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BUSINESS
March 1, 2012 | By Alex Pham, Los Angeles Times
Blizzard Entertainment, a subsidiary of Activision Blizzard Inc., is eliminating 600 jobs, the Irvine game studio disclosed Wednesday. The jobs represent 8.2% of the workforce at Activision. The Santa Monica company reported having 7,300 workers at the end of 2011. Blizzard, which publishes the popular World of Warcraft title, said in a brief statement that 90% of the affected jobs are not related to game development. As a result, the company said, its game release schedule for Diablo III, World of Warcraft: Mists of Pandaria, Blizzard DOTA and StarCraft II: Heart of the Swarm remain intact.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2012 | By Ben Fritz
Online game "World of Warcraft" has turned around its two-year decline in subscribers thanks to a popular new expansion pack. "Mists of Pandaria," a new retail game that adds a large new chunk of content for "Warcraft" players, sold 2.7 million copies during its first week on sale. More important for game-maker Activision, excitement around "Pandaria" has brought back at least 900,000 players, who pay a monthly fee for the game. The Santa Monica company said it now has more than 10 million subscribers worldwide.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2012 | By Jamie Wetherbe
The Pacific Symphony performs music for an unlikely audience -- gamers battling the hellish underworlds of Diablo III. The symphony teamed up with Irvine-based game developer Blizzard Entertainment, known for the Warcraft and Starcraft franchises, for the long-awaited third installment in the Diablo series. More than 100 musicians recorded the score live last July in Costa Mesa's Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall under the baton of Eímear Noone. “It was important to give Diablo III its own sound - - not only via the compositions, but even in the manner in which it was recorded,” Blizzard Entertainment's audio director Russell Brower said in a news release about the project.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2012 | By Alex Pham
Despite turning in a second quarter that outshone Wall Street's expectations, investors pushed shares of Activision Blizzard down more than 5% after the company said its "World of Warcraft" online game lost more than a million subscribers in the second quarter. The world's largest video game company said Thursday that the number of "World of Warcraft" players fell to 9.1 million in the quarter ended June 30, down from 10.2 million at the end of the first quarter . The game commanded 12 million players at its peak in October 2010.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2010 | By David Sarno
The gig: Chief executive and co-founder of Blizzard Entertainment Inc., maker of mega video game franchises including World of Warcraft, one of the most popular online video games in history with more than 11 million monthly subscribers. Morhaime and two fellow UCLA students started Blizzard in Irvine in 1991. The company just released an intergalactic war game called StarCraft II, which took five years to complete. Morhaime, 42, captains the long voyages from the games' inception to their release.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2012 | By Alex Pham
Gamers worldwide hacked and slashed their way through 3.5 million copies of Diablo III, a much anticipated fantasy role playing game from Blizzard Entertainment, within 24 hours of the title hitting store shelves May 15. Blizzard, based in Irvine, announced the title in 2008, but the game was widely known to be in development for years prior, making it one of the longest games to be in development before its release. The success came with unexpected downside. With millions of players storming Blizzard's computer servers to play Diablo III online, many consumers reported difficulty in logging in to the game and problems with the game's online performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2012 | By Ben Fritz
Online game "World of Warcraft" has turned around its two-year decline in subscribers thanks to a popular new expansion pack. "Mists of Pandaria," a new retail game that adds a large new chunk of content for "Warcraft" players, sold 2.7 million copies during its first week on sale. More important for game-maker Activision, excitement around "Pandaria" has brought back at least 900,000 players, who pay a monthly fee for the game. The Santa Monica company said it now has more than 10 million subscribers worldwide.
BUSINESS
November 30, 1998 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to create revenue opportunities, Irvine-based software developer Blizzard Entertainment unveiled a line of toy action figures over the weekend that ties into its most popular titles, the shoot-'em-up action games WarCraft and StarCraft. There's only one small problem. Traditionally, the majority of people who buy these tiny toys are boys, ages 8 to 12. The folks who flock to Blizzard's games are also boys, but in their late teens and 20s.
