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Boat Slips

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1994 | FRANK MESSINA
County officials are warning sailors up and down the Southern California coast of an impending shortage of boat slips while a three-month renovation project at the popular Dana Point Harbor is underway. The logjam will mainly affect boats that use the harbor as a stopover while traveling between San Diego and Los Angeles. Boat owners who rent slips in Dana Point will be moved to guest slips while reconstruction is done.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2011 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
On a waterfront crowded with docks, restaurants and tourist shops, Baby Beach is a mellow haven. Families and school groups regularly crowd onto the tiny, sheltered beach, where children can safely splash in a nearly wave-free swimming area sandwiched between the Ocean Institute and Dana Point Harbor. Kayakers and stand-up paddlers relish the beach as a calm, easy launching spot. But all that could be at risk. Orange County is proposing to build docks in front of the strand as part of its effort to revitalize the aging marina in the harbor.
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NEWS
October 6, 1991 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After years of behind-the-scenes bargaining, Los Angeles County negotiators and the developer of the massive Playa Vista project have reached agreement on construction of a new yacht harbor next to Marina del Rey. The agreement, which must be ratified by the County Board of Supervisors, would allow developer Maguire Thomas Partners to carve a new boat channel to Santa Monica Bay across a narrow piece of county-owned land in Marina del Rey.
BUSINESS
December 8, 2009 | By Ronald D. White
For the Camello family of San Pedro, the repossessed 40-foot sailboat with its mahogany decks and twin carbon fiber masts has come to symbolize all that has gone wrong with their business and the pleasure-craft industry. The sailboat sits quietly at the family business, Colonial Yacht Anchorage in Wilmington. Until the recession hit, the company focused on managing its own vessel repair business and 120-slip marina. Now it's selling repossessed vessels such as this schooner.
OPINION
July 12, 2006
The story "Feeling the Squeeze" (July 9) quotes various yacht brokers and harbor designers and developers cheerleading for supersized boats costing millions of dollars, all of which eliminate marina space and boat slips for smaller, lower-cost ocean recreation craft for the general public. All of these cheerleaders profit from the conversion of public marinas to luxury playgrounds. The story borders on outrageous with the quote by San Francisco harbor developer Brad Gross criticizing the California Coastal Commission for seeking to preserve smaller boat slips and accommodations (calling it unjustified "social engineering")
NEWS
June 20, 1991
The developer of the Playa Vista project has purchased four pieces of property at a key intersection in Playa del Rey so that the intersection can be expanded to accommodate the traffic generated by the vast proposed city-within-a-city. Maguire Thomas Partners paid $2.8 million for slightly less than an acre of land at the corner of Culver Boulevard and Vista del Mar. The triangular site includes a restaurant, a small office building and a former gas station.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1995 | ADRIAN MAHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group of residents and boat owners recently filed a lawsuit against the California Coastal Commission and Los Angeles County challenging a controversial plan to redevelop the marina. The Friends of Marina del Rey, a local citizens group, charges in the suit that the plan violates eight ordinances of the 1976 California Coastal Act, which requires that coastal development provide and protect public access. The alleged violations in the plan include excessive private use of the marina instead of public recreational use and inadequate safeguards against traffic congestion caused by the development.
NEWS
March 16, 1986
Supervisor Deane Dana's comments on Marina del Rey cityhood (Times, Feb. 13) are replete with misstatements. They should be highly suspect, since his campaign funds have been fatly fueled with contributions from the marina lessees who own apartment buildings, store buildings and boat slips--and rent the land. When he says that public funds built the marina, he conveniently forgets the role the Army Corps of Engineers played in dredging the various marina channels, with no cost to the county.
