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NEWS
October 21, 2003 | David Lukas
[ BALAENOPTERA MUSCULUS ] It was someone's small joke to give the planet's largest organism the scientific name "musculus," meaning little mouse. Perhaps no other word could convey the immense proportions of an animal that grows to more than 100 feet -- longer than a jumbo jet, with a heart the size of a Hyundai -- and that requires up to four tons of food per day.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014
An in-demand bassist who studied under Charlie Haden and has performed with a rich roster of talents that includes Ani DiFranco, Andrew Bird, Nels Cline and Scott Amendola, Todd Sickafoose's knotted and lovely 2008 album, "Tiny Resistors," was one of the top jazz releases of that year. Finally at the cusp of delivering an encore, Sickafoose reunites an all-star band that includes violinist Jenny Scheinman, clarinetist Ben Goldberg and drummer Allison Miller to premiere a piece dubbed "Bear Proof," a work commissioned by Chamber Music America.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2002 | Betty Martens, Special to The Times
"I see a blue whale in the sky too, Jeremy. Want me to tell you about what I see?" "Like a game, Dad?" "That's right, Jeremy. My whale is about as long as several buses lined up end to end. And it would take you awhile to walk around it." "How could I walk around it in the sky?" Jeremy asked with a frown. "But remember you said everything was upside-down today," Dad reminded him. "Here's another hint. One of the earliest ones seen was as long as two football fields. Imagine that."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
The National Marine Fisheries Service violated federal law when it authorized the Navy's use of sonar in training exercises off Hawaii and California through 2018, an environmental group said in a lawsuit filed Monday. The agency's own analysis had determined the war games would result in 155 marine mammal deaths, more than 2,000 permanent injuries and about 9.6 million instances of temporary hearing loss and disruptions of vital behaviors - an 1,100% increase over the previous five-year period, according to the Natural Resources Defense Council.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2010 | By Jill Leovy
Blue whales have changed their songs. It's the same old tune, but the pitch of the blues is mysteriously lower -- especially off the coast of California where, local researchers say, the whales' voices have dropped by more than half an octave since the 1960s. No one knows why. But one conjecture is that more baritone whales indicate healthier populations: The whales may be less shrill because they're less scarce and don't have to pipe up to be heard by neighbors. The discovery was accidental.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2010 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
Unusually large numbers of blue whales dining off the Southern California coast are providing marine mammal enthusiasts a rare opportunity to see Earth's largest creatures lolling in the waves and spouting misty plumes. On Thursday, 77 amateur whale watchers on an excursion boat operated by the Aquarium of the Pacific and Harbor Breeze Cruises in Long Beach spotted six blue whales and two fin whales in less than three hours. "Dead ahead!" a woman yelled as a massive blue whale emerged under a spout 15 feet high and then arced slowly back into the water.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2011 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
The waters near the nation's largest port complex have become a bustling feeding ground for increasing numbers of blue whales, putting the endangered animals at greater risk of being hit and killed by the enormous ships moving in and out of the harbor, according to researchers who've been tracking them for nearly two years. The whales, which migrate along the coast of California and are regularly spotted from May to December, are congregating in such numbers in the midst of this virtual freeway of ship traffic that the spot has become "the area of densest concentration close to shore in all of California," said research scientist John Calambokidis.
SCIENCE
July 31, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Federal scientists have sighted a rare mammal in Alaska waters: the endangered blue whale. Sightings by researchers on board a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration vessel means the blue whale population may be getting healthier and expanding back to traditional territories. "It's been 30 years since we had a confirmed sighting up here," Jay Barlow, chief scientist on board the McArthur II, said Friday from Kodiak. Most recent estimates show about 12,000 blue whales worldwide.
SPORTS
August 14, 1996 | PETE THOMAS
The Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary sent a necropsy team to San Miguel Island on Tuesday to try to determine what caused the death of an adult blue whale that was discovered washed up on the beach on Monday. Since whales rarely wash up on beaches after dying, and because there is a worldwide moratorium on hunting blue whales commercially, this discovery presents a rare opportunity for scientific study.
