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HEALTH
May 2, 2005 | Elena Conis
Banaba is the Tagalog name for the tree dubbed "pride of India" (more scientifically known as Lagerstroemia speciosa). The purple-flowered tree grows in tropical parts of the Americas, India and the Philippines, where it's used in traditional medicine to treat diabetes. The tree's glossy leaves contain high levels of colosolic acid, a plant chemical that reputedly lowers blood sugar levels.
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BUSINESS
March 17, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Apple is reportedly working on a new app called Healthbook for its iOS mobile devices that would help users track and monitor various parts of their health. 9to5Mac's Mark Gurman , who first reported the app in January, provided more details on Healthbook on Monday, citing unnamed sources who are working on the app. Here are the main things readers need to know about Healthbook: It looks like Apple's Passbook app In terms of design, Healthbook is expected to look a lot like Passbook, one of Apple's existing apps that is used to store passes from numerous iOS apps.
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SCIENCE
June 10, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
For older patients with Type 2 diabetes, an aggressive focus on keeping high blood sugar down increases the risk of driving blood sugar too low--and with that, boosting the likelihood of developing dementia, says a new study. As if that weren't bad enough, the new research finds that dementia, in turn, increases the risk of hypoglycemic episodes. The potential result, write a pair of experts publishing in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine, is "a vicious cycle of adverse events. " The latest research is likely to reignite a long-simmering debate over how tightly to control blood-sugar levels in those with Type 2 diabetes.
SCIENCE
March 3, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Discouraging news for diabetics who are keen to ward off memory problems and keep their brains in peak condition: New research has found that using medication to aggressively drive down blood pressure or improve lipid levels does not do more than standard therapy to stem the decline in cognition that's common among such patients. In fact, aggressively lowering systolic blood pressure may accelerate brain shrinkage, which is a hallmark of dementia, the new study found. The findings , published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine, emerge from a large and long-running clinical trial aimed at figuring out what measures might improve the health prospects of people at highest risk of cardiovascular disease.
NEWS
September 21, 2010
What can doctors and patients do to reduce the risk of developing serious infections after surgery? It surely can’t hurt to make sure the operating room is spic and span. Requiring physicians, nurses and medical technicians to wash their hands before treating post-operative patients probably isn’t a bad idea either. But a study published in Tuesday’s edition of Archives of General Surgery suggests another measure: Carefully control the patient’s blood sugar after surgery.
NEWS
October 23, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
People with elevated blood sugar levels - even those not high enough for diabetes or pre-diabetes - are more likely to have memory problems than people with lower levels, a study of 141 people has shown. The results suggest that people within the normal range could help prevent cognitive problems as they age by lowering their blood sugar levels, said the author of the study, Agnes Floel of Charite University Medicine in Berlin. The work was published online Wednesday in the journal Neurology.
NEWS
May 3, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Exercise is beneficial for diabetics, but some questions remain -- how much exercise is needed, and what kind? A study finds that structured exercise programs lasting 150 minutes or more a week may be best for those with type 2 diabetes. The meta-analysis released Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. examined 47 randomized clinical trials that included 8,538 patients and lasted at least 12 weeks. Of those studies, 23 focused on structured exercise training and 24 looked at physical activity advice, and all assessed how much the programs lowered hemoglobin A1c levels, a test used to evaluate blood sugar control over several months.
NEWS
February 27, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A Food and Drug Administration advisory panel recommended approval of a new wearable monitor to measure the blood sugar levels of diabetics, most of whom do not have their disease under control. While backing MiniMed Inc.'s Continuous Glucose Monitoring System, which can take up to 288 measurements every 24 hours, the panel said more study is needed on how it works in some types of diabetics and some ethnic groups.
HEALTH
September 27, 2004 | Linda Marsa, Special to The Times
Now diabetics have one more reason to keep their blood sugar tightly controlled: Excessive blood sugar contributes to heart disease. Researchers already knew that diabetes doubles the risk of heart disease -- 70% to 80% of diabetics die from heart attacks, strokes and coronary artery disease -- but they were unsure whether glucose was a culprit or if other risk factors, such as cholesterol or high blood pressure, were to blame.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Medical device maker Medtronic Inc. said Thursday that U.S. regulators had approved a system for diabetics that continually monitors blood-sugar levels and recommends insulin doses to control them. The device, approved by the Food and Drug Administration, relays blood-glucose readings every five minutes from a sensor inserted under the skin to a pager-size pump, the Minneapolis-based company said.
