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BUSINESS
July 28, 1987 | KEVIN BRASS
The Belly Up Tavern had been open in Solana Beach for about four years when two well-dressed men visited owner Dave Hodges in his small office. "They looked like Louie and Lefty," recalled Hodges, referring to stereotypical characters in gangster movies.
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SCIENCE
June 19, 2013 | By Anna Gorman and Melissa Healy
Does it really matter if the medical establishment calls obesity a “disease” instead of a chronic health condition or a disorder? It's a question doctors and public health experts are considering in the wake of Tuesday's vote by members of the American Medical Assn. to upgrade obesity to “disease” status . They believe that the answer is yes. “This will make a difference” in the treatment that obese patients get, said Dr. Rexford Ahima of University of Pennsylvania's Institute for Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.
NEWS
June 5, 2012 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Want to gauge your risk for developing Type 2 diabetes? Don't just step on the scale - reach for a measuring tape too, a new study suggests. The circumference of your waist can tell you a lot about your chances of getting diabetes, according to a study published Tuesday in the journal PLoS Medicine . Health providers usually rely on body mass index to determine patients' diabetes risk, but adding waist circumference to the equation would...
NEWS
April 6, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
When the National School Lunch Program began in 1946, the idea was to get nutritious food into the stomachs of malnourished children from low-income families. Ironic, then, that these days the school lunch program is being scrutinized for its role in contributing to the growing problem of childhood obesity in America. The latest report was published online this week by the Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine. It concludes that girls who participate in the National School Lunch Program gain weight at a faster clip than other girls from low-income families who do not get the subsidized lunches (and sometimes breakfasts)
NEWS
March 4, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
Obesity isn’t terribly consistent with good health. The more severe the obesity, the worse the health effects. But extra pounds alone don’t account for all of the health problems in people who are overweight. A study out this week suggests that society’s bias against fat people is partly to blame too. Here’s the theory behind how it works: The higher your body-mass index, the more likely you are to think that you’ve been a victim of weight discrimination.
NEWS
February 27, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
If primary care doctors build intensive counseling programs to help their obese patients exercise, lose weight and get healthy, will they work? A new study finds that for half the population, at least, they will. For men and women alike, results will be modest. And for women, they won't last. The authors of the study, published Monday in the Archives of Internal Medicine, concluded that physicians' efforts to improve their obese patients' health by promoting lifestyle change might do better to embrace "a more realistic expectation": a modest reduction of patients' waist circumference and the prevention of further weight gain.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1987 | MIKE GRANBERRY, Times Staff Writer
The issue was music and, in a sense, who owns it. The setting was the Belly-Up Tavern, which as one emcee put it, felt a little bit like "Live Aid" in North County--or, as one voice in the crowd put it, "How-to-Get-Paid Aid." Mixing music with politics Sunday night, headliners Thelma Houston and John Ford Coley gave the winningest testimony as to why their music belongs to them--they sang it and played it.
NEWS
November 29, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
There's no consensus on how much weight an overweight or obese woman should gain during pregnancy--in 2009 the Institute of Medicine changed its guidelines, lowering it to 11 to 20 pounds for obese moms-to-be, but not everyone agrees. A study finds that there may be few differences in pregnancy-related results for women who gain more or less weight. The study, published in the December issue of the journal Obesity , looked at data on 691 obese women. Of those, 57.7% had a pre-pregnancy body mass index of 30 to 34.9 (considered level I obesity)
NEWS
August 9, 2010
Having a large waist is associated with a host of potentially serious health issues, such as heart disease, high cholesterol, Type 2 diabetes and inflammation. According to a new study, it may also be linked to something else: death. Researchers from the Epidemiology Research Program of the American Cancer Society in Atlanta looked at data among 48,500 men and 56,343 women ages 50 and older who were mostly white and took part in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort. In 1997 they supplied their weight and waist circumference.
NEWS
April 5, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Survivors of breast cancer may want to watch their post-diagnosis weight -- a study finds that women who gain a large amount of weight may be at greater risk of cancer recurrence and death. The study, being presented at the American Assn. for Cancer Research's meeting this week in Orlando, Fla., followed breast-cancer survivors in three groups from the United States and one from China. Women who gained 10% or more than their pre-diagnosis weight were 14% more likely to have the disease return compared with women whose weight stayed fairly steady, within 5% of their pre-diagnosis weight.
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