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OPINION
January 27, 2004 | Robert Scheer, Robert Scheer writes a weekly column for The Times and is co-author of "The Five Biggest Lies Bush Told Us About Iraq" (Seven Stories Press/Akashic Books, 2003).
Now, can we talk of impeachment? The rueful admission by former chief U.S. weapons inspector David Kay that Saddam Hussein did not possess weapons of mass destruction or the means to create them at the time of the U.S. invasion confirms the fact that the Bush administration is complicit in arguably the greatest scandal in U.S. history.
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NEWS
September 22, 2013 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
Blue is shaping up to be the cool hue on the Emmys red carpet tonight. "New Girl" actress Zooey Deschanel is wearing an icy blue strapless column gown with a decorative fold at the hip by J. Mendel, and geometric black-and-white nail art by Redcarpetman, which she shared via Instagram.  I like this look, which is sweet but sleek. "Game of Thrones' " Emilia Clarke is in a one-of-a-kind "chalk blue" three-ply silk georgette gown by Donna Karan Atelier, with all-over hand-cut and folded geometric leaves and a polished silver metal belt.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1994 | SEAN MITCHELL, Sean Mitchell is an occasional contributor to Calendar. and
When someone from a movie company says they're going to show you Los Angeles on the screen as you've never seen it before, the chance that this statement will turn out to be not entirely true is a distinct possibility. The filmmakers at the helm of the forthcoming TriStar movie "Devil in a Blue Dress" are now repeating those very words, but on the face of it, they seem to have more to promise than most. Adapted from the 1990 Walter Mosley mystery novel of the same title and starring Denzel Washington and Jennifer Beals, "Devil in a Blue Dress" will show a side of the city that has not been much photographed by Hollywood: specifically, the black neighborhoods of Los Angeles just after World War II. The film, which has just finished shooting on locations around the city, is drawn from a story cast in the mold of film noir, but it is film noir peopled largely by working-class African Americans who in 1948, it will be remembered, were still living on the far side of the civil rights movement.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2013 | By Nardine Saad
Toni Braxton's wardrobe malfunction surely had some fans over the moon. The 45-year-old songstress inadvertently exposed her backside to an entire arena of concert-goers while she was performing last week in New Brunswick, N.J. As she was dancing, the singer turned around to fix her slinky, sparkly blue dress without realizing that she had mooned the entire crowd, according to the NSFW video footage  obtained by TMZ, which is also readily...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1997
Regarding "Devil in a Blue Dress" (Letters, Sept. 21): As capable as Carl Franklin is as a director, his film stumbled badly because it was saddled with a subpar script pure and simple. This is why the film never had a chance and failed at the box office. The failure of "Devil in a Blue Dress" had far more to do with its artistic shortcomings than it did with a failed studio marketing effort. SAM WATTERS Los Angeles
BOOKS
June 12, 1994
I agree almost entirely with Walter Mosley's article "A Closed Book" (May 29). The publishing industry may talk a good multicultural game, but it still doesn't hire people of color. It's not what was written that is amazing as much as having it printed. Being in the movie industry for some 20 years and more, those same principles Mr. Mosley pointed out in the publishing business, applies to the motion picture and TV industry as well. The question for Mr. Mosley: What is the ethnic makeup of crew members above and below the line in decision making positions on the set of the film being made from his novel, "Devil in a Blue Dress?"
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1997
Re James Ellroy's concern that "noir" pieces like "Mulholland Falls" and "Devil in a Blue Dress" were the commercial failures that might doom "L.A. Confidential" ("L.A. Beyond Your Wildest Nightmare," by John Milward, Sept. 7). "Mulholland Falls" failed from lack of creative marketing, plain and simple. But the failure of "Devil in a Blue Dress" stemmed from two issues, both unrelated to "L.A. Confidential." First, it was an African American-themed film the studio did not know how to market.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1994
As someone who has been writing about historic Central Avenue for the past dozen years, I'm surprised to read how inaccessible it was for the production designer of "Devil in a Blue Dress," the new Easy Rawlins film ("The 'Devil' Is in the Details," by Sean Mitchell, June 26). While I was researching my two books and one detective novel touching on the subject (all published within the past several years), not to mention numerous articles and two dozen R&B reissue album notes, I found enough photos, old news items and personal recollections to bring Central Avenue very much alive for me. Two other recent chroniclers--Tom Reed and Johnny Otis--also brought "the Stem" into clear focus in their books.
OPINION
February 21, 1999 | Ilene Beckerman, Ilene Beckerman is the author of "Love, Loss and What I Wore" and "What We Do for Love"
Quite frankly, I was a bit let down by the basic black and pearls that Monica S. Lewinsky wore at her deposition. It was politically correct--but boring. Everybody knows Lewinsky was the real star of the Starr report, and stars should shine. High fashion is more interesting than high crimes, anyway. It's too bad Linda R. Tripp isn't still advising Lewinsky on what to wear. But then again, Tripp's advice didn't really turn out so well. Monica definitely needs help.
