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SPORTS
October 6, 1996 | BOB NIGHTENGALE
The Dodgers, whose offense was completely shut down in the series, perhaps could have changed their fate in the first inning. Certainly, it would have given them much-needed momentum. Instead, a baserunning blunder by Mike Piazza took the Dodgers out of a potentially big inning and the Dodgers were down 5-0 before they knew what hit them. The situation unfolded when rookie Todd Hollandsworth hit a one-out double to left field against Tom Glavine.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1987
McDougall's article, arguing that the problem with American policy toward Iran is that we are not willing to play covert "hardball" to get what we want--our way without domestic consequences--contains a sentence that is a dangerous, if not unique, example of American (and more generally, Western) ignorance and arrogance toward history and our involvement with almost everyone else in the world in history. McDougall states, "Then, Iran and Iraq became locked in a holy war appalling enough to remind Westerners that crusading Muslims taught the medieval Christians all they knew about proselytizing with the sword."
OPINION
November 8, 2004
Thailand's prime minister appears finally to recognize that he has made a potentially explosive situation much worse in the southern part of his country, where Muslims outnumber the Buddhists who predominate in the rest of the nation. Two weeks ago, more than 1,000 Muslims in Narathiwat province protested against the arrest of six men who allegedly supplied Islamic militants with guns. Police opened fire on the crowd, killing seven.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1998
Until the U.S. missile and air strikes on Iraq Wednesday, the impeachment express was roaring toward a momentous vote in the House of Representatives, possibly as early as this evening. It still appears to be unstoppable even with the bipartisan postponement of the House vote. Perhaps the delay might provide room for brokering a resolution that would settle the House's case against President Clinton with a stern public censure for his abominable behavior in the Monica Lewinsky affair.
SPORTS
April 24, 2006 | Bill Shaikin, Times Staff Writer
The first baseman couldn't flip a ball to the pitcher. The second baseman had a ground ball carom off his glove, and so did the third baseman. The pitcher needed 36 pitches to escape the first inning. And that fake-to-third, throw-to-first pickoff play that never works? The right fielder fell for it. All of that happened to your Dodgers during the first two innings of Sunday's game. And they won, another indication that mediocrity again is the hallmark of the National League West.
OPINION
March 26, 2004
National security advisors are not above politics, even dirty politics. Henry Kissinger sought FBI wiretaps of his own National Security Council staff largely out of paranoia over a press report about secret U.S. bombing raids in Cambodia. Ronald Reagan's national security advisor, John Poindexter, lied to Congress about the Iran-Contra affair and destroyed documents about it. But fact-free spin stretches only so far.
NEWS
August 20, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Justice Department's programs to train foreign policemen and prosecutors are under investigation for alleged mishandling of U.S. secrets and management blunders, Inspector General Michael Bromwich said. The security clearances of two senior officials of the police-training program have been suspended while Bromwich's investigators complete the probe, according to Justice officials who requested anonymity.
OPINION
October 9, 1988
Gov. George Deukmejian's veto of AIDS anti-discrimination legislation is a blow to public-health efforts. His veto message indicated that his decision was based on technical grounds that ignore the consensus among public-health workers engaged in the effort to control the pandemic. The bill would have protected all persons who test positive for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) from discrimination in terms of employment and housing. That protection already exists for those with AIDS.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1997
Re "San Juan Council to Fight Juaneno Casino Proposal," July 17: We have broken hundreds of treaties with Native Americans, have stolen their land, forced them to live on the poorest lands, starved them into submission, and tortured and killed them. Now I read that the San Juan Capistrano City Council has said of the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians that "their greed is despicable" in wanting to put a gambling casino in their ancestral home. I don't approve of gambling, but it is past time to try to make some reparations for our greed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1985
The effort by Joseph Kraft is appreciated. It is the latest warning in an increasing tide of danger to the nation brought on by zany White House leadership. The big question here is not the degree of wisdom of our political leaders. It is where were these writers five years ago? The abilities, or lack of them, and the phobias of the President were as well known then as they are now. Can it be that the Establishment has begun to fear for its own welfare? The big money that flooded this country with oceans of false propaganda did not use the work of mature writers to any extent unless they said "uncle."
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