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ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Chris Barton
It's no secret that the music industry loves its anniversaries. From commemorating a certain Liverpool band's first appearance on U.S. television to the release of Eric Dolphy's squirrelly, spacious masterpiece "Out to Lunch," this year has already seen a few big ones. Near the top of that list has to be the 75th anniversary of storied jazz label Blue Note Records. In addition to a recent New York City concert featuring label stars Jason Moran and Robert Glasper , the label will also be celebrated with an exhibition opening March 25 at the Grammy Museum, "Blue Note Records: The Finest in Jazz," which will feature artwork, photographs and more music artifacts.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Chris Barton
It's no secret that the music industry loves its anniversaries. From commemorating a certain Liverpool band's first appearance on U.S. television to the release of Eric Dolphy's squirrelly, spacious masterpiece "Out to Lunch," this year has already seen a few big ones. Near the top of that list has to be the 75th anniversary of storied jazz label Blue Note Records. In addition to a recent New York City concert featuring label stars Jason Moran and Robert Glasper , the label will also be celebrated with an exhibition opening March 25 at the Grammy Museum, "Blue Note Records: The Finest in Jazz," which will feature artwork, photographs and more music artifacts.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2009 | Chris Barton
At this year's "Grammy Salute to Jazz," there was a lot of talk about the future. Inside the crisp, modern Club Nokia at the L.A. Live complex downtown Tuesday night, performers and presenters such as Herbie Hancock, Natalie Cole and Recording Academy President Neil Portnow all gestured at the fresh faces of the high-school-aged Grammy Jazz Ensembles program filling the bandstand and assured an audience of elegantly dressed fans that jazz's future is indeed in good hands.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2009 | Chris Barton
At this year's "Grammy Salute to Jazz," there was a lot of talk about the future. Inside the crisp, modern Club Nokia at the L.A. Live complex downtown Tuesday night, performers and presenters such as Herbie Hancock, Natalie Cole and Recording Academy President Neil Portnow all gestured at the fresh faces of the high-school-aged Grammy Jazz Ensembles program filling the bandstand and assured an audience of elegantly dressed fans that jazz's future is indeed in good hands.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2002
Two important jazz books that Don Heckman failed to note (Jazz Spotlight, Jan. 6): a history of the Blue Note label by U.K. author Richard Cook titled "Blue Note Records--The Biography" (Secker & Warburg, London, 2001); and the long-anticipated biography of Chet Baker by New York author James Gavin, "Deep in a Dream," due in April from Random House. JAMES A. HARROD Laguna Beach
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Blue Note Records, home to recordings by classic jazz artists such as Miles Davis, Thelonious Monk, Art Blakey and Chet Baker, has begun releasing select cuts from its trove of recordings for use on mobile phones. The move is part of an initiative by the label, a unit of Britain's EMI Music, called "The Best of Blue Tones," and marks the first time samples culled from the master recordings have been available for customizing mobile phone sounds.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 1989 | ZAN STEWART
Jimmy Smith saved the best for last at the Mild Seven Lights 50th Anniversary Blue Note Celebration, held on a very sunny Sunday at the John Anson Ford Theatre in Hollywood. Smith, who first recorded his bluesy, at times campy, style for the noted label in the early '50s, provided the audience with the kind of straightforward, blues-drenched numbers that Blue Note was renowned for.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1989 | LEONARD FEATHER
Starting a little late (the promoters were no doubt waiting for a larger crowd that failed to show), the first of three concerts in KLON-FM's celebration of the Blue Note Records semicentennial got under way at the John Anson Ford Theatre on Sunday afternoon beneath a blazing sun.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1997 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Blue Note Records was one of the most important jazz record labels of the 1940s, '50s and '60s. The company's roster of artists included--with a number of key exceptions (Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie among them)--many of the most influential jazz players to emerge in the post-World War II years. That the hundreds of now-classic Blue Note albums were largely the product of the musical tastes of Alfred Lion, the company's founder, is remarkable testimony to one man's musical vision.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1997 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Blue Note Records is making an important move into Cuban jazz. Although the still-difficult political climate between the United States and the island nation makes it impossible to acquire Cuban acts directly, the company's EMI Canada affiliate has signed legendary pianist-composer-bandleader Jesus "Chucho" Valdes and his equally renowned band, Irakere, to a recording contract.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2009 | Chris Barton
