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Blood Transfusions

NEWS
February 10, 2002 | From Associated Press
A Texas ranch hand undergoing surgery was infected with HIV in what is believed to be the first U.S. case of the virus being transmitted through donated blood since rigorous new screening technology was implemented three years ago. A spokeswoman for the South Texas Blood and Tissue Center said only one patient received the tainted blood.
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HEALTH
October 29, 2001 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Elderly heart attack patients who are anemic should be given blood transfusions as soon as possible as part of their therapy, Yale University researchers said, adding that thousands of lives might be saved if such a recommendation were widely followed in the United States. Physicians have not done this in the past, experts said, because there was little evidence to support its efficacy.
NEWS
May 31, 2001 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They came here looking for treatment, they said, some way to get better, feel stronger. But they also came to talk about the scourge that has turned their lives into burdens, children into orphans and their village into what one doctor calls a "combat zone." The scourge is AIDS. And it is laying waste to small pockets of China's most populous province, Henan, among poor farmers who knew little or nothing about the disease when they were first infected through tainted blood.
HEALTH
April 9, 2001 | JONATHAN FIELDING and VALERIE ULENE
Nearly 20,000 Americans receive organ transplants each year, and their dramatic stories are regularly featured on television and in newspapers and magazines. Little attention is paid, however, to another form of human tissue donation: blood transfusion. Every year, about 4.5 million American men, women and children receive transfusions of blood or blood components that are required to save their lives or maintain their health.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2000 | Associated Press
The Jehovah's Witnesses will continue to reject members who defy the group's prohibition on most blood transfusions, an official said. Spokesman James Pellechia dismissed news reports that the long-standing policy had been reversed as being misleading. The group acknowledges that it has ended its practice of excommunicating members who receive blood transfusions. But Pellechia said that a Jehovah's Witness who has a transfusion automatically "revokes his membership."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2000
Transplants of umbilical cord blood are as effective as bone marrow transplants in saving the lives of childhood leukemia victims and others whose ravaged immune systems must be restored, an international team of researchers reports in today's New England Journal of Medicine. Umbilical cord blood appears more likely than marrow to work when the donor and the recipient are unrelated, according to the team from the University of Wisconsin and the Paris-based Eurocord-Cord Blood Transplant Group.
HEALTH
September 13, 1999 | JANE E. ALLEN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Imagine that your daughter is about to have her tonsils removed. Everything's arranged, right down to your family leave and her school makeup tests, but then the hospital calls and says all elective surgery is being postponed because there isn't enough blood if an emergency transfusion is needed. Fiction? Or prediction?
NEWS
March 28, 1999 | JANET McCONNAUGHEY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The discovery that it is safe--and sometimes better--to cut back on blood transfusions for critically ill patients may have effects far beyond the obvious ones of blood and money. It could open the way for more studies of whether common sense makes medical sense, said Dr. Gordon R. Barnard, chief of critical care service at Vanderbilt Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn. Common sense would say that a normal red-cell count is better than a low one, but the work directed by Dr. Paul C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1999
A judge delayed sentencing until March 12 for an Azusa man convicted in the death of a Jehovah's Witness member who refused a blood transfusion on religious grounds after she was hit by the drunk driver's truck. An attorney for Keith Cook, 32, persuaded the judge to delay sentencing to allow a probation department report to be completed that may be considered in sentencing. Pomona Superior Court Judge Reginald Yates also rejected a motion for a new trial by Cook's attorney.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1999
With only a few exceptions, transfusions should not be given to critically ill patients--especially relatively young ones--until they are severely anemic, Canadian researchers report in today's New England Journal of Medicine. For reasons that are not yet clear, giving blood to patients who are only mildly anemic makes them more likely to die, the researchers found. The exceptions are patients who are bleeding or suffering from heart attacks, cardiovascular disease or emphysema.
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