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July 15, 2013 | By Julie Cart
Persistent drought in the West has prompted federal agencies to begin hauling water to wild horse herds in Nevada and restricting public lands grazing across the region.  In one part of Lincoln County, Nev., the Bureau of Land Management said it is trucking 25,000 gallons of water per day, five days a week to four locations at a cost of $5,000 per day. Temperatures in the state have soared well above normal, and at the same time Nevada has received scant rain -- 0.1 to 0.5 inches recently.
April 19, 1987 | RONALD B. TAYLOR, Times Staff Writer
Sweating, his heart pounding at 148 beats a minute, U.S. Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) climbed to the rocky summit of Last Chance Peak and gazed at some of the highest and lowest spots in the nation. On the western skyline the snow-capped Sierra Nevada pierced the sky; to the south, deep in the blue shadows between the Armogosa Mountains and the Panamints, he could see Badwater, a spring 282 feet below sea level.
November 25, 2007 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Big Water, Utah So there I was, standing with about 30 other hikers in boots and backpacks, jammed into a room no bigger than a double-wide in a one-story beige government building in a destitute moonscape otherwise known as southern Utah on a warm Friday morning. If I sound surprised, I suppose I was. The day before I had flown to Flagstaff, Ariz., rented a car and driven more than two hours to Page, near the Utah border. I'd then gotten up early for a 30-minute drive to Big Water, only to find myself in the kind of hardscrabble wasteland that even rattlesnakes would be embarrassed to call home.
May 21, 1989 | MARK A. STEIN and LOUIS SAHAGUN, Times Staff Writers
President Bush's nomination of Delos Cy Jamison, an aide to former Interior Secretary James G. Watt and an adviser to a ferociously anti-environmental member of Congress, as new chief of the Bureau of Land Management has dismayed environmentalists. They fear that Jamison, if approved by the Senate, will follow the line pursued the last eight years by current Director Robert F. Burford, a Colorado cattleman who is accused of starving the bureau's major environmental programs. Ranchers, meanwhile, praised the selection of the 39-year-old Montana native as a sign that the Bush Administration will advance Reagan-era policies that opened public lands to widespread private development.
December 18, 2013 | By Rick Rojas
Three years after a truck competing in a desert off-road race careened into a crowd of spectators, a $5.8-million settlement was reached with the relatives of those killed and a dozen who were injured, their lawyers announced Wednesday. In the 2010 accident in Lucerne Valley, the pickup truck, a modified Ford Ranger, went out of control during the California 200 race and became airborne, slamming into the crowd. The accident killed eight and injured dozens. The settlement, which is the resolution of multiple lawsuits filed by victims and their families, was reached Tuesday, the lawyers said.
October 27, 2000
Re "Off-Road Vehicles Banned to Protect Desert Plant," Oct. 24: Well, it's happened again. While law-abiding, hard-working, desert-loving Americans were looking the other way, the environmental extremists have infringed upon our freedoms again. Our family has enjoyed the sand dunes near Glamis for 20 years. We often pack a lunch in our backpacks and take a daylong ride to the far reaches of the immense dunes. There is absolutely no way to see this beautiful area without off-road vehicles.
October 12, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Federal officials frustrated by ongoing destruction at a historic cave site in northern Nevada announced a $1,000 reward to help catch the vandals. The reward will go to anyone who provides information leading to the arrest and prosecution of those responsible for the vandalism at the Lovelock Cave recreation site southwest of Lovelock, Bureau of Land Management officials said.
June 22, 2005
Re "Land Study on Grazing Denounced," June 18: Bureau of Land Management hacks rewrite text that is based on scientific fact and we are to believe that having cattle overgraze on fragile Western ecosystems is good for the environment. Public comment is no longer required. The cattle industry now has virtually total control over 160 million acres of public land, and the public can do nothing about it. The Clean Water Act and the Endangered Species Act have been set aside. The policy flies in the face of all known science, environmental principles and the law of the land.
August 16, 2010 | By Phil Willon, Los Angeles Times
In company safety rules, the promoter of the California 200 off-road race where eight spectators died says that fans must stay at least 100 feet away from the course. But videos of Saturday's crash and the promoter's other races show crowds regularly lining the track, just feet away from speeding off-roaders. Mojave Desert Racing of El Monte also failed to adhere to a requirement in its contract with the Bureau of Land Management to keep spectators 50 feet away from the racing vehicles.
April 21, 2014 | By John M. Glionna, This post has been corrected. See below for details.
The battle lines are hardening in Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy's so-called range war against the federal government over his right to graze cattle on public lands. Arguments have moved from the Nevada desert to the nation's capital, where Nevada's two U.S. senators, Republican Dean Heller and Democrat Harry Reid, recently faced off on a television public affairs show in Las Vegas. Heller described Bundy's cadre of armed supporters as “patriots” during the show, "What's the Point," on KSNV-TV News 3. Reid repeated his claim that the so-called militia men are “domestic terrorists.” Officials from the Bureau of Land Management say Bundy is illegally running hundreds of head of cattle in the 600,000-acre Gold Butte area, habitat of the federally protected desert tortoise.
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