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Blood Pressure

NEWS
September 29, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
High blood pressure that's only a little above normal might increase the risk of stroke, researchers found. The researchers analyzed data from 12 studies with a total of 518,520 participants to assess the stroke risk of slightly elevated blood pressure, also known as prehypertension. The review was released online Wednesday in the journal Neurology . Almost one-third of the U.S. population is believed to have prehypertension, defined as systolic pressure between 120 and 139 and diastolic pressure between 80 and 89. Normal blood pressure is a systolic reading of less than 120, and a diastolic measure of less than 80. In general, the studies revealed that slightly elevated blood pressure was linked with a 50% higher risk for stroke compared with people with normal blood pressure, even after controlling for variables such as obesity, diabetes, smoking and age. In the seven studies that divided slightly high blood pressure into a low range (systolic pressure between 120 and 129 and diastolic pressure between 80 and 84)
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NEWS
September 1, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The humble potato, much maligned lately, might have shot at redemption. A study finds that purple spuds might help obese and overweight people lower their blood pressure. The small crossover study, presented recently at the national meeting and exposition of the American Chemical Society in Denver, focused on 18 overweight or obese people who had high blood pressure.  They ate six to eight small microwaved purple potatoes with skins (or biscuits containing an corresponding amount of potato starch)
HEALTH
August 29, 2011 | By Daniela Hernandez, Los Angeles Times
Rob Evans, a 61-year-old social worker from Apache Junction, Ariz., got the good news on Father's Day: After 31/2 years, doctors had found him a heart and were preparing to bring it to UCLA, where he was being treated for a slow, steady decay of his cardiac muscle. Evans had been hospitalized at UCLA for six weeks. Excited, hopeful and anxious all at once, Evans dared imagine a different life: out in the garage remodeling his '69 Nova, riding his horse, wrestling with his grandson and helping his wife, Gail, take care of their barn instead of sitting, exhausted, in his chair all day. FOR THE RECORD: Doctor's name: An earlier version of this article misspelled the first name of Dr. Bartley Griffith, the director of heart and lung transplantation at the University of Maryland in Baltimore, as Bartely.
NEWS
July 18, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Strike another blow for refined carbs: A study released today finds that soy and milk protein supplements may be associated with lower blood pressure more than refined carbohydrate supplements. The study, published online in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Assn. , put 352 adults who were at risk for high blood pressure or who had mild hypertension on various rounds of supplements. The participants were given 40 grams of powdered soy, milk or refined complex carb supplements daily for eight weeks, and had their blood pressure taken at various intervals during the trial.
HEALTH
July 7, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
America continues to get fatter, according to a comprehensive new report on the nation's weight crisis. Statistics for 2008-2010 show that 16 states are experiencing steep increases in adult obesity, and none has seen a notable downturn in the last four years. Meanwhile, cases of Type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure that health experts have long warned would result from the nation's broadening girth and sedentary ways are becoming increasingly widespread, according to the report, titled "F as in Fat," released Thursday.
NEWS
June 3, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
A type of blood pressure-lowering medication known as angiotensin receptor blockers won’t increase a patient’s risk for cancer, the Food and Drug Administration said this week. So those taking the drugs for high blood pressure can just…relax.  Concern about the drugs' possible link to cancer risk arose last year after an analysis of several studies suggested that angiotensin receptor blockers, or ARBs, might be associated with a slightly increased risk of cancer. But the FDA’s own research found no such connection, the agency said in an announcement Thursday: “This analysis included 31 trials and approximately 156,000 patients, far more than the approximately 62,000 in the published analysis.
NEWS
May 26, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
About one in five young adults may have high blood pressure, a new study suggests, but many of them appear unaware of it. Such are the results of the latest attempt to clarify just how many far-from-elderly Americans are putting their long-term health at risk via hypertension.  Researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill analyzed blood pressure data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, called Add Health,...
NEWS
March 1, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
High blood pressure often goes hand-in-hand with heart disease. But some people with heart disease don't have hypertension. Those people, however, may still benefit from taking medications to treat high blood pressure, according to an analysis published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. Experts reviewed 25 studies that examined the use of anti-hypertensive medications and prevention of heart attacks, strokes and death in people with heart disease but who had normal blood pressure.
NEWS
February 28, 2011 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
I expect consequences from drinking lots of sugary sodas. Like: unneeded calories, possible spikes in blood sugar, slow but steady erosion of tooth enamel (if those oft-repeated science fair projects with the teeth in the plastic cup of Coke are to be believed) and caffeine jitters. But a rise in blood pressure? A study just published in the journal Hypertension argues that you might be in for that if you have a sugary-beverage habit. The finding comes from the so-called INTERMAP study, which stands for International study of Macro/Micronutrients and Blood Pressure, which kind of works as a name if you ignore words like “study” and “blood.
HEALTH
February 7, 2011 | By Bill Hillman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It was 4:05 a.m. on Oct. 29, 2009. I heard my wife, Dianne, say, "I think I'm having a heart attack. " I opened my eyes and saw her standing in the bathroom doorway. She grabbed her chest, took one step and collapsed on the bed. Two weeks earlier, a friend had e-mailed me a medical report stating that chest compressions were better than traditional CPR and that the survival rate was greatly improved because chest compressions not only massaged the heart but sent blood into the brain, thus preventing brain damage.
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