Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBlindness
IN THE NEWS

Blindness

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 4, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
More than a century after she went blind, a new study casts doubt on how bright, blue-eyed “Little House on the Prairie” older sister Mary Ingalls lost her vision. Using medical papers from the 19 th century, unpublished family journals and old newspaper clippings, medical historians claim it was viral meningoencephalitis that destroyed Ingalls' vision in 1879, not the scarlet fever that  wreaked havoc on families across the American frontier. They make their case for the new diagnosis in a study published in Monday's edition of the journal Pediatrics.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
April 14, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
OVERLAND PARK, Kan. - Standing at the lectern, Mindy Corporon calmly spoke about love in the face of hatred, describing how two people so central to her life - her father and her son - were shot to death by a gunman who police say is a white supremacist bent on violence. Her voice steady, she described arriving Sunday afternoon moments after the attacker, whom police identified as Frazier Glenn Cross, opened fire in the parking lot of the Jewish Community Center here, a shooting rampage that took the lives of three people, including a woman outside a nearby Jewish senior center.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2008
The inspiration for the washed-out look in "Blindness" came directly from the source material -- Jose Saramago's novel -- which described the onset of sudden blindness as an excess of light, looking like a sea of milk. Cinematographer Cesar Charlone figured out what that might look like by filling a photo developing tray with milk, white paint and water. Then he took images displayed on his laptop and reflected them onto the mixture. There was his look, but re-creating that on set took some coordination.
SCIENCE
April 7, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
What makes old violins crafted by members of the Stradivari family so much better than violins produced today? Nothing, according to a new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. In a musical version of the classic Coke versus Pepsi taste tests, scientists teamed up with experts who make, play and sell violins to see whether there's any substance to the widespread belief that old violins are superior to newer models. Just as with soda, the researchers discovered that highly accomplished violin soloists couldn't tell the difference between old and new instruments.
NEWS
December 17, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, For the Los Angeles Times
John Wilkinson lost the sight in his left eye when he was a kid. Over the summer, vision in his good eye began to wane. An Orlando Sentinel story explains: "Every day, it gradually got worse," said Wilkinson, who lives in Casselberry, Fla. "And then I woke up one day and I couldn't see my hand in front of my face. " Wilkinson went blind for the same reason many others do, especially older people. "Cataracts are the number one cause of reversible blindness in the world," Dr. David Auerbach of Maitland, Fla., says in the story.
BUSINESS
November 17, 2003 | From Reuters
An experimental drug that blocks abnormal blood vessel growth in the eye is an effective treatment for the leading cause of age-related blindness, according to new research. Macugen -- a drug being developed by Pfizer Inc. and Eyetech Pharmaceuticals Inc., both based in New York -- was 27% more effective than a placebo at limiting vision loss in patients with the "wet" form of macular degeneration in a late-stage trial, said Dr.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1988 | JESUS SANCHEZ
About 600,000 Americans are legally blind, according to the American Foundation for the Blind. Individuals are classified as legally blind, which entitles them to certain tax preferences and other benefits, when they can see objects no more than 20 feet away. Normally sighted persons can see at 200 feet. Only 10% of the legally blind are totally blind; most have some vision. Another 2.5 million Americans are visually impaired, which means they are unable to read ordinary-size print.
BUSINESS
July 1, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Cardtronics Inc., the nation's largest nonbank owner of automated teller machines, will make most of its ATMs accessible to the blind by 2010 under an agreement settling a lawsuit filed by the National Federation of the Blind and Massachusetts Atty. Gen. Martha Coakley. Houston-based Cardtronics operates about 24,000 ATMs in locations including Albertsons supermarkets, CVS Caremark Corp. pharmacies and Target Corp. stores.
SCIENCE
November 12, 2003 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Pharmaceutical giant Pfizer Inc. said Tuesday that it will donate nearly half a billion dollars' worth of the antibiotic Zithromax to treat 135 million people for trachoma, an infectious disease that has blinded 6 million people worldwide. The gift will make the drug available over the next five years, providing a major impetus toward the World Health Organization's goal of eliminating the disease by 2020.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1997 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
When Arnie and Lilly Rubin of Encino learned their second child, daughter Laurie, was blind, they set out to stimulate her other senses with textures, scents and classical music. They didn't know then that their efforts would inspire her. Rubin, now 18 and an accomplished singer, was one of two in the nation to be named a 1997 Very Special Arts Panasonic Young Soloist, a title given each year to talented young musicians with disabilities.
