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Blade Runner

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2013 | By Susan King
Cinespia and the Los Angeles Historic Theater Foundation's screening Saturday of Ridley Scott's 1982 sci-fi classic "Blade Runner" at the Million Dollar Theater in downtown L.A. is currently sold out. But 200 additional tickets will go on sale Tuesday (March 1 9) at noon. There will be a limit of two tickets per person. The Million Dollar Theater, one of the first movie palaces built in the United States, opened in 1918. The venerable Broadway theater was one of the locations featured in "Blade Runner," which stars Harrison Ford.
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WORLD
August 16, 2013 | By Alexandra Zavis
Oscar Pistorius, the double amputee Olympic sprinter, may face additional charges when he is indicted Monday for the Valentine's Day killing of his girlfriend, according to news reports. National Prosecuting Authority spokesman Medupe Simasiku told the Associated Press on Friday that Pistorius would be formally charged with premeditated murder in the death of model Reeva Steenkamp, who would have turned 30 on Monday. Other charges could be added to the indictment, Simasiku said without elaborating.
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SPORTS
June 28, 2013 | By Dan Loumena
Oscar Pistorius, the Paralympic athlete from South Africa known as the Blade Runner, was back on the track Thursday in a low-key workout for the first time since he was accused of killing his girlfriend in February. Pistorius will be arraigned in August for the death of Reeva Steenkamp, a model and actress. He says he accidentally shot Steenkamp when he mistook her for an intruder at his Pretoria home in the early morning of Feb. 14. The double amputee, who was seen in March at the University of Pretoria track, made his official return to training Thursday for what his family termed a light workout.
SPORTS
June 28, 2013 | By Dan Loumena
Oscar Pistorius, the Paralympic athlete from South Africa known as the Blade Runner, was back on the track Thursday in a low-key workout for the first time since he was accused of killing his girlfriend in February. Pistorius will be arraigned in August for the death of Reeva Steenkamp, a model and actress. He says he accidentally shot Steenkamp when he mistook her for an intruder at his Pretoria home in the early morning of Feb. 14. The double amputee, who was seen in March at the University of Pretoria track, made his official return to training Thursday for what his family termed a light workout.
NEWS
November 12, 1992 | LYNN SMITH, Lynn Smith is a staff writer for The Times' View section.
In the dark and futuristic "Blade Runner," humanlike robots seek revenge on their makers for having programmed them with limited lives. Humans retaliate by trying to destroy them. Rated R. Only a couple of places in Orange County are showing the re-edited version of the 1982 movie, but a Fountain Valley father said he didn't mind driving all the way to Newport Beach to see it. He said he wanted his three kids to see something a little more complex than "The Mighty Ducks."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2008 | Geoff Boucher; Chris Lee; Mark Olsen; Rachel Abramowitz; Scott Timberg; Patrick Day; Kenneth Turan
The 25 best L.A. films of the last 25 years "Los ANGELES isn't a real city," people have said, "it just plays one on camera." It was a clever line once upon a time, but all that has changed. Los Angeles is the most complicated community in America -- make no mistake, it is a community -- and over the last 25 years, it has been both celebrated and savaged on the big screen with amazing efficacy. Damaged souls and flawless weather, canyon love and beach city menace, homeboys and credit card girls, freeways and fedoras, power lines and palm trees . . . again and again, moviegoers all over the world have sat in the dark and stared up at our Los Angeles, even if it was one populated by corrupt cops or a jabbering cartoon rabbit.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2009 | Lawrence Levi
Dissolute movie producers have told all in books like "The Kid Stays in the Picture" and "You'll Never Eat Lunch in This Town Again." But what about the less flashy producers, those staid men and women who anxiously strive to keep their budgets and directors under control? That's the story Michael Deeley means to tell in "Blade Runners, Deer Hunters, and Blowing the Bloody Doors Off: My Life in Cult Movies."
BUSINESS
May 10, 1995
Tuesday that it has obtained the rights to publish a video game based on the cyber-classic film, "Blade Runner." The CD-ROM game due out next year will allow players to battle killer androids just as Harrison Ford does in the 1982 Warner Bros. film, in which he plays a lone bounty hunter pitted against a rogue band of killer androids in a world tyrannized by high-tech corporations.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1992 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The reconstructed "Blade Runner," finally opening today at the Mann Village, may be the best "new" American movie released this year. Set in its spectacular dystopian Los Angeles, enveloped in high-tech shimmer, a gaudy mix of Wonderland and rain-drenched City of Night, director Ridley Scott's adaptation of the Philip K. Dick novel "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?" had one of the most spellbinding "looks" of any modern movie.
BOOKS
March 10, 1996 | Mark Lindquist, Seattle writer and lawyer Mark Lindquist has lived in and written about Los Angeles. He is the author of "Sad Movies" and "Carnival Desires."
