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NEWS
May 3, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Packing on even a few extra pounds in midlife can increase the risk of developing dementia, such as Alzheimer's disease, by 70% or more, Swedish researchers reported Monday. Earlier studies had shown an increased risk from being obese, but the new research reported in the journal Neurology is the first to show that simply being overweight is enough to increase the risk. "Our results contribute to the growing evidence that controlling body weight or losing weight in middle age could reduce your risk of dementia," co-author Dr. Weili Xu of the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm said in a statement.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1989
Re "Dance and Exercise Studios Paying the Piper," by Julie Wheelock, Sept. 17: As a self-employed musician, I can certainly sympathize with the small business owners who feel that the extra burden of paying the necessary ASCAP/BMI fees is not only difficult but ethically questionable. The unfortunate thing is that those very musicians and composers who write, arrange and produce the music that everyone feels they can use freely are often operating at a budget and living condition far below the life style of anyone who can afford to get a loan and open a business.
NEWS
February 1, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Childhood obesity in America is on the rise, but kids don't seem to be getting the message. Parents can pick up advice and tips from these experts who run a wellness program that focuses on children's health. The guests on a live Web chat Wednesday (1 p.m. EST, noon CST, 10 a.m. PST) will be pediatrician Dr. Angela Fals along with a Healthy 100 Kids team that includes a registered dietitian, an exercise physiologist and a psychologist. Before the chat, check out whether your child has a weight problem.
NEWS
March 4, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
When a nearly 600-pound man who boldly promoted food at a restaurant called the Heart Attack Grill dies, one of the first reactions is likely to be ... , well, not one of surprise. But then comes the news that Blair River might have died of pneumonia. Hold on. Don't order up that 8,000-calorie burger just yet. Note that there is a potential link between obesity and pneumonia. "After accounting for factors such as lifestyle and education, moderately obese men -- those with a body mass index between 30 and 34.9 -- had a 40% greater risk of pneumonia compared with those of normal weight (BMI of less than 24.9)
BUSINESS
July 28, 1987 | KEVIN BRASS
The Belly Up Tavern had been open in Solana Beach for about four years when two well-dressed men visited owner Dave Hodges in his small office. "They looked like Louie and Lefty," recalled Hodges, referring to stereotypical characters in gangster movies.
NEWS
March 4, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
Obesity isn’t terribly consistent with good health. The more severe the obesity, the worse the health effects. But extra pounds alone don’t account for all of the health problems in people who are overweight. A study out this week suggests that society’s bias against fat people is partly to blame too. Here’s the theory behind how it works: The higher your body-mass index, the more likely you are to think that you’ve been a victim of weight discrimination.
NEWS
February 27, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
If primary care doctors build intensive counseling programs to help their obese patients exercise, lose weight and get healthy, will they work? A new study finds that for half the population, at least, they will. For men and women alike, results will be modest. And for women, they won't last. The authors of the study, published Monday in the Archives of Internal Medicine, concluded that physicians' efforts to improve their obese patients' health by promoting lifestyle change might do better to embrace "a more realistic expectation": a modest reduction of patients' waist circumference and the prevention of further weight gain.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1987 | MIKE GRANBERRY, Times Staff Writer
The issue was music and, in a sense, who owns it. The setting was the Belly-Up Tavern, which as one emcee put it, felt a little bit like "Live Aid" in North County--or, as one voice in the crowd put it, "How-to-Get-Paid Aid." Mixing music with politics Sunday night, headliners Thelma Houston and John Ford Coley gave the winningest testimony as to why their music belongs to them--they sang it and played it.
NEWS
August 9, 2010
Having a large waist is associated with a host of potentially serious health issues, such as heart disease, high cholesterol, Type 2 diabetes and inflammation. According to a new study, it may also be linked to something else: death. Researchers from the Epidemiology Research Program of the American Cancer Society in Atlanta looked at data among 48,500 men and 56,343 women ages 50 and older who were mostly white and took part in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort. In 1997 they supplied their weight and waist circumference.
NEWS
December 29, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Older, obese people may be more prone to falls than their thinner peers, a study finds, and some may also be more prone to disability. The study, published recently in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society , followed 10,755 people age 65 and older for eight years. In that time there were 9,621 falls, and 3,130 of them required medical attention for injuries. Researchers also measured how much the fall affected activities of daily living, such as eating, getting dressed and walking across a room.
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