OPINION
April 5, 2014
Re "The quest for diversity," Editorial, March 28 Your editorial on Proposition 209 and diversity at California's public universities is unclear and patronizing. It is unclear in endorsing as the benchmark of "meaningful racial diversity" the University of California's "diversity goals" - goals that the university has not itself enunciated. One can try and divine what the university's goals are, but with little success. Apparently, exceeding the pre-Proposition 209 minority enrollment (except for African American students at Berkeley and UCLA)
BUSINESS
March 30, 2014 | By Chris O'Brien
The gig: Ramona Pierson, 51, is chief executive of Declara, a start-up based in Palo Alto that has developed a way for companies to use sophisticated techniques and advanced Internet search to create workplace tools. In two years, it has grown to 57 employees, and the company has attracted $5 million in funding from such notable investors as Peter Thiel. The journey: As impressive as the company's start has been, it's Pierson's back story that is particularly special.
NATIONAL
March 21, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
A woman who lost her hands, eyesight and parts of her face when she was mauled by a friend's chimpanzee renewed a bid to seek $150 million in damages from the state of Connecticut, asking lawmakers Friday to accept her argument that the state had a duty to seize the allegedly dangerous animal. The state had long known of and even investigated Travis the television-acting chimpanzee in North Stamford, Conn., officials said. But the state's Department of Energy and Environmental Protection never sought to remove Travis from Sandra Herold's home before he attacked Charla Nash in 2009.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2014 | By Amy Reiter
The coaches took their teams from almost full to completely full on "The Voice" on Tuesday. "I truly believe that we all have winners on our team," Adam Levine said magnanimously as the final night of blinds kicked off. Later, though, he was less generous. "Team Adam is the best team," he said. "Duh. " Levine and fellow coaches Blake Shelton, Usher and Shakira all added solid talent to their rosters Tuesday. PHOTOS: Concerts by The Times Shelton filled the final spot on his team with Kaleigh Glanton, a 20-year-old classical guitarist, singer and CrossFit enthusiast from Wichita, Kan., who turned all four chairs with her take on "Have You Seen the Rain?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2014 | By Laura J. Nelson
A passenger who was on the Metro Red Line train that passed over a blind man moments after he fell off a platform Thursday described having a "sick feeling" as riders realized what had happened. The man --  an unidentified 47-year-old Los Angeles resident who survived the incident mostly unharmed -- had been using a cane to feel his way toward the edge of Metro's Wilshire/Vermont subway platform when he went too far and tumbled over. When the eastbound Red Line train slowed to a stop, the man was trapped underneath, said  Paul Gonzales, a spokesman for the  Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2014 | By Laura J. Nelson
This post has been updated A blind man who fell off the edge of a subway platform Thursday afternoon and into the path of an oncoming Metro train survived the accident mostly unharmed, officials said. "It really is a miracle," Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority spokeman Paul Gonzales told The Times. "It's something you only see on TV. " The man, an unidentified 47-year-old Los Angeles resident, had been using a cane to feel his way toward the edge of Metro's Wilshire/Vermont subway platform, Gonzales said.  The operator of the incoming Red Line train saw the man and honked to warn him that he was about to reach the edge of the platform, but it was too late: The man fell and tumbled into the track bed as the train approached.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1993 | JEFF SCHNAUFER
Geraldo Cruz has always gained pleasure from the sounds of life, but now the looming closure of the Visually Handicapped Adults of the Valley Center in Van Nuys threatens to take away the sweetest sound of all: a perfect strike. Blind since birth, Cruz and about 160 other Valley residents get their only recreational activity--such as the weekly bowling club--from the center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1997 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
An Encino vocalist was the Valley's sole finalist in the Music Center's ninth annual Spotlight Awards. Laurie Rubin, 18, will be among the 12 high school students throughout Southern California to compete in six categories at the award's finals on April 8 at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. Rubin is a classically trained vocalist who has just begun competing after years spent singing for charity dinners honoring the likes of Ronald and Nancy Reagan, Gen.
SCIENCE
February 5, 2014 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Want to hear as well as Stevie Wonder or the late Ray Charles? A blindfold not only might help, it could re-wire your brain in the process, a new study suggests. The study , in mice, was the first to show evidence on a cellular level of a phenomenon that has been relatively well chronicled behaviorally - damage to one sense can be compensated with strength in another. And that compensation can happen later in life, when the brain is generally less susceptible to rewiring, the study found.
OPINION
January 26, 2014 | By Bruce Ackerman
President Obama's recent speech on government surveillance is dominating the conversation, but he won't be making the key decisions on the future of the National Security Agency's collection of domestic phone data. The statutory provision authorizing these massive sweeps expires June 1, 2015. If Congress simply does nothing, the NSA's domestic spying program will soon come to a screeching halt. The question is whether Americans will seize this opportunity to gain critical perspective on the crisis responses of the George W. Bush years.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|