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Blockades

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WORLD
June 12, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Spain got tough with striking truckers who have disrupted food and fuel supplies, deploying riot police to lift blockades of a border crossing with France and a major highway outside Madrid, and making dozens of arrests. But unions representing the strikers vowed to continue the protests over rising fuel prices. The auto industry warned that if the stoppage continues, production will halt because parts are not reaching factories.
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WORLD
April 25, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
SLOVYANSK, Ukraine - At the epicenter of the pro-Russia rebellion in eastern Ukraine, masked men on Friday raced around in commandeered police cars, blowing through stop lights and flying over speed bumps. Although it was a warm spring day, the streets were nearly empty. Separatists described taking up sniper positions in an unfinished office building, only to find that two floors down their enemies had the same idea. The Ukrainian government declared Friday that it planned to surround and blockade this town, which is completely controlled by the separatists.
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WORLD
March 19, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili lifted an economic blockade on the rebellious Adzharia region in return for more of a say in local affairs. The five-day standoff had threatened to spill into armed conflict and had blocked oil shipments from the port of Batumi, the regional capital. The pact leaves Aslan Abashidze in charge of Adzharia. Saakashvili will appoint a representative to watch over the Black Sea port and customs officials, a statement released by Abashidze said.
WORLD
March 6, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
YEVPATORIA, Ukraine -- Russian troops have at least temporarily lifted their blockade of several Ukrainian military installations in Crimea, commanders said Thursday. “Wednesday late at night the Russian paratroopers which deployed all over our base suddenly packed and went away,” said Lt. Col. Olexandr Lomako, deputy commander of Ukraine's anti-aircraft regiment stationed in Yevpatoria, a resort city about 60 miles northeast of Sevastopol. “But when leaving, their commander said that they will be back.” The Yevpatoria unit was one of many surrounded or invaded by unidentified gunmen last weekend as heavily armed troops in Russian military fatigues and Russian-registered vehicles moved onto the peninsula to take control of the airport, bases and other key installations.
NEWS
September 28, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
For the past three weeks, the Armenian capital of Yerevan has been slowly strangled by an economic blockade imposed by the neighboring Soviet republic of Azerbaijan. Freight trains carrying food and fuel to Armenia have been halted in Azerbaijan, the major highways into Armenia are blocked by armed gangs, and military airlifts have been able to bring in only limited supplies.
NEWS
July 4, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Palestinians lifted their blockade of Jewish settlements, ending a 12-hour standoff in which Israeli and Palestinian troops had scuffled, screamed accusations and pointed guns at one another. It was the most serious confrontation between the two sides in two years, with Israeli troops bringing in armored personnel carriers and the Palestinians blocking roads with truck convoys. At one point, Israeli Defense Minister Yitzhak Mordechai appealed to the U.S. Mideast peace envoy, Dennis B.
NEWS
September 9, 1989 | From Associated Press
The newly reinstated rule requiring Gulf Coast shrimpers to put turtle-escape doors on their nets drew scattered protests Friday, including an apparently unsuccessful blockade in Louisiana waters. Critics complain that too much of the catch escapes with the endangered turtles because they must use so-called turtle excluder devices (TEDs). Shrimpers in Louisiana set up a 30-boat blockade of a shipping channel Friday morning, Coast Guard officials said, but ships were able to navigate around
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1989 | From Associated Press
Striking public employees Friday lifted blockades of ports and airports that have isolated this French Mediterranean island for more than a week, and they accepted a government proposal for talks. Airlines operated normally from the two main airports at Ajaccio and Bastia, carrying away tourists trapped in Corsica since the air and sea shutdown started 10 days ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1990
The founder of the militant anti-abortion group Operation Rescue and two of his deputies pleaded no contest Monday to misdemeanor charges stemming from a massive illegal blockade of a woman's clinic near downtown Los Angeles in 1989. Randall Terry, 31, of Binghamton, N.Y., who founded the group, and Michael McMonagle, 37, of Philadelphia, pleaded no contest to a single misdemeanor count of blocking access to the clinic.
NEWS
September 21, 1989 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
A federal appeals court in New York on Wednesday ruled unanimously that a 19th-Century law that entitled blacks to protection from the Ku Klux Klan can be used by women who claim that their civil rights were violated by groups that blockade abortion clinics. The decision by the U.S. 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals flies squarely in the face of a ruling issued on Monday by a federal judge in Los Angeles. In that ruling, U.S. District Judge A.
WORLD
February 25, 2014 | By Zulfiqar Ali and Shashank Bengali
PESHAWAR, Pakistan - In a boost to U.S.-led forces in Afghanistan, a provincial court on Tuesday ordered that protesters end their blockade of the main NATO supply route through Pakistan. A two-member bench of the Peshawar High Court declared that protesters' ad hoc inspections of container trucks traveling into Afghanistan, which frequently barred trucks carrying NATO goods, were illegal and unconstitutional. Supporters of the Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf party, or PTI, the ruling party in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province, had set up unofficial checkpoints along a highway passing through the provincial capital of Peshawar since Nov. 24 to protest U.S. drone strikes in the country's tribal areas.