NEWS
December 30, 1990
Preparation of an environmental impact report on the multibillion-dollar Playa Vista project is running behind schedule, and the draft document will not be available for public review until spring at the earliest. Playa Vista senior partner Nelson C. Rising said consultants are working on the report, which will identify the consequences of building the proposed city-within-a-city between Marina del Rey and the Westchester Bluffs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2001
How much do docked boats contribute to harbor pollution? It's not just a question for marine biologists and environmentalists. There are a lot of people spending one or more nights on their boats in Orange County docks. The city of Huntington Beach recently asked its staff to look at prohibiting boat owners from staying overnight on vessels. The reaction has been understandably strong.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2009 | Andrew Blankstein
Just sit right back and you'll hear a tale, a tale of an empty slip. Or in the case of Marina del Rey, more than 200 of them. In good times, there was a two-year waiting list for spaces and small boaters complained that they were being pushed out by bigger boats. But as of February, Los Angeles County officials said, the number of boat slip vacancies at Marina del Rey had nearly doubled to 259, compared with 133 a year earlier.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2007 | Christian Berthelsen, Times Staff Writer
Boaters in Newport Harbor are exploiting loopholes in a law to "sell" publicly owned moorings, resulting in some owners waiting years -- sometimes decades -- to get a spot to tie up their yachts, according to a grand jury report released Thursday. Private brokers have created a cottage industry selling rights to mooring slips along with the boats that are registered to them, allowing buyers to circumvent the long wait others endure to get one of the 1,235 moorings in the harbor, the report said.
OPINION
July 12, 2006
The story "Feeling the Squeeze" (July 9) quotes various yacht brokers and harbor designers and developers cheerleading for supersized boats costing millions of dollars, all of which eliminate marina space and boat slips for smaller, lower-cost ocean recreation craft for the general public. All of these cheerleaders profit from the conversion of public marinas to luxury playgrounds. The story borders on outrageous with the quote by San Francisco harbor developer Brad Gross criticizing the California Coastal Commission for seeking to preserve smaller boat slips and accommodations (calling it unjustified "social engineering")
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2002 | Sandra Murillo, Times Staff Writer
The Oxnard Planning Commission has unanimously approved a $100-million residential project, which includes hundreds of houses and condominiums, a marina and commercial buildings on 135 acres near the ocean. The Seabridge project, an extension of the Mandalay Bay development, is the last major element of a 20-year-old plan to develop the Channel Islands Harbor area, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2002 | STANLEY ALLISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even people along Newport Beach's Gold Coast can use a little extra income. Owners of million-dollar homes overlooking Newport Bay are pocketing as much as $9,000 a year renting out boat slips that the city allows them to own for a yearly fee of $80. The practice has been going on for years but appears to have become more common recently because of a shortage of berths for large yachts. Some owners of 50-foot yachts must wait as long as three years to find a slip in the harbor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2001
How much do docked boats contribute to harbor pollution? It's not just a question for marine biologists and environmentalists. There are a lot of people spending one or more nights on their boats in Orange County docks. The city of Huntington Beach recently asked its staff to look at prohibiting boat owners from staying overnight on vessels. The reaction has been understandably strong.
SPORTS
November 13, 1985 | RICHARD BUFFUM
The sloop, Herald Bird, was full of supplies, and ready for a cruise to Catalina Island last weekend when my wife and I began to have misgivings about the weather. It was not that a bit of wind would have bothered us. It's the chill factor on a wet day, and all indications were that it would be wet and lumpy through the San Pedro Channel. We decided against the trip. After 14 years with the Bird in nearly every type of weather, we still sail with an open cockpit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2011 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
On a waterfront crowded with docks, restaurants and tourist shops, Baby Beach is a mellow haven. Families and school groups regularly crowd onto the tiny, sheltered beach, where children can safely splash in a nearly wave-free swimming area sandwiched between the Ocean Institute and Dana Point Harbor. Kayakers and stand-up paddlers relish the beach as a calm, easy launching spot. But all that could be at risk. Orange County is proposing to build docks in front of the strand as part of its effort to revitalize the aging marina in the harbor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2001 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
County supervisors on Tuesday cleared the way for an $82-million revitalization of Dana Point Harbor, the first true make-over of the marina since its birth. Among the changes ahead are a renovation of the 132-room Marina Inn, a harbor parking structure and larger boat slips. The project has evolved during a two-year stretch as the county renegotiated new contracts to replace 30-year leases that were signed in 1971 when the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers completed the harbor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 1999 | STEVE CHAWKINS
Authorities Friday were trying to identify a man whose body was discovered in Channel Islands Harbor shortly after midnight. An apparent drowning victim, the man bore no signs of injury, said Craig Stevens, a senior deputy county coroner. Dressed in a maroon sweatsuit and wearing a gold necklace, the white male was thought to be 55 to 65 years old. He was 5-foot-7, weighed 200 pounds and had a short, well-trimmed gray beard. A pair of prescription sunglasses was tucked into his hair.
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