Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBlacks Orange County
IN THE NEWS

Blacks Orange County

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1999 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Webster J. Guillory is a man accustomed to challenges. As the new assessor, he becomes the first African American to hold a countywide elected office. "He will be a beacon for others of the black community to follow and to encourage," said Ernesta Wright, a businesswoman in Santa Ana and member of the Black Chamber of Commerce of Orange County.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1998 | KATHRYN BOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The 100 Black Men of Orange County, the local chapter of an international organization that seeks to improve the quality of life for blacks and other minorities, saluted the late Florence Griffith Joyner at its fourth annual Black & White Ball on Monday. Before 600 people at the Hyatt Regency Irvine, the organization paid tribute to the Olympic gold medalist, who died in her sleep Sept. 21 at her Mission Viejo home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1998 | LESLEY WRIGHT
The largest meeting of professional African American women in the county will meet for the 19th annual Bethune Recognition Luncheon on Saturday to honor the contributions of Lake Forest Councilwoman Kathryn McCullough. The National Council of Negro Women Inc. annually throws the gala to promote education, ethnic pride and cultural support for African American families and communities, sponsors said. Garden Grove resident Beatrice C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1998 | TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They represent only about 1% of Orange County's 2.6 million residents, but African Americans showed up in strong numbers Saturday at an annual parade celebrating black history. Despite gloomy skies, an estimated 5,000 revelers of diverse backgrounds came out for the sixth annual Black History Parade and Cultural Faire in downtown Santa Ana. Like a blessing, the El Nino rains of last week temporarily stopped.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1998 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After living in Orange County 16 years, enjoying the lifestyle but feeling a strong sense of racial isolation, Xerox executive Betty Arnold, an African American, has found a sense of community. As the new president of the Orange County chapter of the National Conference--formerly called the National Conference of Christians and Jews--Arnold has found people who share her commitment to diversity, if not her culture and color.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1998 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a day for taking stock of race relations in America, Kathryn McCullough measured progress by the length of time it takes her to count the number of black elected city officials in Orange County. It is a short list, beginning and ending with her. It has been that way since McCullough was first elected to the Lake Forest City Council in 1994. As the nation remembered slain civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1997 | TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Manuel's voice carries when he spins a tale. His message resonates even more powerfully. Manuel left his aerospace engineering job in 1993 to pursue his passion: to become a professional African storyteller and historian. On Saturday, his oratorical skills captivated the audience in the Santa Ana Valley High School auditorium where the fifth annual Kwanzaa Celebration was held. "Our principles in Kwanzaa are shared in many other practices," Manuel said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1997 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Willia Edmonds gazed at the crowd overflowing the Bowers Museum for Kwanzaa festivities last year and knew the holiday that celebrates African American culture had taken root in Orange County. And it wasn't about to let go. "As I stood on the stage and looked at the people cramming into that room and thought, 'Oh, my God, someone's going to call the Fire Department,' the realization struck me," said Edmonds, president of the museum's African Cultural Arts Council.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1997 | RUSS LOAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For David Fields, social progress has a lot to do with land. He traces his own career path--from a Los Angeles high school to Yale University and Harvard Law School, to a position as the top lawyer for a division of the Irvine Co.--back to a plot of land. It was a land-use issue of sorts that prompted Fields' parents to leave the Deep South for Los Angeles in 1959 when he was just a year old.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1997 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An African American woman whose home reportedly has been targeted by racist vandals several times since Friday told police she found a sheet with a painted face hanging from a noose outside her front door on Thursday. Karole Lee, who moved to the Country Apartments with her husband, Don, and 13-year-old daughter in March, told police that she discovered the sheet when a friend arrived about noon. It was not there in the morning, she said.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|