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NATIONAL
April 8, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
LAS VEGAS - Federal authorities were on the defensive Tuesday during the fourth day of their planned monthlong offensive to remove an outspoken rancher's cattle from lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management. As dozens of protesters chanted slogans in designated “First Amendment areas,” armed federal officials oversaw the roundup of hundreds of cattle belonging to Nevada cattle rancher Cliven Bundy, who for decades has thumbed his nose at Washington, refusing to pay grazing fees to run 900 cattle on federal land.
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NEWS
April 19, 1987 | RONALD B. TAYLOR, Times Staff Writer
Sweating, his heart pounding at 148 beats a minute, U.S. Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) climbed to the rocky summit of Last Chance Peak and gazed at some of the highest and lowest spots in the nation. On the western skyline the snow-capped Sierra Nevada pierced the sky; to the south, deep in the blue shadows between the Armogosa Mountains and the Panamints, he could see Badwater, a spring 282 feet below sea level.
NEWS
May 21, 1989 | MARK A. STEIN and LOUIS SAHAGUN, Times Staff Writers
President Bush's nomination of Delos Cy Jamison, an aide to former Interior Secretary James G. Watt and an adviser to a ferociously anti-environmental member of Congress, as new chief of the Bureau of Land Management has dismayed environmentalists. They fear that Jamison, if approved by the Senate, will follow the line pursued the last eight years by current Director Robert F. Burford, a Colorado cattleman who is accused of starving the bureau's major environmental programs. Ranchers, meanwhile, praised the selection of the 39-year-old Montana native as a sign that the Bush Administration will advance Reagan-era policies that opened public lands to widespread private development.
NATIONAL
April 22, 2014 | By David Horsey
Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy is a scofflaw with screwy ideas about the Constitution, and the armed oddballs who have joined his skirmish with the Bureau of Land Management are a nutty vanguard of the deluded conspiracy-mongers who dominate the far right wing in American politics. Given their actions, they do not deserve to be called patriots, but neither are they terrorists.  They have been characterized as both. Appearing together on a TV news show, Nevada's two U.S. senators disagreed about the nature of the armed men who scared off federal agents as they attempted to confiscate Bundy's cattle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 2000
Re "Off-Road Vehicles Banned to Protect Desert Plant," Oct. 24: Well, it's happened again. While law-abiding, hard-working, desert-loving Americans were looking the other way, the environmental extremists have infringed upon our freedoms again. Our family has enjoyed the sand dunes near Glamis for 20 years. We often pack a lunch in our backpacks and take a daylong ride to the far reaches of the immense dunes. There is absolutely no way to see this beautiful area without off-road vehicles.
NATIONAL
October 12, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Federal officials frustrated by ongoing destruction at a historic cave site in northern Nevada announced a $1,000 reward to help catch the vandals. The reward will go to anyone who provides information leading to the arrest and prosecution of those responsible for the vandalism at the Lovelock Cave recreation site southwest of Lovelock, Bureau of Land Management officials said.
OPINION
June 22, 2005
Re "Land Study on Grazing Denounced," June 18: Bureau of Land Management hacks rewrite text that is based on scientific fact and we are to believe that having cattle overgraze on fragile Western ecosystems is good for the environment. Public comment is no longer required. The cattle industry now has virtually total control over 160 million acres of public land, and the public can do nothing about it. The Clean Water Act and the Endangered Species Act have been set aside. The policy flies in the face of all known science, environmental principles and the law of the land.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2013 | By Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
A new federal plan for managing the Imperial Sand Dunes calls for reopening to off-road vehicles 40,000 acres that have been closed since 2000, when the site became embroiled in a legal battle involving threatened plant species. Counting that acreage, 84% of the 215,000-acre dunes system would be open to motorized recreation under the Bureau of Land Management plan, released Tuesday. The plan is the result of a 13-year process that moved in fits and starts as each iteration from the agency was challenged in court.
NEWS
May 10, 1987 | PAMELA A. MacLEAN, United Press International
Federal officials are convinced that some Idaho cattle ranchers may be deliberately setting fire to government rangeland knowing that it will be immediately reseeded with grasses better for grazing. Suspected range torching by ranchers first came to light after a federal appeals court ruling last month in San Francisco involving a 1984 Idaho arson case and a ranch foreman who is a Peruvian national.
NATIONAL
April 21, 2014 | By John M. Glionna, This post has been corrected. See below for details.
The battle lines are hardening in Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy's so-called range war against the federal government over his right to graze cattle on public lands. Arguments have moved from the Nevada desert to the nation's capital, where Nevada's two U.S. senators, Republican Dean Heller and Democrat Harry Reid, recently faced off on a television public affairs show in Las Vegas. Heller described Bundy's cadre of armed supporters as “patriots” during the show, "What's the Point," on KSNV-TV News 3. Reid repeated his claim that the so-called militia men are “domestic terrorists.” Officials from the Bureau of Land Management say Bundy is illegally running hundreds of head of cattle in the 600,000-acre Gold Butte area, habitat of the federally protected desert tortoise.
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