From an artistic perspective, tribute concerts can be a dicey thing. By nature what they celebrate is past achievements, something a bit at odds with a genre that's as theoretically committed to evolution and forward-thinking improvisation as jazz. But if ever there was a label that deserved whatever kind of party it wants, it's 70-year-old Blue Note Records.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Blue Note Records, home to recordings by classic jazz artists such as Miles Davis, Thelonious Monk, Art Blakey and Chet Baker, has begun releasing select cuts from its trove of recordings for use on mobile phones. The move is part of an initiative by the label, a unit of Britain's EMI Music, called "The Best of Blue Tones," and marks the first time samples culled from the master recordings have been available for customizing mobile phone sounds.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2004 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
A seismic shift takes place in the jazz world in March, when Wynton Marsalis -- perhaps the most visible living jazz artist in the world -- releases his first CD on the Blue Note label. After 20 years at Columbia Records, Marsalis is moving from a large label to a smaller label, from a multi-genre, primarily pop-oriented company to one of jazz's legendary imprints. Why leave a company that has released two dozen Marsalis albums over the last two decades?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2002
Two important jazz books that Don Heckman failed to note (Jazz Spotlight, Jan. 6): a history of the Blue Note label by U.K. author Richard Cook titled "Blue Note Records--The Biography" (Secker & Warburg, London, 2001); and the long-anticipated biography of Chet Baker by New York author James Gavin, "Deep in a Dream," due in April from Random House. JAMES A. HARROD Laguna Beach
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, Don Heckman is The Times' jazz writer
Horace Silver still has such a youthful look and such a playful manner that it's hard to believe that the pianist-composer will be 71 on Sept. 2. Equally remarkable is his tenure as a major jazz figure for five decades, virtually since his first appearance on the scene in 1950 as a member of Stan Getz's rhythm section, and that he continues to produce eminently appealing jazz.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, Don Heckman is The Times' jazz writer
With the neoclassic fascination--in some cases obsession--with jazz of the '40s and '50s beginning to wane, emerging young artists of the late '90s are finally beginning to seek their own pathways. And, lacking the presence of a major influential voice such as a John Coltrane or a Miles Davis, they are moving forward in an intrepid array of musical quests. At 31, with several albums already under his belt, Charlie Hunter is not exactly a new arrival.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 1989 | LEONARD FEATHER
Blue Note Records is undoubtedly the oldest continuously active jazz company in the world and is not in the least shy about admitting it. In fact, it is being shouted from the rooftops of New York to a mountaintop in Japan. To celebrate its 50th anniversary, a whole season of concerts was lined up featuring past and present associates of the label.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2009 | Chris Barton
From an artistic perspective, tribute concerts can be a dicey thing. By nature what they celebrate is past achievements, something a bit at odds with a genre that's as theoretically committed to evolution and forward-thinking improvisation as jazz. But if ever there was a label that deserved whatever kind of party it wants, it's 70-year-old Blue Note Records.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1998 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bruce Lundvall, the president of Blue Note and Metro Blue Records, has been a jazz fan since he first started collecting Lionel Hampton discs when he was 10 years old. "If I weren't doing what I'm doing," he says, "I'd be a failed saxophone player." But it took Lundvall, 62, a while to get to the point where he could completely focus on the music he loves best.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1997 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Blue Note Records is making an important move into Cuban jazz. Although the still-difficult political climate between the United States and the island nation makes it impossible to acquire Cuban acts directly, the company's EMI Canada affiliate has signed legendary pianist-composer-bandleader Jesus "Chucho" Valdes and his equally renowned band, Irakere, to a recording contract.
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