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NEWS
July 19, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times, For the Booster Shots Blog
A new way to measure and categorize an individual's body shape appears to predict more accurately whether he or she is in greater danger of premature death, says a pair of scientists in a new look at alternatives to the body-mass index (or BMI). The proposed new measure is called "A Body Shape Index," or ABSI, by the father-and-son team that has  devised and tested it, Dr. Jesse Krakauer, an endocrinologist at Middletown Medical in Middletown N.Y., and his Nir Krakauer, an assistant professor of engineering at City University of New York.
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SCIENCE
April 15, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
As a woman's body mass index rises before she is pregnant or early in pregnancy, there is an increased risk of fetal death, stillbirth or infant death, and severely obese women have the highest risk, researchers said Tuesday. But even “modest” increases in BMI were associated with increased risks, the scientists wrote in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. The scientists recommend that women and their caregivers take the findings into account as they consider getting pregnant.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
Pandora's legal disputes with performance-rights organizations are heating up. BMI, or Broadcast Music Inc., one of the groups that collects royalties from broadcasters to pay publishers and songwriters, is suing the Internet radio giant in response to its attempt to lower its rates by buying a traditional FM radio station. Pandora revealed Tuesday it is acquiring a terrestrial station in Rapid City, S.D., to make a point about the rates it pays. PHOTOS: Tech we want to see in 2013 Pandora has said it is unfairly forced to pay higher rates than traditional radio operators such as Clear Channel, which owns 850 physical stations and the Web streaming music service iHeartRadio . Last year, Pandora, which has 200 million registered users and 70 million active users, sued the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP)
SCIENCE
April 2, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
To maximize your chances of fighting flab, new research offers some simple advice: Wake up early and go outside. People who loaded up on light exposure at the beginning of the day were most likely to have a lower body mass index, according to a study published Wednesday in the journal PLOS ONE. That relationship between morning light and BMI was independent of how many calories the study participants consumed. It may sound crazy, but there is sound scientific evidence to back up the link.
NEWS
July 5, 2010 | By Jessie Schiewe, Los Angeles Times
The body mass index (BMI) isn't a perfect measure for obesity. Convenience and routine are on its side -- so health experts aren't likely to stop using it any time soon -- but its limitations have got some doctors thinking … . In a study published online Monday in the journal Pediatrics, researchers at the University of Michigan's Mott Children's Hospital found measurements of neck circumference to be a reliable technique...
SCIENCE
April 2, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
To maximize your chances of fighting flab, new research offers some simple advice: Wake up early and go outside. People who loaded up on light exposure at the beginning of the day were most likely to have a lower body mass index, according to a study published Wednesday in the journal PLOS ONE. That relationship between morning light and BMI was independent of how many calories the study participants consumed. It may sound crazy, but there is sound scientific evidence to back up the link.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2013 | By Wesley Lowery
Wearing a thick, black and white checkered shirt and dark green tam cap, Snoop Dogg strutted to the stage smoking a blunt. As the rapper took his seat at the end of the stage for the Broadcast Music Inc.'s “How I Wrote That Song” panel, an annual event, he puffed thick smoke rings into the air. The rapper, who now goes by Snoop Lion, passed the blunt to two of his fellow panelists -- rapper Busta Rhymes and rapper/musician B.o.B. -- while songwriters Luke Laird and Evan Bogart generously declined.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2002
Chuck Berry, Bo Diddley and Little Richard, a true triumvirate of rock 'n' roll royalty, will stride to a Beverly Hills stage Tuesday night for another in an endless number of awards in their careers. But this time it's an "icon award" from BMI, the performance rights group that represents 300,000 U.S. songwriters, composers and publishers. BMI, in essence, collects license fees when a song is played on the radio, performed, used on a television show, etc.
SCIENCE
November 15, 2008 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
A large European study has confirmed that simple measurements of the waist and hips may offer a better way of predicting obesity-related death than a standard, but more complicated, system of relating weight to height. The standard body mass index, or BMI, method does not work very well for some people, such as the elderly or bodybuilders, and researchers have begun building a case that it is better to look at waist circumference or the ratio of waist size to hip size. Among people with comparable BMIs, having an extra 2 inches around the waist increased the annual risk of death 17% for men and 13% for women, German researchers reported Thursday in the New England Journal of Medicine.
HEALTH
April 17, 2011 | Melissa Healy
Sometime later this year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will release its latest accounting of the nation's weight problem, as measured by the body mass index, or BMI. This much we know already: It won't be a pretty picture. The last census reckoned that a third of American adults were overweight, meaning their BMIs (calculated by dividing a person's weight by his height, squared) lay between 25 and 30. About another third weighed in with BMIs over 30 -- the demarcation line that brands them as obese.
SCIENCE
February 25, 2014 | By Melissa Healy, This post has been corrected. See note at the bottom for details.