BUSINESS
January 16, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Google is searching for a better way for millions of diabetics to manage their disease by developing a contact lens that monitors glucose levels in tears. The contact lenses are the latest project from Google's secretive X lab that also came up with the driverless car, the Internet-connected eyewear Glass, and Project Loon, which is using balloons to bring the Internet to far-flung places. The "smart" contact lens uses a tiny wireless chip and miniature glucose sensor that is folded into two layers of soft contact lens material.
NEWS
October 23, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
People with elevated blood sugar levels - even those not high enough for diabetes or pre-diabetes - are more likely to have memory problems than people with lower levels, a study of 141 people has shown. The results suggest that people within the normal range could help prevent cognitive problems as they age by lowering their blood sugar levels, said the author of the study, Agnes Floel of Charite University Medicine in Berlin. The work was published online Wednesday in the journal Neurology.
SCIENCE
June 27, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Tucking into a breakfast of buttermilk pancakes and maple syrup, or a great bowl of white pasta for lunch, not only sends your blood sugar soaring--and then, suddenly, plummeting. Four hours after you've put down your fork, such a meal makes you hungrier than if you'd eaten one with more protein and fiber and fewer carbohydrates, a new study finds. The study also demonstrates that four hours later, the echo of that meal activates regions of the brain associated with craving and reward seeking more powerfully than does a meal with a lower "glycemic load.
SCIENCE
June 10, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
For older patients with Type 2 diabetes, an aggressive focus on keeping high blood sugar down increases the risk of driving blood sugar too low--and with that, boosting the likelihood of developing dementia, says a new study. As if that weren't bad enough, the new research finds that dementia, in turn, increases the risk of hypoglycemic episodes. The potential result, write a pair of experts publishing in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine, is "a vicious cycle of adverse events. " The latest research is likely to reignite a long-simmering debate over how tightly to control blood-sugar levels in those with Type 2 diabetes.
HEALTH
February 2, 2013 | By Rene Lynch, Los Angeles Times
You've heard about the "Wheat Belly" diet, right? Well, technically, it doesn't exist. Dr. William Davis points out that the word "diet" does not appear on either the cover of his bestselling "Wheat Belly" book published in 2011 or on the follow-up, "Wheat Belly Cookbook," which was published last month and already tops bestseller lists. And that omission is intentional, Davis said. "Wheat Belly" is about stripping your plate of a substance that contributes to heart disease, causes joint pain, inflammation, foggy thinking, bloating and much more, Davis said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2013 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
One by one, the diabetic patients reluctantly stepped on the scale in the basement of a South Los Angeles clinic. Nearby, a nurse scribbled numbers on a chart. Camara January, 31, her round face framed by a sparkly headband, held her breath. The number stopped at 245 pounds. "That's not good," January said. Tracy Donald, 45, stepped up. Just under 240 pounds. "That is wrong," she said. Ramon Marquez, 62, tall and clean-shaven, methodically took off his watch, his cap and his shoes.
HEALTH
May 7, 2007 | From Times wire reports
Tightly controlling the blood sugar levels of diabetics, even with the attendant risk of dangerously low levels of blood glucose, does not damage mental abilities, researchers have found. Patients did not suffer in tests of intelligence, memory, coordination, language and other mental abilities, they reported in the May 3 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. "It certainly helps decrease a worry that I get asked about a lot," Dr.
HEALTH
November 12, 2001 | THOMAS H. MAUGH, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Actively treating patients who develop high levels of blood sugar during recuperation from surgery can ease complications and improve survival, according to a new study. Non-diabetic patients who undergo surgery often develop diabetes symptoms during their immediate recovery, but physicians have never been quite sure how aggressively to treat them. A new Belgian study suggests that prompt treatment of the symptoms can cause dramatic improvements in the patients' health and recovery. Dr.
HEALTH
October 6, 2012 | By Amber Dance
The digital doctor will see you now. Just pull out your smartphone. Want to track your blood pressure? Make checking your pulse as easy as saying "cheese"? Figure out your eyeglasses prescription or diagnose an ear infection? "The smartphone is effectively becoming a scientific instrument," says Frank Moss of the MIT Media Lab. With modern high-resolution screens and powerful computing ability, the smartphone can perform tests that previously required a doctor's visit. And more cheaply.
SCIENCE
June 12, 2012 | By Jon Bardin, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
For Terra Hillyer, who has Type 1 diabetes, enrolling in a clinical trial for a new medical device called the artificial pancreas provided a glimpse of what life might be like without the constant checks of blood sugar levels and infusions of insulin that currently mark her days. “The first thing I do when I wake up is check my blood sugar,” Hillyer says. “It is the background noise of my life.” Except for one day recently, when the mother of two checked into the Sansum Diabetes Research Institute in Santa Barbara.
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