NEWS
December 26, 2000 | MARY ROURKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Rabbi Sherre Zwelling Hirsch walked down the aisle last summer, dressed in her beaded white wedding gown, she passed her mother, Barbara, wearing a shimmery blue dress. She could not have imagined what lay ahead for her, her mother and their dresses. Today, four months after that first wedding, a second wedding will take place. The proposal that led to the second wedding was made at the first. Hirsch's mother, Barbara Zwelling, is getting married at 4 o'clock at a Beverly Hills hotel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2005 | Jocelyn Y. Stewart, Times Staff Writer
When you grow up the way Regina Louise grew up -- abandoned by her parents, physically abused by caretakers, shuttled from foster home to foster home -- you learn to doubt your memories. Even the good ones, especially the good ones, come with a disclaimer: Maybe they never happened. Louise remembered that a woman once wanted to adopt her.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2005 | Carla Hall, Times Staff Writer
Dancing outside Brentwood Presbyterian Church to the hip-hop ring tone on her cellphone, Sharday McCoy, 17, waited Saturday for her number to be called so she could begin that rite of spring: the hunt for a prom dress. "I'll know it when I see it," said the Inglewood High School senior, who has been in foster care since she was 5. The only thing she knew for certain about the dress was that it would be free.
OPINION
January 27, 2004 | Robert Scheer, Robert Scheer writes a weekly column for The Times and is co-author of "The Five Biggest Lies Bush Told Us About Iraq" (Seven Stories Press/Akashic Books, 2003).
Now, can we talk of impeachment? The rueful admission by former chief U.S. weapons inspector David Kay that Saddam Hussein did not possess weapons of mass destruction or the means to create them at the time of the U.S. invasion confirms the fact that the Bush administration is complicit in arguably the greatest scandal in U.S. history.
NEWS
March 24, 2002 | MARY McNAMARA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few weeks ago I was asked a question: "Would you like to cover the Oscars this year?" What I heard was: "Is it physically possible for you to look gorgeous for even one night?" I said yes. How could I say no? Normal women are rarely required to look gorgeous. For the occasional New Year's Eve party or work-related bash, it is perhaps something to aspire to, and on their wedding days, most women would prefer to hear they look "gorgeous" rather than "pretty" or, God forbid, "fine."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2001 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA, TIMES FASHION WRITER
Their marching orders were to dress down, and like well-directed actors in a post-Sept. 11 world, celebrities took the red carpet from its usual spectacle to respectable. The mood at Sunday night's Emmy Awards was subdued, and so was the dress, almost funereal with the dominance of black. Bright, in-your-face color--except for a purple pantsuit here, a blue dress there--was absent.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2001 | HUGH HART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Don't diss Neil Diamond when you're in the room with Meg Howrey. Howrey got her start in show biz thanks to his music. At age 4, this small-town girl ran around the house in Danville, Ill., acting out "Holly Holy" and other Diamond gems. Howrey's still dancing with the full-throttle glee of a child, only this time the storytelling takes place on the stage of the Ahmanson Theatre, where she appears in the Tony-winning musical "Contact." And no, Howrey's not the Girl in the Yellow Dress.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2001 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA, TIMES FASHION WRITER
Their marching orders were to dress down, and like well-directed actors in a post-Sept. 11 world, celebrities took the red carpet from its usual spectacle to respectable. The mood at Sunday night's Emmy Awards was subdued, and so was the dress, almost funereal with the dominance of black. Bright, in-your-face color--except for a purple pantsuit here, a blue dress there--was absent.
NEWS
June 20, 1990 | From United Press International
A North Korean woman who placed a time bomb on a Korean Air jetliner in 1987 that disappeared with 115 people aboard said today she still feels guilty and punishes herself by not buying all the dresses she wants. Kim Hyon Hui, 28, convicted of the atrocity and given a death sentence that was later commuted, met with reporters at a Seoul hotel, looking healthy and well-heeled in a blue dress. "As a woman, as a human being, I have the same desires as others," Kim said in a soft voice.
NEWS
December 26, 2000 | MARY ROURKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Rabbi Sherre Zwelling Hirsch walked down the aisle last summer, dressed in her beaded white wedding gown, she passed her mother, Barbara, wearing a shimmery blue dress. She could not have imagined what lay ahead for her, her mother and their dresses. Today, four months after that first wedding, a second wedding will take place. The proposal that led to the second wedding was made at the first. Hirsch's mother, Barbara Zwelling, is getting married at 4 o'clock at a Beverly Hills hotel.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1999 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two of contemporary cinema's most successful minority directors, Robert Rodriguez and Carl Franklin, offer fascinating insights into their craft in Columbia TriStar's DVDs of their most popular films. Latino director Rodriguez burst into the public's consciousness in 1992 with his Spanish-language action-comedy "El Mariachi," which he made for a mere $7,000. Three years later, Columbia gave him $7 million to make the dashing, violent sequel, "Desperado," which stars Antonio Banderas.
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