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Blood Doping

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May 21, 2010 | Diane Pucin
Seven-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong on Thursday defiantly denied charges made by disgraced former teammate Floyd Landis that he had used performance-enhancing drugs. Armstrong then dramatically crashed out of the Amgen Tour of California, caught in a tangle of at least 20 falling cyclists, leaving the race with a bloodied eye and swollen elbow. Whether Armstrong's reputation will withstand these latest accusations is expected to be a continuing story as he pursues an eighth Tour de France title this summer.
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May 3, 2013 | By David Wharton
The Lance Armstrong doping scandal continues to reverberate through Spain, where authorities have launched an investigation into several figures allegedly linked to the American cyclist. Prosecutors are looking at Spanish citizens mentioned in the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency report that led Armstrong to confess that he used performance-enhancing drugs to help him win seven Tour de France titles. The report mentions doctors Luis Garcia del Moral and Pedro Celaya, and trainer Pepe Marti.
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June 14, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
There are new doping charges against seven-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong , but do you believe them? On Wednesday, the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency brought formal doping charges against him that could result in him being stripped of his Tour de France titles. USADA says it collected bloodfrom Armstrong in 2009 and 2010 that was "fully consistent with blood ma­nipu­la­tion including EPO use and/or blood transfusions. " Armstrong responded by saying, "I have never doped, and, unlike many of my accusers, I have competed as an endurance athlete for 25 years with no spike in performance, passed more than 500 drug tests and never failed one. That USADA ignores this fundamental distinction and charges me instead of the admitted dopers says far more about USADA, its lack of fairness and this vendetta than it does about my guilt or innocence.
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June 15, 2012 | By Melissa Rohlin
Lance Armstrong's reputation is in jeopardy but it appears as though his wallet isn't taking too big of a hit. The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency has brought formal doping charges against Armstrong, a seven-time Tour de France winner, that could result in him being stripped of his titles. Despite the allegations, none of Armstrong's premier sponsors, including Nike, Oakley, 24 Hour Fitness and Trek have abandoned him, according to USA Today.  "Our relationship with Lance remains as strong as ever," Nike told the newspaper in a statement.
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January 10, 1985
Some U.S. cyclists received controversial "blood doping" transfusions hours before competing in the Los Angeles Olympic Games, according to a team physician who says an official resigned over the issue. The physician, Dr. Thomas B. Dickson Jr. of Allentown, Pa., said he expressed his opposition to blood doping, which involves transfusions of red blood cells in an attempt to increase endurance, but was ignored.
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January 19, 1985 | KENNETH REICH, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Cycling Federation prohibited blood doping Friday, becoming the first national sports federation either in the United States or abroad to move beyond deploring the practice of transfusions to a formal ban against them. The cycling group, meeting at Colorado Springs, Colo., set penalties of 30 days suspension from competition for a first offense, 180 days for a second and indefinite suspension for a third.
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January 12, 1985 | KENNETH REICH
Blood doping, also known as blood packing or blood boosting, involves transfusing one or two pints of blood into an athlete between six hours and six days before competition, the purpose being to increase the oxygen-carrying capacity and, consequently, endurance. The total volume of blood in the recipient's body is temporarily increased by the amount of the transfusion.
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January 12, 1985 | KENNETH REICH, Times Staff Writer
The physician reported to have given blood doping transfusions last summer to a third of the 24-member U.S. Olympic cycling team--including five medal winners--said Friday he had done nothing "illegal or unethical or detrimental to any athlete." Dr. Herman Falsetti, a University of Iowa heart specialist who also has a home in Laguna Beach and is licensed to practice in California, said: "I know of no Olympic rules that would prohibit (blood doping).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Mark Whitehead, a member of the U.S. track cycling team that participated in blood doping during the 1984 Summer Olympics, creating a scandal that led to the practice being banned from the sport, has died. He was 50. Whitehead died in Frisco, Texas, while attending the USA Cycling Junior Track National Championships, USA Cycling announced Wednesday . The organization said no further details were available. His 20 national championships included the team pursuit in 1984, which contributed to his being chosen for the U.S. squad that competed in the Los Angeles Games, the cycling website VeloNews reported . Encouraged by their coach — and less than a week before the Olympics — Whitehead and seven other members of the U.S. cycling team took "advantage of the dubious practice called blood boosting," David Wallechinsky wrote in "The Complete Book of the Olympics.
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January 26, 1985 | KENNETH REICH, Times Staff Writer
To Olympic cyclist Thurlow Rogers, blood doping is only part of a much larger problem faced these days by athletes in all sports. That problem, according to Rogers, who was sixth in the men's Olympic road race at Mission Viejo last summer, revolves around which artificial stimuli to athletic performance are going to be accepted, which are going to be banned, and which it is actually feasible to ban. Rogers--one of 16 members of the 24-member U.S.
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June 14, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
There are new doping charges against seven-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong , but do you believe them? On Wednesday, the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency brought formal doping charges against him that could result in him being stripped of his Tour de France titles. USADA says it collected bloodfrom Armstrong in 2009 and 2010 that was "fully consistent with blood ma­nipu­la­tion including EPO use and/or blood transfusions. " Armstrong responded by saying, "I have never doped, and, unlike many of my accusers, I have competed as an endurance athlete for 25 years with no spike in performance, passed more than 500 drug tests and never failed one. That USADA ignores this fundamental distinction and charges me instead of the admitted dopers says far more about USADA, its lack of fairness and this vendetta than it does about my guilt or innocence.