Americans are still carrying too much weight, but a new federal study offers a glimmer of hope amongst the nation's smallest eaters: Between 2003 and 2012, obesity among children between 2 and 5 years of age has declined from 14% to 8% -- a 43% decrease in just under a decade. And much of that reduction has come in the past three to four years, as efforts to address a burgeoning child obesity crisis have escalated. The new figures came as First Lady Michelle Obama and her "Let's Move" campaign against childhood obesity launched new initiatives designed to reduce marketing for unhealthy foods and beverages seen by children in schools.
SCIENCE
January 15, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
For people with Type 2 diabetes who had hoped that their love handles might serve some purpose by reducing their risk of premature death, Harvard researchers have some bad news: The “obesity paradox” does not exist. “We found no evidence of lower mortality among patients with diabetes who were overweight or obese at diagnosis, as compared with their normal-weight counterparts, or of an obesity paradox,” the research team reported in a study that appears in Thursday's edition of the New England Journal of Medicine.
SCIENCE
December 2, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
So your body mass index says you're obese, but you don't have "pre-diabetes" - a mix of factors such as hypertension, high cholesterol and high glucose levels that indicates you're on the road to metabolic illness. And you're thinking you've beaten the odds, right? Wait 10 years, a new study says. Odds are, you'll be proven wrong. New research finds that even when a person is "metabolically healthy," being obese raises his or her risk for cardiovascular disease and premature death.
SCIENCE
August 22, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Obese is bad and lean is good. End of story, right? Wrong, say a pair of University of Pennsylvania physicians and obesity researchers who are calling for better ways to assess individual health prospects than the body mass index, or BMI. The BMI--a simple calculation that can be done with a scale and a ruler--is cheap, simple and allows comparisons of broad populations across years, cultures and continents. Since it was invented by Belgian mathematician Adolphe Quetelet in 1832, it has been the basis for research that has pointed overwhelmingly in one direction: When the formula for BMI (weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared)
NATIONAL
July 16, 2013 | By Devin Kelly
For this year's Boy Scouts of America national Jamboree, "Be Prepared" took on a new meaning: fitness. Thousands of Boy Scouts are rock climbing, BMX biking and zip-lining in West Virginia this week, hoofing it from place to place over rugged terrain for the  10-day national Jamboree program. Held for the first time at the Summit Bechtel Family National Scout Reserve, the Jamboree boasts an expanded set of venues for the 30,000 Scouts and their leaders, including mountain bike trails, challenge courses and a 3-mile hike up to a mountaintop.  But to participate, Scouts and leaders had to be in shape.  Under new fitness requirements, anybody with a body mass index above 40 was ineligible.
SCIENCE
June 19, 2013 | By Anna Gorman and Melissa Healy
Does it really matter if the medical establishment calls obesity a “disease” instead of a chronic health condition or a disorder? It's a question doctors and public health experts are considering in the wake of Tuesday's vote by members of the American Medical Assn. to upgrade obesity to “disease” status . They believe that the answer is yes. “This will make a difference” in the treatment that obese patients get, said Dr. Rexford Ahima of University of Pennsylvania's Institute for Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.
HEALTH
April 2, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
As if the nation's weight problems were not daunting enough, a new study has found that the body mass index, the 180-year-old formula used to distinguish between healthy and unhealthy weight, may be incorrectly classifying about half of women and just over 20% of men as being the picture of health when their body-fat composition suggests they are obese. The study, published Monday in the journal PLoS One, uses a patient's ratio of fat to lean muscle mass as the "gold standard" for detecting obesity and suggests that it could be a better bellwether of an individual's risk for health problems.
HEALTH
December 2, 2010 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Doctors and public health officials have been admonishing us for years that it's unhealthful to carry around extra pounds. A new study quantifies just how much that additional weight increases one's risk of death and finds that being even a few pounds overweight makes a measurable difference. Researchers analyzed the body mass index, or BMI, of 570,000 white men and women who had never smoked and followed them for an average of 10 years. They concluded that for every 5-point increase in BMI ?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
Pandora's legal disputes with performance-rights organizations are heating up. BMI, or Broadcast Music Inc., one of the groups that collects royalties from broadcasters to pay publishers and songwriters, is suing the Internet radio giant in response to its attempt to lower its rates by buying a traditional FM radio station. Pandora revealed Tuesday it is acquiring a terrestrial station in Rapid City, S.D., to make a point about the rates it pays. PHOTOS: Tech we want to see in 2013 Pandora has said it is unfairly forced to pay higher rates than traditional radio operators such as Clear Channel, which owns 850 physical stations and the Web streaming music service iHeartRadio . Last year, Pandora, which has 200 million registered users and 70 million active users, sued the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP)
SCIENCE
May 20, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Having childhood attention deficit hyperactivity disorder could lead to a life of obesity, even if ADHD symptoms disappear in adulthood, a new study shows. The study, which followed up on 207 middle-class men who had been diagnosed with ADHD as children, found that some 33 years after their diagnosis, their body mass index was significantly higher than those without ADHD. Their propensity to become obese was twice that of adults who were never diagnosed with ADHD, according to the study published Monday in the journal Pediatrics.
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