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NEWS
May 24, 1989 | LOUIS SAHAGUN and MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writers
Afton Canyon, a four-mile ribbon of green wetlands wedged between majestically weathered rock walls in the middle of California's Mojave Desert, has attracted many people for many reasons over the last century. It has a reputation as a cattle trail, campground, firearms range, off-road motorcycle course and bird-watcher's paradise. Wildlife, such as bighorn sheep, also come to the canyon for its life-giving, year-round Mojave River flow. But in trying to accommodate each of those often conflicting reputations at the same time, Afton Canyon has earned a new reputation as a clear example of the problems preventing the Bureau of Land Management from properly managing the Mojave.
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NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By Sara Lessley
“Patriots” or “domestic terrorists”? “Citizen soldiers” or “disenfranchised militiamen”? “Honest businessman” or “freeloader?” It seems many are firmly on one side or the other when it comes to the standoff between 67-year-old cattleman Cliven Bundy (and his armed sympathizers) and the Bureau of Land Management over his cattle grazing on public land in Nevada. As Times staff writers John M. Glionna and Richard Simon wrote this week : “Bundy has his critics, but to supporters, his case is a symbol of everything wrong with America.
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NATIONAL
February 28, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
LAS VEGAS - A grass-roots community group in northern Nevada watched helplessly Wednesday as federal officials removed most of what remained of a band of wild mustangs with which residents say they have peacefully coexisted for years. About two dozen residents of a subdivision called Deer Run outside Carson City say they have tried unsuccessfully to negotiate the fate of 11 mustangs with the Bureau of Land Management, which governs public lands in Nevada and elsewhere and has purview over the wild horses.
NATIONAL
April 25, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
Are you heading to Bunkerville/To stand up and fight? Are you heading to Bunkerville/For your freedom and rights? Are you heading to Bunkerville/To stand up with me? -- From the song “Are You Heading to Bunkerville?” by Wayne and Paula Carson BUNKERVILLE, Nev. -- Susan DeLemus watched as her man headed to Bunkerville. The Rochester, N.H., resident was trolling the computer earlier this month with her husband, Jerry, when she saw him stiffen with surprise and rage at what he saw on his own computer screen.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
LAS VEGAS - Wielding signs and slogans, several hundred demonstrators rallied Monday to support beleaguered cattle rancher Cliven Bundy and his family in a turf battle against the federal government. They had responded to an alert promising a new skirmish: “Range War begins at the Bundy ranch at 9:30 a.m. We're going to get the job done!” Bundy is battling with federal officials over his cattle's grazing on 150 square miles of scrub desert overseen by the Bureau of Land Management.
NATIONAL
April 12, 2014 | By Paresh Dave, This post has been updated. See below for details.
After spending a week whisking away nearly 400 cattle they said were illegally grazing on federal land in the Nevada desert, officials facing a battalion of protesters with horses and guns decided to free those cattle in a stunning reversal Saturday afternoon. A line of cattle calmly filtered out of a federal holding area at about 3 p.m. as protesters and law enforcement watched from alongside Interstate 15 near the Nevada-Arizona state line. "Due to escalating tensions, the cattle have been released from the enclosures in order to avoid violence and help restore order," the U.S. Bureau of Land Management said in a short statement.
NATIONAL
March 6, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
LAS VEGAS  - A national animal advocacy group excoriated the federal government, saying it misled the public about last week's removal of 11 wild mustangs that had coexisted for years with residents of a populated area outside Carson City, Nev. The Humane Society of the United States has called for the Bureau of Land Management to return the animals to the wild, rather than following through on plans to put them up for adoption. “The Humane Society of the United States denounces the Bureau of Land Management's decision to remove a small band of wild horses located just east of Carson City, Nev., in the Pine Nut Herd Management Area,” according to a statement released by the group Tuesday.
NATIONAL
September 4, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
LAS VEGAS  - A major government critic of the Bureau of Land Management's treatment of wild horses in the West was in Nevada on Wednesday to inspect an agency corral housing 1,500 mustangs recently rounded up from federal range land. Arizona Rep. Raul M. Grijalva, the top Democrat on a congressional panel on public lands, is taking a tour with several animal advocates for a up-close view of a program that has divided activists and federal officials in 10 states across the West. “The congressman has been tracking the wild horse and burro issue for pretty much the entire time he's been on committee, over the last 10 years,” Brandon Bragato, a senior legislative assistant for the congressman, told the Los Angeles Times.
NATIONAL
July 23, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
The overheated debate between the federal government and animal advocates over the removal of wild mustangs from the Western range ticked a few degrees higher after the Bureau of Land Management announced plans to take fewer horses from the land this summer. Even though its holding capacity for captured wild horses has nearly reached its limit at 50,000 animals nationwide, the agency said last week that it would remove 1,300 horses in the coming months, many of which might otherwise die from lack of food and water.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
LAS VEGAS - Wielding signs and slogans, several hundred demonstrators rallied Monday to support beleaguered Nevada cattle rancher Cliven Bundy after authorities began to seize his cattle from federal land. Protesters had responded to an alert that promised: "Range war begins at the Bundy ranch at 9:30 a.m. We're going to get the job done!" Federal officials say Bundy is illegally running cattle in the 600,000-acre Gold Butte area, habitat of the federally protected desert tortoise.
