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NATIONAL
March 3, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
LAS VEGAS -- Federal officials say they have finished rounding up 11 “problem” wild mustangs in northern Nevada and that the horses will now be offered for adoption. The last of a band that once numbered 50 mustangs were enticed into a trap last week, as concerned residents of the Carson City neighborhood watched in dismay, questioning why the Bureau of Land Management insisted on removing animals that had peacefully coexisted with surrounding homeowners for years. In a news release Friday, the day the last horse was lured into a trap with offerings of alfalfa and barley, the BLM repeated past claims that people had complained about the animals crossing busy roadways and damaging property to graze in a small public park.
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NEWS
June 12, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee, This post has been corrected. See the note at the bottom for details.
WASHINGTON -- The Interior Department is losing tens of millions of dollars in revenue annually because it leases public land for coal mining at rock-bottom prices, according to a report by the agency's inspector general The report focuses on coal leases for federal and tribal lands sold by the Bureau of Land Management to mining companies. Most coal on public lands is in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana, a region that produces about 40% of the coal that the United States burns in its power plants.
NATIONAL
July 1, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
ANTELOPE VALLEY, Nev. - Just after dawn, a dozen mustangs stampede across the high desert, harassed by a white helicopter that dips and swoops like a relentless insect. Frightened stallions lead a tightknit family band, including two wild-eyed foals that struggle to keep up. Three animal activists watch through long-range camera lenses as wranglers hired by the federal Bureau of Land Management help drive the animals into a camouflaged corral. The private-contract pilot is paid $500 for each captured horse, dead or alive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2013 | By Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
A new federal plan for managing the Imperial Sand Dunes calls for reopening to off-road vehicles 40,000 acres that have been closed since 2000, when the site became embroiled in a legal battle involving threatened plant species. Counting that acreage, 84% of the 215,000-acre dunes system would be open to motorized recreation under the Bureau of Land Management plan, released Tuesday. The plan is the result of a 13-year process that moved in fits and starts as each iteration from the agency was challenged in court.
NATIONAL
January 5, 2011 | By Ashley Powers, Los Angeles Times
Slaughtering wild horses for food isn't a viable option for thinning herds that have strained public lands throughout the West, the federal Bureau of Land Management director told supporters of horse processing plants Tuesday. Instead, the agency plans to give mares birth control in hopes of diminishing the need for controversial horse roundups, Bob Abbey said at the Summit of the Horse conference in Las Vegas. The BLM, he said, also will continue promoting adoption and seeking locations to place captured horses other than its holding pens.
TRAVEL
February 14, 2014 | By David Kelly
BLUFF, Utah - Darkness was falling like a starry curtain as I pulled into this dusty town along the San Juan River. It was mid-November, and a cold wind was blowing in from the desert. The lights of a lone café illuminated a sign ahead. "Bluff, Utah Est. 650 AD. " My search had led me here, to a place where American history stretches deep into antiquity. I was chasing the Anasazi, Navajo for "Ancient Ones," the mysterious people who occupied these harsh lands from the 12th century BC until vanishing 700 years ago. I'd stood in their magnificent Great Houses in Chaco Canyon, N.M., and palatial cliff dwellings in Mesa Verde, Colo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2010 | By Phil Willon, Los Angeles Times
The federal Bureau of Land Management failed to follow its own safety and regulatory procedures during an August off-road desert race in San Bernardino County in which eight spectators were killed after a racer crashed into a crowd, an internal agency report released Friday concluded. Similar failures for permitted off-road events occurred throughout the 11 million acres of California desert under the federal agency's control, the report found. "We are cooperating fully with the California Highway Patrol's ongoing investigation into the accident, but our own internal review found we did not follow agency procedures in permitting and overseeing the event," acting BLM State Director Jim Abbott said in a prepared statement released Friday.
NATIONAL
November 19, 2008 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Madeleine Pickens, wife of oil tycoon T. Boone Pickens, said she would create a refuge for wild horses after the Bureau of Land Management said it might have to kill some to control the herds and protect the range. About 33,000 wild horses and burros roam the open range in 10 Western states, half of those in Nevada. The BLM wants the population to be about 27,000, to protect the herd, the range and other foraging animals. Horses that are too old or unadoptable are sent to long-term holding facilities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1995 | From Times staff reports
A team from the New York Blood Center has identified the gene that causes Bloom's syndrome, a discovery that should provide new insight into the causes of cancer. Only about 200 people worldwide have Bloom's syndrome, which causes the early onset of a broad spectrum of cancers, so that most victims die in their 20s. Dr. James L. German and his colleagues report in the journal Cell that Bloom's is caused by a mutation in a gene called BLM, which uncoils DNA when it is copied, used or repaired by the cell.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1988
Secretary of Interior Donald P. Hodel's failure to "see" any damage to the California desert confirms the lack of vision he represents on the part of the Reagan Administration. His tour of the California desert region was orchestrated and directed by the Bureau of Land Management, an agency that has much to hide from the eyes of its boss. The whole effort was BLM's attempt to thwart Sen. Alan Cranston's legislation, which would assure long-term environmental protection for the desert.
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