WORLD
December 4, 2013 | By Zulfiqar Ali and Mark Magnier
PESHAWAR, Pakistan - It's been a daily routine for the last week. Dozens of young men rush toward container trucks stopped at a toll plaza outside Peshawar, demanding to see customs documents to ensure the vehicles aren't carrying supplies for NATO forces in Afghanistan. Pakistani police and paramilitary forces nearby watch the unruly group without intervening. The attempted blockade was sparked by former cricket star and political leader Imran Khan of Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa province, who vowed late last month to stop all NATO-bound trucks through the area of northwestern Pakistan until the CIA halts its drone campaign in the country.
WORLD
November 22, 2012 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
RAFAH, Gaza Strip - Seated on a muddy hill, Sulieman Masri glumly scanned the giant crater that was once a smuggling tunnel used to support his family. After the Israeli airstrikes of the last week, Thursday morning was the first safe time to venture out. He discovered his tunnel was among 140 Israel destroyed. Now it's now a massive sand pit coated with gray explosives residue. It would take two months to rebuild at the cost of $20,000. "But I've heard that they are going to open the borders, which could put the tunnels out of business," he said.
WORLD
November 2, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
Truck driver Rahman Anwar, 33, was on National Highway 39 in September when his vehicle was surrounded by protesters angry because he was breaking their economic blockade. They smashed his head with a boulder and he died days later without regaining consciousness. On Tuesday, the Kuki tribal group voted to end its 92-day blockade of the road in remote Manipur state after the government agreed to consider establishing a new administrative district known as Sadar Hills, part of the Kuki community's bid for greater autonomy.
OPINION
October 25, 2011 | By Jehanne Henry and Gerry Simpson
When South Sudan declared independence in July, the international community breathed a sigh of relief. A difficult six-year process, set forth in the ambitious 2005 peace agreement that ended Sudan's 22-year-long civil war, was finally over. The world appeared to feel it could stop focusing on Sudan. But Sudan's wars have not ended. They have, in fact, multiplied. Five of Sudan's 16 states are mired in armed conflicts. Since June, new conflicts have erupted in two volatile states — Southern Kordofan and Blue Nile — just north of the South Sudan border, while the three states in the western region of Darfur are still a war zone, although that conflict has dropped from the headlines.
OPINION
July 17, 2011 | By M.J. Rosenberg
Suddenly, all the major pro-Israel organizations are anguishing about "delegitimization. " Those who criticize Israeli policies are accused of trying to delegitimize Israel, which supposedly means denying Israel's right to exist. The concept of delegitimization has been used as a weapon against Israel's critics at least as far back as 1975, when then-U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Daniel Patrick Moynihan accused the international body of delegitimizing Israel by passing a "Zionism is racism " resolution.
WORLD
February 27, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Nepal's rebel chief Pushpa Kamal Dahal, also known as Prachanda, said he was lifting a countrywide blockade of roads to ease the discomfort of common people. The rebels had announced the blockade in response to King Gyanendra's Feb. 1 decision to sack the government and declare a state of emergency. The insurgents, who have been fighting since 1996 to topple the monarchy and establish communist rule, blocked the highways with crude bombs, mines and boulders.
WORLD
August 25, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Maoist rebels said they were suspending a blockade of Nepal's capital, Katmandu, that had cut it off from the rest of the country for a week. But in a fax to media outlets, they threatened further action if the government failed to release jailed guerrillas. Fearing violence, most people stayed off the roads into and out of Katmandu since the blockade began, severely limiting the flow of goods and stranding thousands of travelers.
WORLD
July 9, 2011 | By Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times
Federal police in western Mexico were locked in armed clashes Friday with a faction of the drug gang known as La Familia, two weeks after they said they had all but vanquished the group. Authorities said seven gunmen were killed in the violence, which began late Thursday after drug henchmen set cars ablaze to block roads across the state of Michoacan. The so-called narco-blockades, often meant to hinder police, appeared designed to signal to authorities that a wing of La Familia was still very much a force.
OPINION
July 6, 2011
Their solo days are done Re "Hybrids? In the past lane," July 2 Some drivers have the misguided impression that a carpool lane is "the fast lane," and they routinely break the speed limit. I don't, and I don't care for the aggressive driving of those who do. Recently one driver was able to bully me (by tailing me) all the way up to 85 miles per hour before I was finally able to exit the lane and let him blow past. Had I kept increasing my speed, I have no doubt he would have matched whatever I did and kept the same dangerous distance from me. Speed-limit enforcement has been very lax in recent years, and if the state were serious about its budget woes, increased enforcement would be an ideal place to start generating more revenue.
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