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BUSINESS
November 15, 2009 | P.J. Huffstutter and Jerry Hirsch
On most days, Andrea Deckard can be found in her home office, digging through stacks of coupons and grocery receipts for money saving tips and recipes that she can share with readers of her Mommy Snacks blog. That is, when the stay-at-home mom isn't being wined and dined by giant food companies. Earlier this year, Frito-Lay flew her to Los Angeles to meet celebrities such as model Brooke Burke and the Spice Girls' Mel B, while pitching her on its latest snack ad campaign. More recently, Nestle paid to put her and 16 other so-called "mommy bloggers" -- and one daddy blogger -- up at the posh Langham Huntington hotel in Pasadena, treated them to a private show at the Magic Castle in Hollywood and sent packages of frozen Omaha Steaks to their families to tide them over while the women were away learning all about the company's latest product lines.
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OPINION
March 18, 2006
Re "You've got (paid) mail," editorial, March 15 You are dead wrong about AOL charging fees for mass e-mails. Serious activist organizations such as environmental groups, political bloggers and social reform groups, which do not have bottomless budgets as do corporations, porn sites and newspapers, will be affected. This will curtail what little freedom of speech and information is left. It will turn the Net into just another advertisement supplement, such as Sunday newspapers. FRANK STANTON Campbell
BUSINESS
June 17, 2008 | Thomas S. Mulligan, Times Staff Writer
The Associated Press is trying to back out of an old media-new media fight that it didn't quite mean to pick. The 162-year-old news service will sit down with representatives of a bloggers group Thursday to devise guidelines allowing Internet commentators to use excerpts from AP stories and broadcasts. The AP provoked outrage in the blogosphere last week when it issued a blunt legal demand that the Drudge Retort, a small online news and commentary site, remove seven posts containing snippets -- all less than 80 words long -- from AP stories.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 2010 | By Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times
Political ads sent by text message or placed on websites will have to include a message to voters disclosing who is behind them under new rules approved Friday by the state's campaign watchdog agency. The rule from the California Fair Political Practices Commission subjects online ads to the standards that apply to television, radio and print political advertising. "What we have here is a logical extension of existing rules for more traditional forms of political communications into the online universe," said Commission Chairman Dan Schnur.
NATIONAL
May 30, 2012 | By David Horsey
“What's black and white and read all over?” That is the setup for what used to be the first joke learned by most every American kid. These days, delivering the punch line would leave the kids bewildered. They might just say, “What's a newspaper?” In our new media age, that is not a question with an obvious answer. Ask the people in New Orleans who just found out their venerable Times-Picayune will no longer be available in print every day. Based in a city and state with a perennially high level of corruption and dysfunction, the Times-Picayune has been a powerful and admired community watchdog.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2005
David SHAW has truly missed the point ["The Blog Squad Can Add Another Notch to its Belt," Feb. 20]. As an educator, parent and concerned citizen I am looking for truth, not opinions. Start asking the real questions and come up with some solutions! It's time for those in the world of publication to realize people like myself are fed up with all this foolishness. I have read some of those bloggers and found them to be insightful and refreshing. You can attack them, but the reason they are growing is because they meet the need of the times.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2008 | Deborah Netburn, Times Staff Writer
As the writer's strike goes on and on and on, we'll take a look at how viewers are coping with an unscripted world -- because a lack of decent entertainment affects us all. In Episode 1 of our series we look at the bereft fans of "24." D-Day (Debut Day!) was supposed to be Jan. 13. "Day 7," they called it in the online "24" world.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2005
HAS the rise of movie bloggers corrupted the Oscars "from a celebration of movies into a silly exercise in Ouija board-style predictions and lamebrained analysis"? Los Angeles Times staff writer Patrick Goldstein suggested as much in Tuesday's column "The Big Picture." The response from the blogosphere has been equally sharp and biting. Here are excerpts of responses from some bloggers. David Poland MovieCityNews.com You know, Patrick ... it's getting a little sad. For years ... your couple of columns during the season were chewed on and debated like they meant something.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2012 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy, Los Angeles Times
Sinéad O'Connor and 50 Cent couldn't be more different, but when it comes to over-sharing on Twitter, the 1980s icon and gruff rapper have quite a bit in common. While we've become accustomed to Kanye West's rants and boasts on the social media site (such as crowning himself the new Steve Jobs this week), or Laurieann Gibson's smackdowns with Lady Gaga fans, O'Connor and 50 are the latest in a recent rash of celebrities — namely musicians — whose meltdowns and bouts of TMI (Too Much Information)
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