Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBlood Pressure
IN THE NEWS

Blood Pressure

NEWS
September 30, 1988 | Associated Press
Researchers have isolated and purified a mystery substance they suspect is linked to high blood pressure, an affliction that leaves nearly 60 million Americans at dramatically higher risk of stroke and heart disease, it was announced Thursday. People with high blood pressure are believed to have increased levels of the substance, which researchers have yet to identify, in their blood.
Advertisement
HEALTH
November 12, 2007 | From wire reports
For people with high blood pressure, the condition can prove tougher to control in the winter. In a five-year study that focused on blood pressure readings, 443,632 U.S. military veterans with hypertension, or high blood pressure, were studied in 15 cities, including such far-flung locales as chilly Anchorage and warm San Juan, Puerto Rico.
HEALTH
June 27, 2005 | Elena Conis
Vibrantly colored hibiscus flowers originated in the tropics of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, but today they're a common sight worldwide. Hundreds of species of hibiscus have been identified, with some boasting blooms up to a foot in diameter. In some countries, the papery-petaled flowers are used to make soft drinks and dyes, while other parts of the plant are used as food staples.
HEALTH
June 5, 2000 | THOMAS MAUGH II
Doctors should be more aggressive in treating patients who have both diabetes and high blood pressure, the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute said Tuesday in a new clinical guideline. An estimated 11 million Americans are victims of Type 2 diabetes, which generally begins in middle age, and 5 million of these have high blood pressure.
HEALTH
December 29, 1997
Fruits and vegetables contain high levels of "good" potassium salts that may fight high blood pressure and reduce the risk of stroke, UC San Francisco researchers reported in the Dec. 23 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Curtis Morris and his colleagues at the university studied how blood pressure was affected by ordinary table salt (sodium chloride), potassium chloride and the plant salts potassium bicarbonate and potassium citrate.
HEALTH
May 30, 2005 | Elena Conis
Magnesium is sometimes called "nature's calcium channel blocker" because, like that class of heart drugs, the mineral blocks calcium from entering cells, relaxing blood vessels and lowering blood pressure. The body uses the essential mineral to maintain healthy bones and muscles, to manufacture proteins and fatty acids and to help the blood clot. Low intake has been linked to allergies, asthma, migraines, heart disease, chronic fatigue and hyperactivity.
NEWS
November 14, 1985 | United Press International
Sen. Lawton Chiles (D-Fla.) was admitted to Bethesda Naval Hospital on Wednesday for tests due to high blood pressure, his office said in a statement. Chiles' blood pressure was found to be "sufficiently high to warrant thorough medical tests," the statement said.
NEWS
September 8, 1992 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
People with high blood pressure are at greater risk for heart attacks, strokes and other problems. They are advised to monitor their condition regularly and follow doctors' advice for taking medication or making lifestyle changes. But what about those whose blood pressure levels are below the "normal" blood pressure reading of 120/80? Dr.
NATIONAL
August 24, 2004 | From Reuters
The number of Americans who have high blood pressure has risen by nearly a third over the last decade, researchers reported Monday. The usual suspects are to blame: aging, obesity, lack of exercise and too much junk food, the U.S. government research team found. At least 65 million Americans have hypertension, defined as blood pressure of 140/90 or more, a medical diagnosis of high blood pressure or the use of drugs to lower blood pressure. This equals nearly one-third of U.S.
NEWS
November 26, 1992 | SALLY SQUIRES
Experts in high blood pressure are recommending a switch back to the basics. Gone is the trend toward new, high-blood-pressure medications with fancy names and high prices. Instead, the new national guidelines recommend that doctors treating high blood pressure first prescribe diuretics and beta blockers, two of the oldest classes of medication used for the problem.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|