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June 14, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
Matt Cain pitched the 22nd perfect game in Major League Baseball history on Wednesday night. Of course, he did it for the San Francisco Giants, which takes some of the luster off of it for Dodgers fans. Cain struck out 14 Houston Astros, tying Sandy Koufax for the most strikeouts in a perfect game. Cain threw 19 first-pitch strikes and never faced a 2-and-0 count. He also got help from two outstanding defensive plays. Left fielder Melky Cabrera chased down Chris Snyder's one-out flyball in the sixth, scurrying back to make a leaping catch on the warning track.
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January 22, 2012 | Mike DiGiovanna
Baseball royalty gathered Saturday at the Riviera Country Club, where 1,623 home runs in the form of Henry Aaron and Sadaharu Oh sat side by side in a cramped news conference room, the long-ball count swelling to 2,209 when Frank Robinson walked in a little late. Both Aaron, 77, and Oh, 71, in Los Angeles for a World Children's Baseball Fair 20th anniversary luncheon, were introduced as "home run kings," even though Oh, who used his trademark "flamingo" leg kick to hit 868 homers in Japan from 1959 to 1980, is the only crown-holder of the two. Aaron slugged 755 homers for Milwaukee and Atlanta from 1954 to 1976, surpassing Babe Ruth's record of 714 amid hate mail and death threats in 1974 and holding the top spot for 33 years.
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July 15, 2011 | Richard A. Serrano
The judge in the Roger Clemens federal perjury trial abruptly declared a mistrial on the second day of testimony, leaving government attorneys weighing whether to try again or drop charges that the former All-Star pitcher lied when he testified before Congress that he never used steroids or other performance-enhancing drugs. The government's case came apart Thursday when prosecutors violated U.S. District Judge Reggie Walton's order by inadvertently allowing the jury to view statements from a U.S. congressman discussing the credibility of one of the key witnesses against the former All-Star baseball pitcher.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Mark Whitehead, a member of the U.S. track cycling team that participated in blood doping during the 1984 Summer Olympics, creating a scandal that led to the practice being banned from the sport, has died. He was 50. Whitehead died in Frisco, Texas, while attending the USA Cycling Junior Track National Championships, USA Cycling announced Wednesday . The organization said no further details were available. His 20 national championships included the team pursuit in 1984, which contributed to his being chosen for the U.S. squad that competed in the Los Angeles Games, the cycling website VeloNews reported . Encouraged by their coach — and less than a week before the Olympics — Whitehead and seven other members of the U.S. cycling team took "advantage of the dubious practice called blood boosting," David Wallechinsky wrote in "The Complete Book of the Olympics.
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September 15, 2010 | By Lance Pugmire
Federal prosecutors have obtained a telephone conversation secretly recorded six years ago by three-time Tour de France champion Greg LeMond in which he and a woman close to Lance Armstrong discuss her being present in 1996 when others say Armstrong told his cancer doctors about his use of performance-enhancing drugs. The tape recording and transcript of that conversation are expected to be presented to a federal grand jury in Los Angeles looking into charges of widespread drug use in professional cycling, according to sources close to the investigation who are not authorized to speak publicly about it. Prosecutors have subpoenaed the woman who sources say is Stephanie McIlvain, a longtime liaison to Armstrong for one of his major sponsors, the eyewear company Oakley Inc. LeMond was calling McIlvain in connection with a separate business dispute he was having with one of his sponsors when he raised the subject of what McIlvain heard in Armstrong's Indiana hospital room.
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July 23, 2010 | By Diane Pucin
Floyd Landis was interviewed on ABC's "Nightline" in a segment that aired Friday night and reiterated his assertion that he observed fellow cyclist Lance Armstrong use banned performance-enhancing drugs. In the interview taped in Oregon, where Landis is racing in the Cascade Cycling Classic (he is 78th after the prologue and two stages), Landis said that Armstrong gave him testosterone patches and that he witnessed Armstrong receiving transfusions used for blood doping. Landis was asked, "Did you see Lance Armstrong receiving transfusions?"
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April 18, 2009 | Diane Pucin
He once was a humble cyclist with a reputation for grit, whether riding with broken bones so painful that he ground 11 of his teeth to nubs or crying openly during the 2004 Tour de France when his beloved dog and constant companion Tugboat had to be put down. On Friday, Tyler Hamilton, 38, announced his retirement from cycling after failing a doping test for the second time in his career that included a dramatic stage win at the 2003 Tour de France and a gold medal at the 2004 Olympics.
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July 23, 2010 | By Diane Pucin
Floyd Landis was interviewed on ABC's "Nightline" in a segment that aired Friday night and reiterated his assertion that he observed fellow cyclist Lance Armstrong use banned performance-enhancing drugs. In the interview taped in Oregon, where Landis is racing in the Cascade Cycling Classic (he is 78th after the prologue and two stages), Landis said that Armstrong gave him testosterone patches and that he witnessed Armstrong receiving transfusions used for blood doping. Landis was asked, "Did you see Lance Armstrong receiving transfusions?"
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May 22, 2010 | Diane Pucin
Seven-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong went on the attack Friday, even though he was a day removed from the Tour of California after having crashed just outside Visalia. Posted on his team's website Friday morning was a series of e-mails to and from former teammate Floyd Landis in which the disgraced cyclist appears angry and bitter, at one point ignoring pleas from his sponsor to avoid a public fight. It also was a day in which a skinny Australian named Michael Rogers battled high desert winds and a gruesome amount of up and down mountain climbing to cling to a four-second lead in the Amgen Tour of California after a 135-mile, six-hour-plus Stage 6 ride from Palmdale to Big Bear.
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