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Bob Anderson

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2012 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Ten days before Bob Anderson headed to the 1952 Olympic Games in Helsinki as part of the British fencing team, he responded to a call from a British film studio in need of three fencers to coach the lead actors for sword-fighting scenes in a new pirate movie. The movie was "The Master of Ballantrae," starring veteran Hollywood swashbuckler Errol Flynn. Anderson didn't win any medals at the Olympics, but he unexpectedly launched a new side career in the movies. Anderson, 89, who became an Olympic fencing coach while carving out a more-than-50-year career as a fencing trainer to the stars and a movie sword-fight choreographer and stunt double, died early New Year's Day at a hospital in England, the British Academy of Fencing announced.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2012 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Ten days before Bob Anderson headed to the 1952 Olympic Games in Helsinki as part of the British fencing team, he responded to a call from a British film studio in need of three fencers to coach the lead actors for sword-fighting scenes in a new pirate movie. The movie was "The Master of Ballantrae," starring veteran Hollywood swashbuckler Errol Flynn. Anderson didn't win any medals at the Olympics, but he unexpectedly launched a new side career in the movies. Anderson, 89, who became an Olympic fencing coach while carving out a more-than-50-year career as a fencing trainer to the stars and a movie sword-fight choreographer and stunt double, died early New Year's Day at a hospital in England, the British Academy of Fencing announced.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1995 | CHRIS RIEMENSCHNEIDER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you want dance scenes in a movie, you go to a choreographer. Cute doggy tricks, look up animal trainers. Explosions, try a pyro-technician. But if you're looking for a good sword fight, you call Bob Anderson.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1996 | Stephen Cox, Stephen Cox is an occasional contributor to Calendar
This time of year, film fans everywhere remind Bob Anderson of his wonderful life. Called Bobbie at age 12, Anderson was the clean-cut kid who portrayed Jimmy Stewart's character, a young soda jerk, in the opening scenes of Frank Capra's latent classic "It's a Wonderful Life." Stewart would later commend Anderson for his performance as the young George Bailey, a film genus that both men would share for a lifetime. Capra produced, directed and cast the film down to the extras.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1985 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
Robert O. Anderson, who parlayed a small New Mexico oil refinery into industry giant Atlantic Richfield, said Monday that he will retire as Arco's chairman on Jan. 1. Lodwrick M. Cook, 57, who became president and chief executive last June, will succeed 68-year-old Anderson as chairman. Robert E. Wycoff, 54, an Arco vice chairman, will take the president's title from Cook at the Los Angeles-based oil company. Anderson, who maintains a cattle ranch in Roswell, N.M.
REAL ESTATE
January 2, 1994 | STEPHANIE O'NEILL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; O'Neill is a Los Angeles free - lance writer
Scanning the mountains for smoke has long been an integral part of Nancy Goldsworthy's routine. The Pasadena native and life-long veteran of canyon living in dry Southern California has always accepted the threat of fire.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1990 | GERALD FARIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
El Segundo City Councilman Alan West has been accused of voting on city-sponsored improvements and promotions for the downtown business district, where he owns commercial property. The conflict charges were filed this week with the state Fair Political Practices Commission by Helen Armstrong, the widow of former mayor Charles Armstrong. Armstrong, whom West helped defeat in a bitter election four years ago, died in July of cancer. West is up for reelection in April.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1996 | Stephen Cox, Stephen Cox is an occasional contributor to Calendar
This time of year, film fans everywhere remind Bob Anderson of his wonderful life. Called Bobbie at age 12, Anderson was the clean-cut kid who portrayed Jimmy Stewart's character, a young soda jerk, in the opening scenes of Frank Capra's latent classic "It's a Wonderful Life." Stewart would later commend Anderson for his performance as the young George Bailey, a film genus that both men would share for a lifetime. Capra produced, directed and cast the film down to the extras.
NEWS
February 18, 1988 | JOHN GABREE
Sex and death. The stuff of best sellers, tabloids, hit movies and, especially during sweeps week, the 11 o'clock news. So why not the stuff of a magazine targeted at teen-agers? With teen pregnancies and suicides at epidemic rates, isn't there a need for a magazine that talks to young people in their own language about the real world? For Sassy ($2), a colorful new monthly that appeared on the nation's newsstands on Tuesday, the answer is an unequivocal yes. Unfortunately, in taking on serious topics in what its editors hope is a candid, nonjudgmental way, Sassy reduces life and death matters to the level of squibs on fashion and grooming.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1993 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Displaying a gruesome photo and a bloodstained pair of tennis shoes, prosecutors began building their case Wednesday against Lyle and Erik Menendez, accused of murder in the 1989 shotgun slayings of their parents. The photo, posted on a bulletin board for jurors to examine, shows the brothers' father, Jose Menendez, slumped in the corner of a white couch, his head at an odd angle and his white shirt covered with blood.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1995 | CHRIS RIEMENSCHNEIDER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you want dance scenes in a movie, you go to a choreographer. Cute doggy tricks, look up animal trainers. Explosions, try a pyro-technician. But if you're looking for a good sword fight, you call Bob Anderson.
REAL ESTATE
January 2, 1994 | STEPHANIE O'NEILL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; O'Neill is a Los Angeles free - lance writer
Scanning the mountains for smoke has long been an integral part of Nancy Goldsworthy's routine. The Pasadena native and life-long veteran of canyon living in dry Southern California has always accepted the threat of fire.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1990 | GERALD FARIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
El Segundo City Councilman Alan West has been accused of voting on city-sponsored improvements and promotions for the downtown business district, where he owns commercial property. The conflict charges were filed this week with the state Fair Political Practices Commission by Helen Armstrong, the widow of former mayor Charles Armstrong. Armstrong, whom West helped defeat in a bitter election four years ago, died in July of cancer. West is up for reelection in April.
NEWS
February 18, 1988 | JOHN GABREE
Sex and death. The stuff of best sellers, tabloids, hit movies and, especially during sweeps week, the 11 o'clock news. So why not the stuff of a magazine targeted at teen-agers? With teen pregnancies and suicides at epidemic rates, isn't there a need for a magazine that talks to young people in their own language about the real world? For Sassy ($2), a colorful new monthly that appeared on the nation's newsstands on Tuesday, the answer is an unequivocal yes. Unfortunately, in taking on serious topics in what its editors hope is a candid, nonjudgmental way, Sassy reduces life and death matters to the level of squibs on fashion and grooming.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1985 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
Robert O. Anderson, who parlayed a small New Mexico oil refinery into industry giant Atlantic Richfield, said Monday that he will retire as Arco's chairman on Jan. 1. Lodwrick M. Cook, 57, who became president and chief executive last June, will succeed 68-year-old Anderson as chairman. Robert E. Wycoff, 54, an Arco vice chairman, will take the president's title from Cook at the Los Angeles-based oil company. Anderson, who maintains a cattle ranch in Roswell, N.M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1990
The El Segundo City Council voted 3-0 on Tuesday to raise council members' salaries from $327 a month to $483. The raise will take effect April 17. Mayor Carl Jacobson and Councilmen H. R. (Bob) Anderson and Alan West voted for the raise. Councilmen Jim Clutter and Scot Dannen abstained, saying they did not want to vote to raise their own pay.
NEWS
November 25, 1985
One person was killed when a tanker truck overturned and burst into flames on the westbound Artesia Freeway near Atlantic Boulevard. Firefighters battled the blaze for about 30 minutes before containing it, said Long Beach Fire Dispatcher Bob Anderson. Firefighters remained on the scene cooling down the truck, and westbound lanes were closed for several hours. The victim was believed to be the driver of the truck.
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