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NEWS
November 29, 2012 | By Melissa Healy
Alright, you've heard your newborn bundle of joy's lusty cry; you've counted his or her fingers and toes; you may just have learned the baby's gender. So let's not waste another minute before sucking the joy from this picture of blissful innocence and answering a key question about his or her health and appearance: Will he or won't she be fat? Noting that "prevention of obesity should start as early as possible after birth," international researchers have devised a checklist of factors that can be quickly toted up at a mother's bedside to predict with moderate certainty -- an accuracy of between 71% and 85% -- her newborn's prospects of becoming obese.
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NEWS
January 7, 2013 | By Karin Klein
To combat a growing problem with anorexia and bulimia, a new law in Israel bans fashion models who are considered unhealthily thin and requires the labeling of photos that are digitally altered to make the models look thinner. Unhealthily thin is defined as a body-mass index lower than 18.5. An example being tossed around is that a woman 5 feet 8 inches tall who weighs 120 pounds would be considered, well, not quite kosher for the cameras. That's a long way from zaftig, but certainly an improvement over the bony waifs that have too long been held up as icons of beauty.
NEWS
February 27, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
If primary care doctors build intensive counseling programs to help their obese patients exercise, lose weight and get healthy, will they work? A new study finds that for half the population, at least, they will. For men and women alike, results will be modest. And for women, they won't last. The authors of the study, published Monday in the Archives of Internal Medicine, concluded that physicians' efforts to improve their obese patients' health by promoting lifestyle change might do better to embrace "a more realistic expectation": a modest reduction of patients' waist circumference and the prevention of further weight gain.
NATIONAL
July 16, 2013 | By Devin Kelly
For this year's Boy Scouts of America national Jamboree, "Be Prepared" took on a new meaning: fitness. Thousands of Boy Scouts are rock climbing, BMX biking and zip-lining in West Virginia this week, hoofing it from place to place over rugged terrain for the  10-day national Jamboree program. Held for the first time at the Summit Bechtel Family National Scout Reserve, the Jamboree boasts an expanded set of venues for the 30,000 Scouts and their leaders, including mountain bike trails, challenge courses and a 3-mile hike up to a mountaintop.  But to participate, Scouts and leaders had to be in shape.  Under new fitness requirements, anybody with a body mass index above 40 was ineligible.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1987 | MIKE GRANBERRY, Times Staff Writer
The issue was music and, in a sense, who owns it. The setting was the Belly-Up Tavern, which as one emcee put it, felt a little bit like "Live Aid" in North County--or, as one voice in the crowd put it, "How-to-Get-Paid Aid." Mixing music with politics Sunday night, headliners Thelma Houston and John Ford Coley gave the winningest testimony as to why their music belongs to them--they sang it and played it.
NEWS
April 5, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Survivors of breast cancer may want to watch their post-diagnosis weight -- a study finds that women who gain a large amount of weight may be at greater risk of cancer recurrence and death. The study, being presented at the American Assn. for Cancer Research's meeting this week in Orlando, Fla., followed breast-cancer survivors in three groups from the United States and one from China. Women who gained 10% or more than their pre-diagnosis weight were 14% more likely to have the disease return compared with women whose weight stayed fairly steady, within 5% of their pre-diagnosis weight.
NEWS
December 29, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Older, obese people may be more prone to falls than their thinner peers, a study finds, and some may also be more prone to disability. The study, published recently in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society , followed 10,755 people age 65 and older for eight years. In that time there were 9,621 falls, and 3,130 of them required medical attention for injuries. Researchers also measured how much the fall affected activities of daily living, such as eating, getting dressed and walking across a room.
NEWS
August 9, 2010
Having a large waist is associated with a host of potentially serious health issues, such as heart disease, high cholesterol, Type 2 diabetes and inflammation. According to a new study, it may also be linked to something else: death. Researchers from the Epidemiology Research Program of the American Cancer Society in Atlanta looked at data among 48,500 men and 56,343 women ages 50 and older who were mostly white and took part in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort. In 1997 they supplied their weight and waist circumference.
NEWS
November 29, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
There's no consensus on how much weight an overweight or obese woman should gain during pregnancy--in 2009 the Institute of Medicine changed its guidelines, lowering it to 11 to 20 pounds for obese moms-to-be, but not everyone agrees. A study finds that there may be few differences in pregnancy-related results for women who gain more or less weight. The study, published in the December issue of the journal Obesity , looked at data on 691 obese women. Of those, 57.7% had a pre-pregnancy body mass index of 30 to 34.9 (considered level I obesity)
SCIENCE
February 25, 2014 | By Melissa Healy, This post has been corrected. See note at the bottom for details.
Americans are still carrying too much weight, but a new federal study offers a glimmer of hope amongst the nation's smallest eaters: Between 2003 and 2012, obesity among children between 2 and 5 years of age has declined from 14% to 8% -- a 43% decrease in just under a decade. And much of that reduction has come in the past three to four years, as efforts to address a burgeoning child obesity crisis have escalated. The new figures came as First Lady Michelle Obama and her "Let's Move" campaign against childhood obesity launched new initiatives designed to reduce marketing for unhealthy foods and beverages seen by children in schools.
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