Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBlood Pressure
IN THE NEWS

Blood Pressure

FEATURED ARTICLES
HEALTH
February 8, 2010
It's wise to pay attention to your blood pressure -- but don't lose sleep over it. That may make matters worse. A five-year study published last year found that among nearly 600 adults (average age 40 at the start of the study) the fewer hours of sleep people got, the higher their blood pressure was likely to be and the more likely it was that their blood pressure would increase over time. For every hour less sleep participants got, their chances of developing high blood pressure over the study period zoomed up by 37%. Another study of more than 10,000 adults ages 35 to 55 found that women who averaged six hours of sleep a night were 42% more likely to develop high blood pressure than women who averaged seven hours -- though it found no such effect for men. A 2006 study reported a similar finding for both genders: Of those who slept five hours a night or less, 24% developed high blood pressure during eight to 10 years of follow-up, versus 12% of those who slept seven or eight hours.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
March 3, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Discouraging news for diabetics who are keen to ward off memory problems and keep their brains in peak condition: New research has found that using medication to aggressively drive down blood pressure or improve lipid levels does not do more than standard therapy to stem the decline in cognition that's common among such patients. In fact, aggressively lowering systolic blood pressure may accelerate brain shrinkage, which is a hallmark of dementia, the new study found. The findings , published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine, emerge from a large and long-running clinical trial aimed at figuring out what measures might improve the health prospects of people at highest risk of cardiovascular disease.
Advertisement
HEALTH
June 28, 2010 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
I have taken naproxen regularly for several years, having had knee replacement and shoulder surgery. When I take naproxen, my blood pressure goes up from 115/70 to about 145/94. I was told my blood pressure problem was unrelated to the drug, but when I quit taking naproxen, my blood pressure went back down to 115/70. A recent report from Denmark (Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, July 2010) involved reviewing the health records of more than 1 million people taking NSAID pain relievers such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, etc.)
SCIENCE
February 24, 2014 | Mary MacVean
A vegetarian diet may help lower blood pressure, researchers who reviewed data from 39 previous studies said Monday. The researchers suggested that a vegetarian diet could be an alternative to drugs for people whose blood pressure is too high -- a condition known as hypertension and one that is a risk factor for heart disease and other problems.  About a third of Americans have high blood pressure. Seven clinical trials, with 311 participants, and 32 observational studies, including 21,604 people, were analyzed by researchers from Japan and the Physicans Committee for Responsible Medicine in Washington, which advocates for plant-based diets.
HEALTH
February 8, 2010 | By Karen Ravn
Blood circulating through your body moves with a certain force -- that's your blood pressure. This force can be affected by how strongly the heart is pumping and by the size of the vessels the blood is moving through. Blood moves through large arteries into smaller vessels called arterioles, which can expand and contract. When they expand, blood pressure goes down. When they contract, blood pressure goes up. (The body has some very good reasons and complicated systems for doing this.) How is blood pressure measured?
HEALTH
February 8, 2010 | By Karen Ravn
Some high blood pressure patients do all the right things -- make every recommended lifestyle choice, take their drugs completely as prescribed -- and they still can't get their blood pressure down. A trial now underway may offer them new hope. It is testing the Rheos Baroreflex Hypertension Therapy System, a small electronic device (with a big name) that is implanted under the collarbone. Wire leads from it are attached to the left and right carotid arteries, where they send electrical impulses that activate the body's own blood pressure control system and tell the brain to reduce blood pressure.
SCIENCE
January 13, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
As far as scientists can tell, green tea has many health benefits. It contains natural antioxidants called flavonoids that appear to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke and various types of cancer, including cancers of the breast, lung and skin. Plus it tastes good. But a new report in the journal Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics flags a possible problem with green tea: It may prevent the body from absorbing a drug used to treat high blood pressure, probably due to one of the antioxidants for which it is prized.
SCIENCE
December 18, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Experts are urging doctors to ease up on using medications to control blood pressure in older patients. Rather than aim for a target blood pressure of 140/90 mm Hg, the target will be relaxed slightly to 150/90 mm Hg, according to new guidelines issued Wednesday. The authors of the new guidelines , published in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., emphasized that they were not changing the definition of high blood pressure. Rather, they are recognizing that data from randomized clinical trials do not show that using drugs to nudge down systolic blood pressure from 150 to 140 provides any health benefit.
SCIENCE
December 3, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
This is your heart on an energy drink, and it's contracting significantly faster than it was before you opened that can full of liquid stimulant. So says a team of cardiac radiologists who were concerned about adverse side effects from energy drinks, especially on heart function. Energy drinks like Red Bull, Monster, 5-Hour Energy and Rockstar are involved in tens of thousands of emergency room visits each year. In the U.S. alone, nearly 21,000 people went to E.R.s after consuming energy drinks in 2011, according to a 2013 report from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.
SCIENCE
November 21, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
A study that culls health data for 1.8 million people over more than 57 years of research finds that controlling high blood pressure, cholesterol and glucose could halve the number of heart attacks attributable to being overweight or obese and pare the number of strokes linked to excess weight by 75%. In populations in which being overweight or obese are widespread, the new research offers a guide to which public health policies most effectively drive...
OPINION
October 20, 2013 | By Michael P. Jones
I am a gastroenterologist. I research, diagnose and treat digestive disorders. Those disorders include heartburn, also known as acid reflux or, if you really want to scare the customers, gastroesophageal reflux disease. I am also a heartburn sufferer. Sometimes. I used to be a pretty frequent heartburn sufferer. A few years ago, when I was intent on being a "gastroenterologist's gastroenterologist," I was seeing lots of patients, competing for funding to do research and writing and presenting papers.
SCIENCE
October 14, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
You might think from reading the medical news these days that our voracious appetite for food, drugs and sex is a bad thing. That neglects clear evidence that the powerful and reliable impulse to do things that make us feel good has been essential to our survival as a species. So it was just a matter of time until someone figured out how to harness those dependable hedonic impulses to improve our health. In a clever bit of bioengineering, a group of Swiss researchers has done just that, building a pleasure-triggered device that, in mice, prompts the production of a natural agent that lowers blood pressure.
SCIENCE
September 11, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
How do you get doctors to do a better job of controlling their patients' high blood pressure? Pay them, according to the results of an unusual clinical trial. For a typical doctor treating 1,000 patients for hypertension, extra payments of $1,648 were enough to get blood pressure under control - or at least get doctors to prescribe the right drugs and recommend the right lifestyle changes - for 84 additional patients. Those payments (distributed over 20 months) amounted to about 1.6% of the doctor's annual salary.
SCIENCE
September 3, 2013 | By Monte Morin
At least 200,000 Americans die needlessly each year due to heart disease, stroke and high blood pressure, and more than half of these deaths occur in people younger than 65, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. All of these premature deaths could be prevented by quitting smoking, controlling blood pressure, keeping cholesterol levels in check and taking aspirin when recommended by a physician, public health experts said. "These findings are really striking.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|