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Blacks Health

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1998 | MARCIDA DODSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even when African American women with breast cancer receive identical health care to white women, black women are more likely to die of the disease, a researcher said Wednesday. Further research is needed to explain why, but the reason cannot be attributed solely to unequal health care, said Barbara Wojcik, senior statistician with the U.S. Army's Center for Healthcare Education and Studies.
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NEWS
February 15, 1991 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unexpected finding, a Department of Veterans Affairs study released Thursday suggests that minorities infected with the AIDS virus may not benefit to the same extent as whites from early use of the antiviral drug AZT. Results from the study, presented to a Food and Drug Administration advisory committee, indicated that early use of AZT helped whites, but the evidence appeared "neutral or favoring late AZT treatment in minority patients," the department said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1989 | Compiled from staff and wire reports
Black and Latino drug addicts may be more likely to become infected with the AIDS virus because they frequent "shooting galleries" more commonly than Anglos, researchers reported. A new study involving 452 intravenous drug users in New York City found that those who were black and Latino were much more likely to share needles with strangers in illicit drug havens than were their Anglo counterparts. "This is a very, very high-risk behavior," said Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1988 | AMY STEVENS, Times Staff Writer
The nation's oldest association of black physicians, adding its voice to a growing debate among AIDS experts, doctors and police, said Thursday that it opposes the unconditional distribution of clean needles to drug addicts. The association's statement puts it at odds with many AIDS service groups, such as the Minority AIDS Project in Los Angeles, which have advocated giving out sanitary drug paraphernalia in an effort to curb an AIDS epidemic among intravenous drug users.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1999 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acknowledging the disproportionate impact of AIDS on African Americans, a coalition of ministers unveiled a plan Wednesday to enlist the power of the pulpit in the fight against the disease. The goal of the effort--which is being carried out in partnership with the California Department of Health Services--is to encourage Christian ministers to inform congregations about HIV / AIDS prevention. "None of us can do everything," said Bishop Kenneth C.
NEWS
April 9, 1991 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Americans generally are living longer than ever, but the life expectancy of blacks is continuing to shorten alarmingly, the Department of Health and Human Services reported Monday. In its annual compilation of statistics on the population's well-being, the department said that life expectancy in the nation as a whole rose to a record 75.2 years in 1990. For blacks, it said, life expectancy fell to 69.2 years, although no figures for previous years were provided.
NEWS
March 11, 1990 | From Associated Press
Harlem residents fed up with billboards enticing them to buy alcohol and cigarettes splashed paint over more than a dozen of the signs Saturday. Singing "Yield Not to Temptation," about 50 members of the Abyssinian Baptist Church marched with buckets and paint rollers down a street in Harlem, a section of New York where a recent study found that black men have shorter life spans than men in Bangladesh. "Alcohol kills more people than heroin, marijuana, crack and cocaine together," said the Rev.
NEWS
October 28, 1998 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton today will announce $156 million in new government funding to better combat the AIDS epidemic among blacks and other minorities, administration officials said Tuesday. The targeted money will go to help develop new strategies for preventing the spread of AIDS among blacks and other ethnic groups and to improve community services and treatment for black and Latino patients. Rep.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Inner-city blacks suffer disproportionately from asthma and there has been an "alarming" increase in the disease among them, physicians said last week.
NEWS
February 6, 1991 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Socioeconomic and environmental factors, not genetic differences, account for the greater prevalence of high blood pressure in blacks as compared to whites, according to a study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore. The study in today's Journal of the American Medical Assn. examined data from 457 blacks on the darkness of their skin color, which the researchers said can be used as an indirect measure of the percentage of black ancestry.
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