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NEWS
July 29, 1989 | ERIC HARRISON, Times Staff Writer
Things have quieted down around here lately. The mayor is sleeping at home again. The yelling and name-calling have all but faded into memory. The barricades have even come down at City Hall. It's hard to say things are normal, though.
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NEWS
August 3, 1994 | From Associated Press
Rep. Alan Wheat became the first black person nominated to statewide office in Missouri on Tuesday, winning the Democratic nomination for the seat of retiring Sen. John C. Danforth. Former Gov. John Ashcroft easily captured the GOP nomination. In Detroit, Democratic Rep. John Conyers, chairman of the House Government Operations Committee and the most senior black congressman, turned back his first serious primary challenge in 30 years.
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NEWS
August 19, 1993 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Both tempers and the temperature sizzled in Crystal City High School's auditorium when a meeting between flooded residents and representatives of relief agencies turned into an angry debate, with black flood victims charging that the town is discriminating against them as it parcels out its disaster assistance. Like many cities and towns along the Mississippi and Missouri rivers, Crystal City was caught off guard by the size of flood.
NEWS
August 19, 1993 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Both tempers and the temperature sizzled in Crystal City High School's auditorium when a meeting between flooded residents and representatives of relief agencies turned into an angry debate, with black flood victims charging that the town is discriminating against them as it parcels out its disaster assistance. Like many cities and towns along the Mississippi and Missouri rivers, Crystal City was caught off guard by the size of flood.
NEWS
August 1, 1991 | J. DUNCAN MOORE Jr., SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In this city, like so many others, violent death among inner-city youth has become so routine that people hardly notice any more. But, since May, City Councilwoman Carol Coe and a handful of civic leaders have laid a plan to engage the machinery of law enforcement, social services and media saturation to prove it doesn't have to be that way. They have resolved to make August a month without murders. It's a tall order.
NEWS
August 3, 1994 | From Associated Press
Rep. Alan Wheat became the first black person nominated to statewide office in Missouri on Tuesday, winning the Democratic nomination for the seat of retiring Sen. John C. Danforth. Former Gov. John Ashcroft easily captured the GOP nomination. In Detroit, Democratic Rep. John Conyers, chairman of the House Government Operations Committee and the most senior black congressman, turned back his first serious primary challenge in 30 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2001 | JAMES R. ROSS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Hon. James R. Ross, a retired Orange County Superior Court judge, is a great-grandson of legendary outlaw Jesse James and the author of "I Jesse James," a four-generational saga about his family. "American Outlaws," the latest screen version of the James gang saga, opened Aug. 17. The following are Judge Ross' comments on the film and the myth and truths of Jesse James' life. How has the truth of the life of Jesse James become so maligned and how have so many myths arisen?
NEWS
January 1, 2001 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As civil rights leaders seek to mobilize opposition to Sen. John Ashcroft's nomination for attorney general, many are adopting a two-word rallying cry: Ronnie White. White is a judge in Ashcroft's home state of Missouri whose elevation to the federal bench was rejected by the Senate in 1999 after Ashcroft mounted a vigorous and unusual lobbying effort, branding the judge "pro-criminal."
NEWS
December 28, 1988 | ERIC HARRISON, Times Staff Writer
When Orrin Murray was a little boy, his father would take him in the buggy down to old Quindaro. It was a ghost town even then, a collection of brick and limestone buildings overgrown with weeds. Scavengers had carted away much of the town piece by piece and mudslides had buried much of what was left, but Murray's father would point out what landmarks could still be seen.
NEWS
August 1, 1991 | J. DUNCAN MOORE Jr., SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In this city, like so many others, violent death among inner-city youth has become so routine that people hardly notice any more. But, since May, City Councilwoman Carol Coe and a handful of civic leaders have laid a plan to engage the machinery of law enforcement, social services and media saturation to prove it doesn't have to be that way. They have resolved to make August a month without murders. It's a tall order.
NEWS
July 29, 1989 | ERIC HARRISON, Times Staff Writer
Things have quieted down around here lately. The mayor is sleeping at home again. The yelling and name-calling have all but faded into memory. The barricades have even come down at City Hall. It's hard to say things are normal, though.
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