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Blood Transfusions

NEWS
December 20, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Federal advisors said the U.S. should consider barring blood donations from people who lived in or visited Britain because of concerns about mad cow disease. The worry is that these people may have eaten meat or meat products infected with mad cow disease and could be at risk for getting and transmitting new variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, or CJD, Food and Drug Administration advisors said. The FDA will now decide whether to direct blood banks to follow the panel's advice.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1998 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Pomona Superior Court jury convicted drunk driver Keith Cook on Friday in the death of Jadine Russell, rejecting the Azusa auto mechanic's claim that his victim caused her own demise when she declined a blood transfusion for religious reasons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1998
Following emotional closing arguments by a prosecutor and defense attorney Tuesday, jurors in Pomona Superior Court began deliberating whether alleged drunk driver Keith Cook killed Jadine Russell, or the Azusa woman caused her own death by refusing a blood transfusion. The jury must decide whether Cook, an auto mechanic, was guilty of second-degree murder for driving drunk and ramming into Russell's car on a dark, two-lane road.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1998 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Drunk driver Keith Cook killed Jadine Russell with his speeding truck as surely as if he had gunned her down--and neither the Azusa woman's beliefs as a Jehovah's Witness nor her refusal to take a blood transfusion should save Cook from a murder conviction, a prosecutor told a Pomona Superior Court jury Monday. Deputy Dist. Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1998 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Superior Court judge in Pomona told jurors that they should expect to begin deliberating prickly issues of medicine, religion and the law Monday in the death of a Jehovah's Witness who refused blood transfusions after being hit by a drunk driver and died.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1998 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It would be "ridiculous" to suggest that a devout Jehovah's Witness died solely because she declined a blood transfusion and not because of injuries sustained when she was run over by an alleged drunk driver, a medical expert testified Friday in the vehicular murder trial of Keith Cook. The testimony of Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1998 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A fascinating convergence of religion and the law brought the media in force to a Pomona courtroom Thursday, where a jury must decide if a suspected drunk driver killed Jadine Russell, or her refusal of a blood transfusion did. As the vehicular murder trial of Keith Cook entered its second day, his attorney tried to show that Cook was not as drunk nor driving as fast as the prosecution suggests; and thus was not murderous when his truck plowed into Russell's car March 7.
NEWS
December 3, 1998 | ANN W. O'NEILL and JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Chance, religion and the law collided with life-or-death consequences on a dark stretch of Sierra Madre Avenue in Azusa in March, when a suspected drunk driver hit a disabled car that plowed into four people standing on the roadside. Most seriously injured was Jadine Russell, a 55-year-old mother of five and a devout Jehovah's Witness who died hours later, after refusing a blood transfusion that might have saved her life. "No blood!"
NEWS
March 6, 1998 | From Associated Press
Hundreds of thousands of Americans who had blood transfusions years ago will receive letters warning that they may have been infected with hepatitis C, a serious liver disease that often shows no symptoms for years. "We know that many Americans infected with hepatitis C are unaware they have the disease," Surgeon General David Satcher told a House subcommittee Thursday.
NEWS
September 19, 1997 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Routine blood transfusions for children with sickle cell anemia who are at high risk for stroke can dramatically reduce the chances of a stroke occurring, federal health officials announced Thursday. "Although this is not a cure, transfusion offers these children the hope of avoiding the devastating consequences of stroke," said Dr. Claude Lenfant, director of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, which released the new findings during a national conference here on sickle cell disease.
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