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Blockbuster Entertainment Corp

BUSINESS
April 12, 1994 | JAMES BATES and KATHRYN HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With its proposed merger with Blockbuster Entertainment Corp. on increasingly shaky ground, speculation is growing that Viacom Inc. will soon put a chunk of assets up for sale to trim the debt from its $10-billion acquisition of Paramount Communications Inc. Meanwhile, regional telephone giant and Viacom partner Nynex Corp.
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BUSINESS
August 24, 1994 | KATHRYN HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Directors of Blockbuster Entertainment Corp. voted unanimously Tuesday to recommend a once-doubtful merger with Viacom Inc., setting a Sept. 29 date for a shareholders meeting to vote on the deal. The outcome could still be a cliffhanger, however, if Viacom's stock price drops as it did in the months following the Jan. 7 merger agreement struck by the two companies.
BUSINESS
January 11, 1994 | KATHRYN HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
QVC Network Chairman Barry Diller said Monday that he does not plan to increase his bid for Paramount Communications Inc., despite Viacom Inc.'s move last week to boost the cash portion of its offer for the entertainment company. QVC is still in the lead, with a cash-and-stock offer valued at $500 million more than Viacom's bid at the close of trading Monday. But Wall Street traders said they expect Viacom to improve the non-cash portion of its bid before Jan.
NEWS
January 8, 1994 | JOHN LIPPMAN and JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a cliffhanger worthy of a Hollywood box office hit, Viacom Inc. and Blockbuster Entertainment Corp. agreed to merge Friday as part of an eleventh-hour gambit to derail a marriage between QVC Network and Paramount Communications Inc. As part of the proposed merger--the result of marathon negotiations over the last three days--Viacom-Blockbuster said it will sweeten its bid to $105 a share, or a total of $6.5 billion, for 50.1% of Paramount's stock.
BUSINESS
July 22, 1990 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Blockbuster Video held a franchisees convention in Los Angeles last year, Hollywood rolled out a star-quality welcome. There was a catered barbecue and presentation on the old Burbank Studios lot and a VIP tour of Universal Studios. Conventioneers with spouses and children in tow were even treated to a private screening of the sentimental movie "Dad." Such are the perks for a company that dominates video retailing the way "Batman" dominated the box office. Blockbuster Entertainment Corp.
SPORTS
December 11, 1992 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fifty million dollars can help put a club like the Tampa Bay Lightning on the ice in its first year of existence and make it an exciting, skilled team that even led the Norris Division for several days this season. Or, $50 million can get you the hapless Ottawa Senators, winners of three games.
SPORTS
January 31, 1993 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the NFL expanded to Tampa Bay in 1976, there was no talk of the Buccaneers helping the league secure a better network television contract. When Major League Baseball expanded to Seattle in 1977, no one marveled at how the Mariners would strengthen baseball ownership and improve the sport's credibility. And when the NBA expanded to Minnesota in 1989, league marketing directors didn't look for the Timberwolves to set an example they all could follow.
BUSINESS
June 6, 1993 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former 20th Century Fox chief Joe Roth a few weeks back was praising Blockbuster Entertainment Corp.'s drive to diversify beyond the video retailing business. "They have to," Roth explained in a speech to Los Angeles entertainment lawyers. "Because most of those video stores are going to be pizza places soon." Roth's suggestion that Blockbuster soon would be better off making its dough in pizzas than videos was more than enough to give executives here heartburn when they read it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1997 | GREG SANDOVAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four Blockbuster video rental stores in the Antelope Valley decided to pull the Oscar-winning 1979 film "The Tin Drum" from their shelves last month after the movie was declared obscene in Oklahoma City. But on Wednesday, following inquiries by The Times, the stores abruptly scrapped the ban. The Oklahoma City action is being fought in court by the American Civil Liberties Union as unconstitutional.
BUSINESS
October 20, 1992 | JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blockbuster Entertainment, the country's leading video retailer, expanded into recorded music on Monday by purchasing 236 Music Plus and Sound Warehouse stores from Los Angeles-based Shamrock Holdings. The $185-million acquisition satisfies Blockbuster's long-term goal of breaking into the recorded-music retail industry and also gives it a platform for expanding into the fast-growing video game and computer software business.
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