Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBlenda Wilson
IN THE NEWS

Blenda Wilson

NEWS
March 3, 1999 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blenda J. Wilson, who as president of Cal State Northridge lifted the devastated institution back to its feet after the 1994 Northridge earthquake, announced Tuesday she would leave her post in June to head a Massachusetts educational foundation. Wilson, the third president of the 40-year-old university, will serve as the first president of the Nellie Mae Foundation. The university said Wilson would remain on campus at least through spring commencement.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1993
My wife and I graduated from Cal State Northridge in 1967. We did not go through the graduation ceremony. It was not a thing for politically active students on the left to do then. We were concerned about the spreading War in Vietnam, opposed to silly rituals and determined to make America a true democracy responsive to the needs of minorities and ordinary people everywhere. People do change over time. Twenty-six years later, I found myself sitting through a graduation ceremony at Cal State Northridge for my two oldest daughters, Regina and Stephanie.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1999 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blenda J. Wilson, who as president of Cal State Northridge guided the devastated institution back to its feet after the 1994 Northridge earthquake, announced Tuesday that she will leave her post in June to head a Massachusetts educational foundation. Wilson, the third president of the 40-year-old campus, will serve as the first president of the Nellie Mae Foundation. The university said Wilson will remain on campus at least through spring commencement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1999 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jolene Koester, an educator known for forging strong relationships between faculty and administrators, was named president Tuesday of Cal State Northridge. The 51-year-old provost and vice president of academic affairs at Cal State Sacramento brings a background in diversity issues and a knowledge of the California State University system to the job as head of the 27,000-student campus, the San Fernando Valley's only four-year university.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1999 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cal State Northridge has scheduled a full slate of commencement speakers for its June graduation ceremonies, drawing from the fields of business, humanitarianism, entertainment, politics and mathematics. About 6,900 students will receive CSUN degrees next month. Outgoing President Blenda J. Wilson will deliver the final commencement address. "As this is my last commencement as president of California State University, Northridge, it is very special to me," Wilson said in a prepared statement.
SPORTS
January 1, 1999 | STEVE HENSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blenda J. Wilson, reluctant sports authority, must make decisions in 1999 that will chart the course of Cal State Northridge athletics well into the next century. The Northridge president will hire an athletic director and will decide whether to commit major resources to constructing stadiums for the football, baseball and softball teams.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1996 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
(BEGIN TEXT OF INFOBOX / INFOGRAPHIC) Slow Recovery Buildings at CSUN that still need repair: In millions * Administration: $11.1 Computer Center: $5.2 Fine Arts: $5.0 Sierra Tower: $4.4 Oviatt Library (wings): $4.3 * Funding the Recovery In millions * Total recovery funds received thus far: $162.7 Pending review by Federal Emergency Management Agency: $124.1 Estimated projects CSUN must still submit: $14.4 Total estimated recovery funding: $301.2 Source: California State University system
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1995 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a statement marked by personal reflections on her own encounters with discrimination, Cal State Northridge President Blenda Wilson on Tuesday issued a strong defense of affirmative action policies, but declined to take a stand on a controversial proposed state initiative. Wilson said her own life experiences--including being denied a job as a young woman because she was black and being counseled in school to become a secretary--have convinced her of the need for affirmative action.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|