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NEWS
March 5, 2011 | By Judi Dash, special to the Times
Bzzz, flash, screech — that’s your cellphone being left behind. Well, actually, that’s the new Zomm Wireless Leash ($99.99), a little round keychain-sized device that, when activated, uses Bluetooth technology to detect and sound an alert if you and your Bluetooth-enabled cellphone become separated by 20 to 40 feet. A built-in panic button lets you initiate a piercing alarm and auto-dials 911. Info: (888) 821-0888, Zomm
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NEWS
March 5, 2011 | By Judi Dash, special to the Times
Bzzz, flash, screech — that’s your cellphone being left behind. Well, actually, that’s the new Zomm Wireless Leash ($99.99), a little round keychain-sized device that, when activated, uses Bluetooth technology to detect and sound an alert if you and your Bluetooth-enabled cellphone become separated by 20 to 40 feet. A built-in panic button lets you initiate a piercing alarm and auto-dials 911. Info: (888) 821-0888, Zomm
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BUSINESS
February 3, 2000 | From Reuters
Qualcomm Inc. said Wednesday it agreed to jointly develop with Swedish telecom firm Ericsson a technology that makes cell phones more versatile. The announcement, seen by analysts as a step to help Qualcomm hold on to a commanding market share for so-called CDMA wireless chips, sparked solid gains in both companies' stocks.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The Bluetooth wireless standard used in cellphones and other small devices will take a leap in transmission speed, broadening its scope to enable high-definition video and files for digital music players such as the iPod. The industry group behind Bluetooth said Tuesday that it would boost transfer speeds in the next few years by incorporating a radio technology, known as ultra-wideband. Currently, Bluetooth works only for low-speed uses such as headsets and wireless keyboards.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2000 | KAREN ALEXANDER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In its biggest acquisition so far, Irvine chip maker Broadcom Corp. said Tuesday it would buy a company that develops the wireless bluetooth technology for stock worth $457.1 million. Bluetooth, a hot new arena, uses radio frequencies instead of wires or cables to let electronic devices communicate with each other and over the Internet at short ranges. Broadcom, which makes high-speed communications chips, will issue 3 million shares for the 87% of Innovent Systems Inc.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The Bluetooth wireless standard used in cellphones and other small devices will take a leap in transmission speed, broadening its scope to enable high-definition video and files for digital music players such as the iPod. The industry group behind Bluetooth said Tuesday that it would boost transfer speeds in the next few years by incorporating a radio technology, known as ultra-wideband. Currently, Bluetooth works only for low-speed uses such as headsets and wireless keyboards.
BUSINESS
January 14, 2005 | David Colker, Times Staff Writer
Verizon Wireless misled customers about the capabilities of an expensive new cellphone and disabled many of the handset's key features in order to charge higher fees for its own services, a lawsuit alleges. The suit, filed Dec. 30 in Los Angeles County Superior Court, claims the nation's second-largest mobile phone provider promoted the v710 handset made by Motorola Inc. as its only model equipped with so-called Bluetooth technology.
BUSINESS
October 28, 2002 | Ron Harris, Associated Press
Palm Inc. is expected to introduce two new hand-held computer models today, each aimed at getting into the hands of tech-savvy mobile professionals and early technology adopters. Palm's new Tungsten T, with a suggested retail price of $499, is the company's first hand-held with built-in Bluetooth technology. That allows it to communicate wirelessly with a host of Bluetooth-enabled devices such as printers and cell phones and other equivalent Palm devices.
NEWS
January 10, 2002 | Reuters
Wireless technology giant Motorola Inc. this week introduced a new hands-free phone system for cars that will allow drivers to make calls from their regular cell phones using voice commands. Motorola's product uses wireless Bluetooth technology. The system is incorporated into a car kit that includes a speaker, microphone and control panel and is installed in the dashboard. The Chicago-area company said consumers will be able to activate the phone system by just starting the car.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Cellphone maker Motorola Inc. and Oakley Inc. plan to make sunglasses that communicate remotely with electronic devices. Schaumburg, Ill.-based Motorola will install Bluetooth technology, which allows machines to speak to one another without a wire, in Oakley-designed sunglasses, the two companies said. Details of the first models from the joint venture are expected by the middle of this year, the companies said.
BUSINESS
January 14, 2005 | David Colker, Times Staff Writer
Verizon Wireless misled customers about the capabilities of an expensive new cellphone and disabled many of the handset's key features in order to charge higher fees for its own services, a lawsuit alleges. The suit, filed Dec. 30 in Los Angeles County Superior Court, claims the nation's second-largest mobile phone provider promoted the v710 handset made by Motorola Inc. as its only model equipped with so-called Bluetooth technology.
BUSINESS
October 28, 2002 | Ron Harris, Associated Press
Palm Inc. is expected to introduce two new hand-held computer models today, each aimed at getting into the hands of tech-savvy mobile professionals and early technology adopters. Palm's new Tungsten T, with a suggested retail price of $499, is the company's first hand-held with built-in Bluetooth technology. That allows it to communicate wirelessly with a host of Bluetooth-enabled devices such as printers and cell phones and other equivalent Palm devices.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2000 | KAREN ALEXANDER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In its biggest acquisition so far, Irvine chip maker Broadcom Corp. said Tuesday it would buy a company that develops the wireless bluetooth technology for stock worth $457.1 million. Bluetooth, a hot new arena, uses radio frequencies instead of wires or cables to let electronic devices communicate with each other and over the Internet at short ranges. Broadcom, which makes high-speed communications chips, will issue 3 million shares for the 87% of Innovent Systems Inc.
BUSINESS
February 3, 2000 | From Reuters
Qualcomm Inc. said Wednesday it agreed to jointly develop with Swedish telecom firm Ericsson a technology that makes cell phones more versatile. The announcement, seen by analysts as a step to help Qualcomm hold on to a commanding market share for so-called CDMA wireless chips, sparked solid gains in both companies' stocks.
BUSINESS
July 12, 2001 | Bloomberg News
Psion, which sold the first electronic organizer in 1984, abandoned plans for new hand-held devices and said it will cut 250 jobs, or 20% of its work force. Psion said it is shifting its focus to wireless industrial and enterprise markets as its consumer-products division, Psion Digital, continues to struggle amid a marketplace glut of hand-held computers and cellular phones.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2000 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Conexant Systems Inc., a high-speed communications chip maker that has been paying top dollar for acquisitions, said Wednesday that it has agreed to buy a Canadian company for as much as $213.8 million in stock to boost its line of wireless products. The Newport Beach company would swap 2.685 million to 3 million shares for the stock of closely held Philsar Semiconductor Inc., depending on Conexant's closing price during a set period before the deal closes.
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