene" -- at least, that's how locals describe what they call "The Texas Chainsaw Massacre," the night the house was stripped of valuable windows, doors and lighting fixtures by a Texan known as "Black Bart."
NEWS
October 5, 2000 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 1907 Blacker House in Pasadena rises proudly on the corner of Hillcrest and Wentworth avenues. Its serene silhouette gives little clue of the long period of abuse, disrepair and neglect it had endured until Harvey and Ellen Knell purchased the property six years ago. Designed at the turn of the 19th century by architects Charles and Henry Greene, the house is described internationally as the crown jewel of the turn-of-the-century Arts and Crafts movement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1998 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Built for a lumber baron, it was fit for a lord. The Blacker House of Pasadena has been called an "ultimate California bungalow" and is considered a masterpiece of the Arts and Crafts movement. On Saturday, when this landmark was unveiled to architecture lovers, there was nothing in its artful restoration to suggest it had ever endured the now-legendary caper that preservationists dubbed "The Texas Chainsaw Massacre."
NEWS
October 5, 2000 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 1907 Blacker House in Pasadena rises proudly on the corner of Hillcrest and Wentworth avenues. Its serene silhouette gives little clue of the long period of abuse, disrepair and neglect it had endured until Harvey and Ellen Knell purchased the property six years ago. Designed at the turn of the 19th century by architects Charles and Henry Greene, the house is described internationally as the crown jewel of the turn-of-the-century Arts and Crafts movement.
HOME & GARDEN
March 26, 2011
Woodworkers will tell you that it's incredibly easy to ruin a beautiful, handcrafted design with a lousy finish. Brian Miller, the wood finisher for Don and Natalie Kick's house, should know. In the industry for 36 years, he is an expert in centuries'-old methods of coloring wood with dyes and chemicals. "Coloring wood is a dying art these days," Miller said, no pun intended. "Everyone wants to stain wood ? and I'll do that too if a client wants it. But stains hide the grain because they deposit pigments into the wood that prevent light from penetrating.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1989 | SAM HALL KAPLAN, Times Design Critic
The board of directors of Frank Lloyd Wright's historic Ennis-Brown House has decided to strip the landmark of artwork designed by the architect if it cannot obtain funds elsewhere to make needed repairs. The board of the nonprofit Trust for Preservation of Cultural Heritage, which owns the house, said it hopes it will not come to that, but it has run out of options after years of frustration in trying to raise funds. The last and largest of Wright's experimental mock Mesoamerican block structures, the monumental house on Glendower Avenue on a hillside in Los Feliz was built in 1924.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1988 | ASHLEY DUNN, Times Staff Writer
Pasadena's landmark Blacker House, which was stripped of its treasured light fixtures by a Texas cattleman days after he bought it in 1985, has been sold to a local couple who vow to preserve its historic character. The 81-year-old house, often called the "ultimate California bungalow," was sold for an undisclosed amount Tuesday to John and Dorrie Poole, who grew up not far from the home designed by Charles and Henry Greene.
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