BUSINESS
November 9, 2011 | By Alex Pham, Los Angeles Times
Activision Blizzard Inc. has raised its financial projections for the year, based largely on the strength of a single game: Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3. But a sharp drop in subscribers for the game publisher's other marquee title, World of Warcraft, knocked the wind out of the company's stock. The Santa Monica company announced Tuesday that subscribers for its World of Warcraft online game had fallen to 10.3 million from 11.4 million at the end of March. "The magnitude of the decline was surprising," said Michael Pachter, an analyst with Wedbush Securities.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2010 | By Alex Pham
Activision Blizzard Inc. said Wednesday that its fourth-quarter loss widened to $286 million, despite strong revenue from its blockbuster Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 title along with sales of games that also have an online presence. The Santa Monica video game publisher lost 23 cents a share for the quarter, compared with a loss of $72 million, or 5 cents a share, for the previous year's final three months. Revenue fell slightly to $1.56 billion from $1.64 billion, even though sales of its Guitar Hero titles fell 35%. The results included deferred revenue of $938 million from the sale of games that included an online component.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2012 | By Alex Pham
Gamers worldwide hacked and slashed their way through 3.5 million copies of Diablo III, a much anticipated fantasy role playing game from Blizzard Entertainment, within 24 hours of the title hitting store shelves May 15. Blizzard, based in Irvine, announced the title in 2008, but the game was widely known to be in development for years prior, making it one of the longest games to be in development before its release. The success came with unexpected downside. With millions of players storming Blizzard's computer servers to play Diablo III online, many consumers reported difficulty in logging in to the game and problems with the game's online performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2012 | By Jamie Wetherbe
The Pacific Symphony performs music for an unlikely audience -- gamers battling the hellish underworlds of Diablo III. The symphony teamed up with Irvine-based game developer Blizzard Entertainment, known for the Warcraft and Starcraft franchises, for the long-awaited third installment in the Diablo series. More than 100 musicians recorded the score live last July in Costa Mesa's Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall under the baton of Eímear Noone. “It was important to give Diablo III its own sound - - not only via the compositions, but even in the manner in which it was recorded,” Blizzard Entertainment's audio director Russell Brower said in a news release about the project.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2012 | By Alex Pham, Los Angeles Times
Blizzard Entertainment, a subsidiary of Activision Blizzard Inc., is eliminating 600 jobs, the Irvine game studio disclosed Wednesday. The jobs represent 8.2% of the workforce at Activision. The Santa Monica company reported having 7,300 workers at the end of 2011. Blizzard, which publishes the popular World of Warcraft title, said in a brief statement that 90% of the affected jobs are not related to game development. As a result, the company said, its game release schedule for Diablo III, World of Warcraft: Mists of Pandaria, Blizzard DOTA and StarCraft II: Heart of the Swarm remain intact.
BUSINESS
November 9, 2011 | By Alex Pham, Los Angeles Times
Activision Blizzard Inc. has raised its financial projections for the year, based largely on the strength of a single game: Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3. But a sharp drop in subscribers for the game publisher's other marquee title, World of Warcraft, knocked the wind out of the company's stock. The Santa Monica company announced Tuesday that subscribers for its World of Warcraft online game had fallen to 10.3 million from 11.4 million at the end of March. "The magnitude of the decline was surprising," said Michael Pachter, an analyst with Wedbush Securities.
BUSINESS
August 4, 2011 | By Alex Pham, Los Angeles Times
Despite owning a broad portfolio of game franchises, Activision Blizzard Inc. continues to rely on a handful of titles from Blizzard Entertainment in Irvine and the Call of Duty franchise for much of its sales and profits. The Santa Monica game publisher said its second-quarter revenue of $1.15 billion was up 19% from $967 million a year earlier, thanks to strong sales of supplemental online content for its Call of Duty: Black Ops, as well as the popularity of two Blizzard titles, World of Warcraft: Cataclysm and Star Craft II: Wings of Liberty.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2010 | By David Sarno
The gig: Chief executive and co-founder of Blizzard Entertainment Inc., maker of mega video game franchises including World of Warcraft, one of the most popular online video games in history with more than 11 million monthly subscribers. Morhaime and two fellow UCLA students started Blizzard in Irvine in 1991. The company just released an intergalactic war game called StarCraft II, which took five years to complete. Morhaime, 42, captains the long voyages from the games' inception to their release.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2009 | Ben Fritz
Getting divorced was a lonely experience for Josh Schweitzer. Spending his days overseeing construction workers and his evenings caring for his 3-year-old son, he had no one to talk to. But there was one group of people who helped him pull through -- even though he'd never laid eyes on most of them. They were his World of Warcraft friends -- "guild people," he calls them. They live all over the world and spend 20, 30 or more hours a week together in the online world of Azeroth as druids, priests, warriors and rogues, slaying monsters and collecting treasure.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2012 | By Alex Pham
Despite turning in a second quarter that outshone Wall Street's expectations, investors pushed shares of Activision Blizzard down more than 5% after the company said its "World of Warcraft" online game lost more than a million subscribers in the second quarter. The world's largest video game company said Thursday that the number of "World of Warcraft" players fell to 9.1 million in the quarter ended June 30, down from 10.2 million at the end of the first quarter . The game commanded 12 million players at its peak in October 2010.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2010 | By Alex Pham
Activision Blizzard Inc. said Wednesday that its fourth-quarter loss widened to $286 million, despite strong revenue from its blockbuster Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 title along with sales of games that also have an online presence. The Santa Monica video game publisher lost 23 cents a share for the quarter, compared with a loss of $72 million, or 5 cents a share, for the previous year's final three months. Revenue fell slightly to $1.56 billion from $1.64 billion, even though sales of its Guitar Hero titles fell 35%. The results included deferred revenue of $938 million from the sale of games that included an online component.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2009 | Ben Fritz
Getting divorced was a lonely experience for Josh Schweitzer. Spending his days overseeing construction workers and his evenings caring for his 3-year-old son, he had no one to talk to. But there was one group of people who helped him pull through -- even though he'd never laid eyes on most of them. They were his World of Warcraft friends -- "guild people," he calls them. They live all over the world and spend 20, 30 or more hours a week together in the online world of Azeroth as druids, priests, warriors and rogues, slaying monsters and collecting treasure.
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