SPORTS
August 11, 2000 | PETE THOMAS
Nature question: What has a tongue as big as an African elephant? Answer: an adult blue whale, whose tongue can weigh as much as six tons. We're telling you this because an estimated 50 to 60 blue whales recently have taken up residence off the north end of Santa Rosa Island. The Condor out of Santa Barbara's Sea Landing has been making daily runs to the area, enabling passengers a crow's-nest view of the largest creature to inhabit our planet.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013
A musical partnership that reaches back 20 years, the meeting of drummer Scott Amendola with seven-string guitarist Charlie Hunter has yielded a wealth of memorable recordings, including Hunter's album-length cover of Bob Marley's "Natty Dread" and 2012's sparkling duet, "Not Getting Behind Is the New Getting Ahead. " Here the two reconvene in support of the groove-heavy "Pucker," a new duet album featuring Amendola as lead songwriter. The Blue Whale, 123 Astronaut E S Onizuka Suite 301, Los Angeles.
SCIENCE
September 18, 2013 | By Amina Khan, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
Scientists probing a giant plug of earwax pulled from a dead blue whale have discovered in its hardened layers a detailed biography of the wild animal's life, from birth to death, in 6-month chapters.  Their new technique, described in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, arms researchers with a tool to understand a whale's hormonal and chemical biography --  and a window into how pollutants, some long discontinued, still pervade...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2013
Vocalist Gretchen Parlato possesses a vision as rich as her voice on her 2012 album, "The Lost and Found," which found her adding her own lyrics to songs by Wayne Shorter and Ambrose Akinmusire alongside covers of Mary J. Blige's "All That I Can Say" (written by Lauryn Hill) and a surprisingly sultry reworking of that dentist-office fixture "Holding Back the Years" by Simply Red's Mick Hucknall. Here she performs in a duet with pianist Taylor Eigsti. The Blue Whale, 123 Astronaut E S Onizuka St., Suite 301. Sat., 9 p.m. $15. http://www.bluewhalemusic.com .
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2013 | By Chris Barton
Los Angeles can be tough on newcomers, particularly among musicians. A key figure in the fertile Chicago jazz scene and member of the groundbreaking indie band Tortoise, guitarist Jeff Parker is midway through a relocation to L.A. that has found him straddling two cities during the last few months. Though Parker never wanted for gigs in a city that found him collaborating with musicians who included the late saxophonist Fred Anderson, vibraphonist Jason Adasiewicz and flutist Nicole Mitchell, Los Angeles has proved to be a bit of a challenge so far. "There's so many great musicians out here, man....
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2013
With a bright, fluid tone and a deft improvisational hand, young Israeli-born guitarist Gilad Hekselman is a rising star on the New York City jazz scene. Here he performs from his latest album, "This Just In," a primarily trio-oriented record due Tuesday that features guest turns from saxophonist Mark Turner. In the second of a two-night stand, Hekselman will be joined by local bassist Dave Robaire and drummer Mark Ferber. The Blue Whale, 123 Astronaut E S Onizuka St., Suite 301, L.A. Thu., 9 p.m. $15. http://www.bluewhalemusic.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2013
As if the weather weren't enough for Angelenos to gloat about, jazz fans got yet another reason when Ambrose Akinmusire returned to his West Coast roots as an instructor at USC's Thornton School of Music. That means more opportunities to catch a unique, restless talent, including this residency, which should hint toward his next moves following his justly celebrated Blue Note debut, "When the Heart Emerges Glistening. " The Blue Whale, 123 Astronaut E S Onizuka St. Suite 301, L.A. Fri.-Sun., 9 p.m. $15. http://www.bluewhalemusic.com.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1999
Using DNA analysis, American scientists have traced the life of a protected blue whale from its birth in the North Atlantic in 1965 to its sale as raw meat in a Japanese store nearly 30 years later. Apart from the feat of tracking the life of one of nature's most intriguing creatures, the study in today's Nature showed that the whale had been sold for profit at a time when a global moratorium should have prevented it from being killed except for scientific purposes.
NEWS
November 23, 1986 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Scientists say an "extended herd" of perhaps 30 blue whales--the largest animal on earth--is picnicking in Monterey Bay, giving researchers an unusual opportunity to study the massive and mysterious marine mammals. The whales' six-week-long feast also is said to be giving a great show to amateur whale-watchers, who brave stomach-wrenching eight-foot seas in charter boats to get a look at the 80-foot-long creatures.
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