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NEWS
February 1, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Childhood obesity in America is on the rise, but kids don't seem to be getting the message. Parents can pick up advice and tips from these experts who run a wellness program that focuses on children's health. The guests on a live Web chat Wednesday (1 p.m. EST, noon CST, 10 a.m. PST) will be pediatrician Dr. Angela Fals along with a Healthy 100 Kids team that includes a registered dietitian, an exercise physiologist and a psychologist. Before the chat, check out whether your child has a weight problem.
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NEWS
March 4, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
When a nearly 600-pound man who boldly promoted food at a restaurant called the Heart Attack Grill dies, one of the first reactions is likely to be ... , well, not one of surprise. But then comes the news that Blair River might have died of pneumonia. Hold on. Don't order up that 8,000-calorie burger just yet. Note that there is a potential link between obesity and pneumonia. "After accounting for factors such as lifestyle and education, moderately obese men -- those with a body mass index between 30 and 34.9 -- had a 40% greater risk of pneumonia compared with those of normal weight (BMI of less than 24.9)
BUSINESS
July 28, 1987 | KEVIN BRASS
The Belly Up Tavern had been open in Solana Beach for about four years when two well-dressed men visited owner Dave Hodges in his small office. "They looked like Louie and Lefty," recalled Hodges, referring to stereotypical characters in gangster movies.
SCIENCE
January 15, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
For people with Type 2 diabetes who had hoped that their love handles might serve some purpose by reducing their risk of premature death, Harvard researchers have some bad news: The “obesity paradox” does not exist. “We found no evidence of lower mortality among patients with diabetes who were overweight or obese at diagnosis, as compared with their normal-weight counterparts, or of an obesity paradox,” the research team reported in a study that appears in Thursday's edition of the New England Journal of Medicine.
NEWS
January 6, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Unhealthy dieting and weight-loss strategies, such as using over-the-counter diet pills or yo-yo dieting, typically backfire among teens and young adults, a new study suggests. While overweight or obese teens may need to adopt healthier diets and increase physical activity, it's common for young people to look for quicker fixes to lose weight. But the new study, published in the Journal of Adolescent Health , found that unhealthy weight-control strategies caused teens to be heavier 10 years later no matter what their body mass index was to begin with.
NEWS
February 27, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
If primary care doctors build intensive counseling programs to help their obese patients exercise, lose weight and get healthy, will they work? A new study finds that for half the population, at least, they will. For men and women alike, results will be modest. And for women, they won't last. The authors of the study, published Monday in the Archives of Internal Medicine, concluded that physicians' efforts to improve their obese patients' health by promoting lifestyle change might do better to embrace "a more realistic expectation": a modest reduction of patients' waist circumference and the prevention of further weight gain.
NATIONAL
July 16, 2013 | By Devin Kelly
For this year's Boy Scouts of America national Jamboree, "Be Prepared" took on a new meaning: fitness. Thousands of Boy Scouts are rock climbing, BMX biking and zip-lining in West Virginia this week, hoofing it from place to place over rugged terrain for the  10-day national Jamboree program. Held for the first time at the Summit Bechtel Family National Scout Reserve, the Jamboree boasts an expanded set of venues for the 30,000 Scouts and their leaders, including mountain bike trails, challenge courses and a 3-mile hike up to a mountaintop.  But to participate, Scouts and leaders had to be in shape.  Under new fitness requirements, anybody with a body mass index above 40 was ineligible.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1987 | MIKE GRANBERRY, Times Staff Writer
The issue was music and, in a sense, who owns it. The setting was the Belly-Up Tavern, which as one emcee put it, felt a little bit like "Live Aid" in North County--or, as one voice in the crowd put it, "How-to-Get-Paid Aid." Mixing music with politics Sunday night, headliners Thelma Houston and John Ford Coley gave the winningest testimony as to why their music belongs to them--they sang it and played it.
NEWS
August 9, 2010
Having a large waist is associated with a host of potentially serious health issues, such as heart disease, high cholesterol, Type 2 diabetes and inflammation. According to a new study, it may also be linked to something else: death. Researchers from the Epidemiology Research Program of the American Cancer Society in Atlanta looked at data among 48,500 men and 56,343 women ages 50 and older who were mostly white and took part in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort. In 1997 they supplied their weight and waist circumference.
NEWS
December 29, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Older, obese people may be more prone to falls than their thinner peers, a study finds, and some may also be more prone to disability. The study, published recently in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society , followed 10,755 people age 65 and older for eight years. In that time there were 9,621 falls, and 3,130 of them required medical attention for injuries. Researchers also measured how much the fall affected activities of daily living, such as eating, getting dressed and walking across a room.
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