NATIONAL
April 24, 2014 | By David Horsey
The right-wing insurrection at the Bundy ranch in Bunkerville, Nev., has taken another weird turn with new revelations about the family history of Cliven Bundy. Bundy justifies his two-decade-long refusal to pay the Bureau of Land Management for grazing rights on the public land where he runs his cattle by claiming his ancestors gained livestock water rights in the 1870s, long before the federal government horned in on the deal. Now, it turns out, that is not exactly true.  KLAS, the CBS affiliate in Las Vegas, checked out the Bundy family's history with the land and found Bundy's grandmother was born in 1901 to parents who had moved a few years earlier from Utah and farmed, not in Bunkerville, but in neighboring Mesquite County.
NATIONAL
April 22, 2014 | By David Horsey
Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy is a scofflaw with screwy ideas about the Constitution, and the armed oddballs who have joined his skirmish with the Bureau of Land Management are a nutty vanguard of the deluded conspiracy-mongers who dominate the far right wing in American politics. Given their actions, they do not deserve to be called patriots, but neither are they terrorists.  They have been characterized as both. Appearing together on a TV news show, Nevada's two U.S. senators disagreed about the nature of the armed men who scared off federal agents as they attempted to confiscate Bundy's cattle.
NATIONAL
April 21, 2014 | By John M. Glionna, This post has been corrected. See below for details.
The battle lines are hardening in Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy's so-called range war against the federal government over his right to graze cattle on public lands. Arguments have moved from the Nevada desert to the nation's capital, where Nevada's two U.S. senators, Republican Dean Heller and Democrat Harry Reid, recently faced off on a television public affairs show in Las Vegas. Heller described Bundy's cadre of armed supporters as “patriots” during the show, "What's the Point," on KSNV-TV News 3. Reid repeated his claim that the so-called militia men are “domestic terrorists.” Officials from the Bureau of Land Management say Bundy is illegally running hundreds of head of cattle in the 600,000-acre Gold Butte area, habitat of the federally protected desert tortoise.
NATIONAL
April 12, 2014 | By Paresh Dave and John M. Glionna
Fearing for their safety as armed protesters gathered in the Nevada back country, federal officials on Saturday suddenly ended a controversial effort to seize hundreds of cattle that a rancher has kept illegally on public land. The cattle ranch's owner, Cliven Bundy, and hundreds of armed supporters had threatened to forcefully keep Bureau of Land Management employees from rounding up the approximately 900 cattle. Nearly 400 of the cattle had been seized during the past week. They were being held nearby and could be sent to Utah, authorities said.
NATIONAL
April 12, 2014 | By Paresh Dave, This post has been updated. See below for details.
After spending a week whisking away nearly 400 cattle they said were illegally grazing on federal land in the Nevada desert, officials facing a battalion of protesters with horses and guns decided to free those cattle in a stunning reversal Saturday afternoon. A line of cattle calmly filtered out of a federal holding area at about 3 p.m. as protesters and law enforcement watched from alongside Interstate 15 near the Nevada-Arizona state line. "Due to escalating tensions, the cattle have been released from the enclosures in order to avoid violence and help restore order," the U.S. Bureau of Land Management said in a short statement.
NATIONAL
April 9, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
LAS VEGAS - Nevada's governor and one of its U.S. senators have joined a chorus of criticism of a month-long federal government roundup of a recalcitrant rancher's 900 cattle that for decades have grazed on hundreds of thousands of acres of public lands near here. Gov. Brian Sandoval said in a statement that his office has received numerous complaints about the operation by the Bureau of Land Management and National Park Service to collect cattle belonging to southern Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy, who for decades has refused to pay the required fees to graze his animals on public land.
NEWS
May 21, 1989 | MARK A. STEIN and LOUIS SAHAGUN, Times Staff Writers
Other people saw only a scarred and trash-strewn hillside. Miner Frank Melluzzo recognized opportunity. Under an antiquated century-old federal mining law, he staked a claim on 60 acres of federally owned land overlooking Phoenix and eventually was allowed to buy it from the U.S. Bureau of Land Management for $2.50 an acre. He was looking for building stone. Instead, he struck real estate gold. In 1980, six years after acquiring the land, Melluzzo sold an interest in it to the developer of a planned condominium-golf course project called the Pointe Tapatio Cliffs.
NATIONAL
June 26, 2007 | Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writer
A Wyoming rancher cannot use the federal racketeering law to seek damages against employees of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management whom he accused of harassment, the Supreme Court ruled Monday . The unanimous decision reversed a federal appeals court ruling. The earlier ruling had government officials fearing that if the high court permitted the case to proceed, it would spawn a bevy of litigation against federal employees merely trying to do their jobs.
NATIONAL
April 8, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
LAS VEGAS - Federal authorities were on the defensive Tuesday during the fourth day of their planned monthlong offensive to remove an outspoken rancher's cattle from lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management. As dozens of protesters chanted slogans in designated “First Amendment areas,” armed federal officials oversaw the roundup of hundreds of cattle belonging to Nevada cattle rancher Cliven Bundy, who for decades has thumbed his nose at Washington, refusing to pay grazing fees to run 900 cattle on federal land.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
LAS VEGAS - Wielding signs and slogans, several hundred demonstrators rallied Monday to support beleaguered cattle rancher Cliven Bundy and his family in a turf battle against the federal government. They had responded to an alert promising a new skirmish: “Range War begins at the Bundy ranch at 9:30 a.m. We're going to get the job done!” Bundy is battling with federal officials over his cattle's grazing on 150 square miles of scrub desert overseen by the Bureau of Land Management.
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