Los Angeles, 2021. The atmosphere is scoured raw by the merciless Santa Ana winds. Fires flare as subterranean gases rise from the city streets and ignite. Relief comes in the occasional monsoons, which temporarily shield inhabitants from the blistering sun. At night, multilingual neon glares senselessly from both vertical and horizontal buildings. Earthquakes are less of a concern now that the taller buildings lie in crooked angles on their sides, casualties of past seismic activity.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2013 | By Susan King
Cinespia and the Los Angeles Historic Theater Foundation's screening Saturday of Ridley Scott's 1982 sci-fi classic "Blade Runner" at the Million Dollar Theater in downtown L.A. is currently sold out. But 200 additional tickets will go on sale Tuesday (March 1 9) at noon. There will be a limit of two tickets per person. The Million Dollar Theater, one of the first movie palaces built in the United States, opened in 1918. The venerable Broadway theater was one of the locations featured in "Blade Runner," which stars Harrison Ford.
WORLD
February 15, 2013 | Robyn Dixon
He was a national treasure who inspired the world when he made Olympics history as the first double amputee runner to compete using prosthetic blades. She was a blond-haired, blue-eyed cover girl and celebrity model, with a law degree and an interest in women's rights. But in a Valentine's Day tragedy involving South Africa's "Blade Runner," Oscar Pistorius, the body of a woman was found in a pool of blood early Thursday at his home in an upscale suburb of Pretoria. Pistorius was charged with murder in the death of his girlfriend, Reeva Steenkamp.
SPORTS
August 4, 2012 | Bill Plaschke
LONDON -- Oscar Pistorius marches into Olympic Stadium with a limping gait of an old man, and the only thing you see, the only place you look, the only thing that matters, are his legs. They are blades. Goodness, they really are blades. Their charcoal tint glistens beneath a sudden London sun. They seem to squeak around a damp midmorning track. He flew the legs here from South Africa in a carry-on bag. He will be delayed after his race because he is removing the legs. PHOTOS: 2012 London Olympics, Day 8 When he drops into the metal starting blocks Saturday morning, becoming the first double-amputee to compete in an Olympics, his legs make it appear he's actually part of the starting blocks.
SPORTS
July 5, 2012 | Bill Plaschke
Every Olympics has at least one story that leaves a giant, enduring footprint. Just guessing, but this summer it will be about the sprinter with no feet. Earlier this week the news slipped under a radar blinking madly with NBA trade talk, but the announcement from South Africa will soon blind the world with its shocking, silvery glint. Competing in London next month in the 400-meter dash and 1,600-meter relay will be a double amputee with no lower legs, a guy who races on carbon-fiber prosthetic blades, an imperfect athlete with the most perfect of nicknames.
SPORTS
June 13, 2011 | Bill Dwyre
To best understand the athletic pursuits of Oscar Pistorius, it would be ideal to walk a mile in his shoes. Except, we can't. When Pistorius competes, he runs on artificial limbs known as Cheetah Flex-Foot prosthetics. They are shaped like the letter J, are made by a company (Ossur) with headquarters in Iceland and connect to the leg just below the knee. Their appearance, and Pistorius' speed, have brought him the nickname "The Blade Runner. " If you were an editor or network TV producer compiling a list of the likely best stories to come out of the 2012 Olympics in London, Pistorius' would be near the top. He is trying to make the Games, as a member of the South African Olympic team, in the 400 meters.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2010 | By Robert Abele
Plenty of interior body parts are forcibly removed from reluctant humans in the violent, futuristic action film "Repo Men." Kidneys, hearts, livers, all high-tech and artificial, are taken out and, in the movie's cautionary premise, rented to the medically needy at usury-friendly rates by a nasty corporation called the Union. But there's a key organ missing from the movie itself: a brain. In its place is a memory bank of other, better movies. That's a shame because creeping around the edges of "Repo Men" is the potential for a funky and prescient piece of gory dystopian satire.
OPINION
January 30, 2008 | TIM RUTTEN
Life imitates art in ways too strange to imagine. Take, for example, two recent proposals for downtown redevelopment. Developer Sonny Astani wants to hang a 14-story animated billboard on the side of the condominium tower he's building at 9th and Figueroa, up the street from the Staples Center and the new Nokia Theatre, which already is shrouded in video billboards. Astani needs city permission to light up his building and one he plans to build next door. One only can hope that somebody says no.
MAGAZINE
September 13, 1992 | KENNETH TURAN, Kenneth Turan is The Times' film critic and former book-review editor
ELEGANT CARS GLIDING THROUGH A DECAYING infrastructure, the dispossessed huddling in the shadow of bright skyscrapers, the sensation of a dystopian, multiethnic civilization that has managed to simultaneously advance and regress--these are scenes of modern urban decline, and if they make you think of a movie, and chances are they will, it can have only one name: "Blade Runner." Few, if any, motion pictures have the gift of predicting the future as well as crystallizing an indelible image of it, but that is the key to "Blade Runner's" accomplishments.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2009 | Lawrence Levi
Dissolute movie producers have told all in books like "The Kid Stays in the Picture" and "You'll Never Eat Lunch in This Town Again." But what about the less flashy producers, those staid men and women who anxiously strive to keep their budgets and directors under control? That's the story Michael Deeley means to tell in "Blade Runners, Deer Hunters, and Blowing the Bloody Doors Off: My Life in Cult Movies."
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